Paris is for walkers and cyclists as city bans cars for day

Published: Sunday, October 01, 2017 @ 8:39 AM
Updated: Sunday, October 01, 2017 @ 8:37 AM

Parisians and tourists were encouraged to stroll through the City of Light on Sunday as officials banned cars from its streets for a day.

Paris has experimented with car-free days in the past, but Sunday marked the first time the entire city was handed over to ramblers, cyclists and roller-bladers.

Only emergency vehicles, buses and taxis were allowed on the streets from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. Paris time.

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"It's nice for the air quality, for enjoying the city, walking around without any noise, without any risk to be run over by a car," Maxime Denis said as he strolled near Place de la Republique in the city center. "But it should be a real no car day. There are still a few so we are careful."

Another resident, Francois Boillat, noted that "as a Parisian, I only use public transport all the time, even though I have a car buried in a sixth basement car park and I barely use it. It is a bit stupid. I should sell it."

Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo was elected on a promise to curb air pollution and reduce car traffic in the French capital, where vehicle emissions are often high.

The car-free day created a potential headache for the organizers of Paris fashion week, who rely on trucks to install and remove lavish, sky's-the-limit shows. Worried fashion houses like Valentino sent out numerous email reminders to guests who planned to arrive by car, reminding them to organize alternative transport.

The Paris couture federation, which supports the initiative, spent months working with police and local authorities to ensure events ran smoothly.

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Back-to-school selfies may spread super lice, expert says

Published: Thursday, July 12, 2018 @ 9:14 AM

An expert says selfies in which people pose with their heads close together can cause lice infestations. (Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash)
Element5 Digital on Unsplash
An expert says selfies in which people pose with their heads close together can cause lice infestations. (Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash)(Element5 Digital on Unsplash)

Parents may want to add super lice remedies to the back-to-school shopping list.

A 2013 study in the Journal of Medical Entomology found that in North America, most head lice has evolved into a new, more powerful strain that is immune to traditional lice treatments, hence the name “super lice.”

Canada had been experiencing an alarming rise in cases, and there have been multiple outbreaks across the U.S. in recent years.

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Because super lice can be difficult to get rid of, prevention is key, and that’s where those popular selfies come into play.

Any activity that brings kids’ heads within close contact with one another, or involves sharing combs, hats, etc. will raise the risk of contracting lice. Dawn Mucci, founder of Lice Squad, told Global News in 2016 that she is seeing a growing number of lice cases among teens, likely due to the selfie craze.

Despite the scary name, Lice Clinics of America cautions that combing and nitpicking can still be effective treatments. The clinics also provide a lice remover kit for super lice, and AirAllé, an FDA-cleared lice device for professional lice treatments.

Still, the best way to prevent infestation is to keep your head away from other heads.

Parents should consult a medical professional on the most effective, safe treatments for super lice.

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Should you work out for 30 minutes or an hour?

Published: Sunday, September 18, 2016 @ 10:07 AM
Updated: Sunday, September 18, 2016 @ 10:18 AM

How long should you work out?

 

Thirty minutes might not seem long enough when it comes to reaching your fitness goals, but in the exercise world, more isn't always better.

 

According to personal trainer Jeff Smith, intensity beats duration.

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"If you're working very hard, you can do it in an hour," he said. "So the length of time is really irrelevant without looking at the intensity of the work."

 

The government's fitness recommendations aren't meant to keep you in the gym for hours. It says adults ages 18 to 64 should exercise at a moderate intensity for at least 2 1/2 hours each week or at a vigorous intensity for 1 hour and 15 minutes a week.

 

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When it comes to knocking out those workouts in 30 minutes vs. 60 minutes, Smith said to think of it like sprinting vs. jogging: What you spend on intensity, you make up for in time. It's why high-intensity interval training, or HIIT workouts, are so popular right now. They can be as short as 20 minutes, and you not only burn more calories than a lower-intensity training session, but you keep burning calories in the hours after you're done.

 

But you need to work up to that.

 

If you're a rookie, a 60-minute workout could be easier because it might be tough to go at the intensity you need for a shorter time.

 
And as you get stronger, Smith said you can easily cut out some exercises that don't maximize your time. For example, if you want to lose weight, chin-up exercises are better than bicep curls because they work more muscle groups.

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CDC: Over 100 people sickened in deadly salmonella outbreak involving Maradol papayas

Published: Friday, August 04, 2017 @ 12:51 PM

CDC: Over 100 People Sickened In Deadly Salmonella Outbreak Involving Maradol Papayas

In an update from officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Friday, the number of people sickened in the salmonella outbreak involving Maradol papayas has grown.

A total of 109 people from 16 states have been infected in the salmonella outbreak as of Aug. 3, the CDC said in a news release.
The states involved are CT, DE, IA, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MN, NC, NJ, NY, OK, PA, TX, VA, and WI.

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One death has been reported, and 35 people have been hospitalized, according to the CDC.

An additional strain of salmonella tied to Maradol papayas imported from Mexico has also been discovered, the CDC reported.

The FDA has found salmonella strains in other papayas from Carica de Campeche farm, which expands the original recall notice that urged consumers to avoid Caribeña brand Maradol papayas, distributed by Grande Produce.

The CDC and FDA are continuing their investigation to determine where in the supply chain the papayas became contaminated.

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Romaine lettuce likely safe to eat again, per CDC report

Published: Friday, May 18, 2018 @ 12:34 PM

E. Coli Outbreak in At Least 25 States Linked to Romaine Lettuce

The latest update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the deadly multistate E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona, growing region brought a bit of positive news.

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While the CDC reported 23 more cases of illness from 13 states since the agency's May 9 update, the affected produce should no longer be available for sale.

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The latest news release from the CDC posted on Wednesday said that the "last shipments of romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region were harvested on April 16, 2018 and the harvest season is over. It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region is still available in stores or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life."

The CDC reports that, as of May 15, 172 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 32 states. 

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