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GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: How key parts of federal government are affected

Published: Thursday, February 08, 2018 @ 7:44 PM
Updated: Thursday, February 08, 2018 @ 7:51 PM

The Statue of Liberty is pictured from Liberty State Park on January 21, 2018 in Jersey City, New Jersey. The iconic landmark was closed yesterday as part of the US government shutdown now entering its second full day after coming into effect at midnight on Friday after senators failed to pass a new federal spending bill. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)
The Statue of Liberty is pictured from Liberty State Park on January 21, 2018 in Jersey City, New Jersey. The iconic landmark was closed yesterday as part of the US government shutdown now entering its second full day after coming into effect at midnight on Friday after senators failed to pass a new federal spending bill. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

As of midnight Friday morning, the government has officially shutdown. 

Many government operations will continue — U.S. troops will stay at their posts and mail will get delivered. But almost half the 2 million civilian federal workers will be barred from doing their jobs.

WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT LOCAL FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FACILITIES

RELATED: Wright-Patt workers to report to work Friday

RELATED: Government shutdown: How will you be impacted

How key parts of the federal government would be affected by a shutdown:

IRS

A shutdown plan posted on the Treasury Department’s website shows that nearly 44 percent of the IRS’ 80,565 employees will be exempt from being furloughed during a shutdown. That would mean nearly 45,500 IRS employees will be sent home just as the agency is preparing for the start of the tax filing season and ingesting the sweeping changes made by the new GOP tax law.

The Republican architects of the tax law have promised that millions of working Americans will see heftier paychecks this month, with less money withheld by employers in anticipation of lower income taxes. The IRS recently issued new withholding tables for employers.

But Marcus Owens, who for 10 years headed the IRS division dealing with charities and political organizations, said it’s a “virtual certainty” that the larger paychecks will be delayed if there’s a lengthy government shutdown.

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT

Half of the more than 80,000 employees will be sent home. Key programs will continue to function because their funding has ongoing authorization and doesn’t depend on annual approval by Congress. But critical disruptions could occur across the vast jurisdiction of HHS programs — including the seasonal flu program.

Medicare, which insures nearly 59 million seniors and disabled people, will keep going. And so will Medicaid, which covers more than 74 million low-income and disabled people, including most nursing home residents.

States will continue to receive payments for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which covers about 9 million kids. However, long-term funding for the program will run out soon unless Congress acts to renew it.

Deep into a tough flu season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be unable to support the government’s annual seasonal flu program. And CDC’s ability to respond to disease outbreaks will be significantly reduced.

JUSTICE DEPARTMENT

Many of the nearly 115,000 Justice Department employees have national security and public safety responsibilities that allow them to keep working during a shutdown. Special counsel Robert Mueller’s team investigating Russian meddling in the presidential election will also continue working. His office is paid for indefinitely.

The more than 95,000 employees who are “exempted” include most of the members of the national security division, U.S. attorneys, and most of the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Marshals Service and federal prison employees. Criminal cases will continue, but civil cases will be postponed as long as doing so doesn’t compromise public safety. Most law enforcement training will be canceled, per the department’s contingency plan.

STATE DEPARTMENT

Many State Department operations will continue in a shutdown. Passport and visa processing, which are largely self-funded by consumer fees, will not shut down. The agency’s main headquarters in Washington, in consultation with the nearly 300 embassies, consulates and other diplomatic missions around the world, will draw up lists of nonessential employees who will be furloughed.

The U.S Capitol on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, after a short-term spending bill vote failed Friday night, sending the government into a shutdown on the one-year anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration, in Washington, D.C. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS)

DEFENSE DEPARTMENT

The U.S. military will continue to fight wars and conduct missions around the world, including in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. And members of the military will report to work, though they won’t get paid until Congress approves funding.

Weapons and equipment maintenance will shut down, military intelligence operations would stop and training for most of the reserve force would be put on hold, he said. And any National Guard forces heading out to do weekend training duty around the country will arrive at armories and be told to go home.

U.S. INTELLIGENCE AGENCIES

The workforce at the 17 U.S. intelligence agencies will be pared down significantly, according to a person familiar with contingency procedures.

The official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the matter and spoke on condition of anonymity, said employees who are considered essential and have to work will do so with no expectation of a regular paycheck.

While they can be kept on the job, federal workers can’t be paid for days worked during a shutdown. In the past, however, they have been paid retroactively even if they were ordered to stay home.

HOMELAND SECURITY DEPARTMENT

A department spokesman said nearly 90 percent of Homeland Security employees are considered essential and will continue to perform their duties during a government shutdown.

That means most Customs and Border Protection and Transportation Security Administration workers will stay on the job, according to the department’s shutdown plan, dated Friday.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement will be staffed at about 78 percent, meaning more than 15,000 of the agency’s employees will keep working. The Secret Service, also part of Homeland Security, will retain more than 5,700 employees during the shutdown.

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT

During the last shutdown, the Interior Department said national parks and other public lands will remain as accessible as possible. That position is a change from previous shutdowns, when most parks were closed and became high-profile symbols of dysfunction.

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

More than half — 34,600 — of the Department of Transportation’s 55,100 employees will continue working during a shutdown. The bulk of those staying on the job work for the Federal Aviation Administration, which operates the nation’s air traffic control system.

Controllers and aviation, pipeline and railroad safety inspectors are among those who would continue to work.

But certification of new aircraft will be limited, and processing of airport construction grants, training of new controllers, registration of planes, air traffic control modernization research and development, and issuance of new pilot licenses and medical certificates will stop.

At the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, investigations on auto safety defects will be suspended, incoming information on possible defects from manufacturers and consumers won’t be reviewed and compliance testing of vehicles and equipment will be delayed.

The Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, whose operations are mostly paid for out of the Federal Highway Trust Fund, will continue most of their functions. The fund’s revenue comes from federal gas and diesel taxes, which will continue to be collected. But work on issuing new regulations will stop throughout the department and its nine agencies.

Electrical fire reported at Kettering Health Network building

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 5:09 AM
Updated: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 5:10 AM

Crews are responding to a reported electrical fire at the Kettering Health Network building in Miamisburg.

The fire at the business on Prestige Plaza was reported before 5 a.m. 

>> Accused Santa Fe shooter won’t get death penalty -- and could get paroled today

This story will be updated as additional information becomes available.

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Isolated storms, strong winds to develop today

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 3:43 AM

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini looks at when more storms develop.

>> Cloudy with a chance of Podcast: A podcast for weather fans 

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Isolated storms today, possibly strong
  • Warmer than normal week
  • Dry time returns

>> 5-Day Forecast

DETAILED FORECAST

TODAY: A mild and muggy morning, yet a quiet start to the day. Some sunshine and scattered clouds expected into the afternoon. Isolated storms develop late afternoon that may become strong with the main threat being strong to damaging winds. Activity tapers off into the night, but a few showers may linger. Highs reach around 80 degrees with it being a little breezy. 

>> LIVE Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

TUESDAY: A passing rain shower is possible in the morning. It’ll be warm and muggy again for the afternoon as highs peak in the 80s. Another passing shower or storm is possible towards late afternoon with heavy rain and gusty winds being the main threat. Expect it to dry out into the night. 

WEDNESDAY: Not as muggy as other days, but still becoming very warm as highs reach in the low 80s. Expect sunshine and scattered clouds through the day.

>> County-by-County Weather

THURSDAY: A great day with plenty of sunshine. It won’t be too muggy, yet it’ll be warm with highs in the low 80s again, which is warmer than normal. 

FRIDAY: The dry stretch continues with warmer than normal temps in the middle 80s. Humidity will be low for the day with lots of sunshine. 

Dayton traffic from the WHIO Traffic Center

Published: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 @ 2:44 AM
Updated: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 4:41 AM

SCENE: Car fire on NB I-675
SCENE: Car fire on NB I-675

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic.

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • No incidents to report. 

Surface Street Incidents

  • No incidents to report

>> RELATED: WHIO Weather App

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

  • Arlington Road between Pleasant Plain and Upper Lewisburg Salem Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE, March 5 - Sept. 30. All ramps for I-70 will remain open. 
  • Airport Access Road South between US 40 and I-70, Lane closure May 8 - 31. One southbound lane will remain open.
  • Diamond Mill Road between Upper Lewisburg-Salem Road and Pleasant Plain Road, ROAD CLOSURE April 30 - May 20. The official detour is: Upper Lewisburg Salem Road to Wellbaum Road to Brookville Salem Road
  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west, RAMP CLOSURE, March 12 - Sept. 30. The official detour is: I-75 north to US 35 east to Jefferson/Main Street to Ludlow Street to US 35 west. 
  • I-75 between SR 48 and Needmore Road, Nightly lane closures April 29 - July 31 between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. Will become double lane closures at 10 p.m. 
  • SR 4 between Infirmary Road and Frytown Road, ROAD CLOSURE April 23 - June 3. The official detour is: SR 725 to I-75 to SR 4
  • SR 48 between First Street and Riverdale Street, Lane closure April 2, 2018 - April 1, 2019. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 48 between Monument Avenue and Riverview Avenue, BRIDGE CLOSURE May 18 - 21. The officials detour is: north Monument Avenue to Great Miami Boulevard to SR 48; south: Great Miami Boulevard to Riverside Drive to Monument Avenue to SR 48. 

GREENE COUNTY

  • I-675 near Dayton Yellow Springs Road, daily LANE CLOSURES, on both the north and south lanes due to bridge work May 21 - May 24 between 9 a.m.- 2 p.m. 
  • State Route 235 between Dayton Yellow Springs and Enon Roads, ROAD CLOSURE for six months. The official detour is U.S. 68, West Hyde, and West Enon Roads.
  • Trebein Road from U.S. 35, Lane restrictions April 16 - August, 2018 for construction of a right turn lane. One lane will remain maintained at all times with flagging operations. 

WARREN COUNTY

MIAMI COUNTY

  • N. Market Street between Foss Way/Kirk Lane and Stonyridge Avenue, ROAD CLOSURE March 5 at 7 a.m. - Aug. 10 at 5 p.m. 
  • SR 721 between Sugar Grove Road and Deeter Road, ROAD CLOSURE May 7 - 28. The official detour is SR 721 to SR 718 to SR 48 to US 36 to SR 721
  • US 36 westbound between Scott Drive and Kienle Drive, Lane closure March 26 - June 30. One westbound lane will remain open. 
  • US 36 between Scott Drive and Aerovent Drive, Lane closure April 26 - August 31. 

DARKE COUNTY

  • SR 705 between Groff Road and US 127, ROAD CLOSURE May 14 - 28. The official detour is: US 127 to SR 119 to SR 118
  • US 36/US 127 between Hogpath Road and Horatio- Harris Creek Road, Daily lane closures April 30 - August 31 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
  • Sweitzer Street/West Fourth Street between Pine Street and Sycamore Street, ROAD CLOSURE May 21 - 31. The official detour is: Pine Street to Washington Avenue to Broadway 

MERCER COUNTY

  • SR 117 between US 127 and SR 116, Daily lane closures April 23 - July 31 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. 
  • SR 49 between Menchhofer Road and SR 219, ROAD CLOSURE April 16 - 30. The official detour is: SR 29 to SR 118 to SR 219
  • SR 49 between SR 119 and St. Joes Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE May 7 - 25. The official detour is: SR 119 to SR 118 to SR 219
  • SR 29 between Wabash Road and Burrville Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE May 24 - June 13. The official detour is SR 49 to SR 219 to SR 118.

SHELBY COUNTY

  • SR 47 between Fifth Avenue and Wilkinson Avenue, Lane closures Jan. 21 - Nov. 27. One lane will remain open in each direction at all times. 
  • SR 274 between Shroyer Road and Island Avenue, Lane closure April 9 - June 9. One lane will remain open in each direction. 

CLARK COUNTY

  • I-70 east Ramp to I-675 north, RAMP CLOSURE March 15 - Aug. 15. The official detour is: I-70 east to I-675 south to SR 444 to I-675 north
  • Spangler Road south between Restoration Drive and I-70, Traffic pattern switch March 26 - August 15. Southbound Spangler Road traffic going to I-675 south and I-70 east will be moved to northbound side of I-675. Traffic will then be redirected to the southbound side of I-675 after passing over I-70. 

CHAMPAIGN COUNTY

  • Upper Valley Pike between State Route 296 and Lippincott Road, ROAD CLOSURE, starting April 16 for approximately four weeks.

LOGAN COUNTY

  • SR 274 between Morris Rose Road and SR 235, Daily lane closures May 1 - June 29 between 7 a.m. 5 p.m. 
  • SR 235 between SR 720 and SR 117, Daily lane closures May 1 - June 29 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • SR 235 between Van Gorder Road County Road 54 and Main Street County Road 91, Lane closure April 30 - May 25.
  • SR 68 between SR 508 and Gunn Town Road, Daily lane closures April 23 - June 29 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. 

AUGLAIZE COUNTY

  • SR 501 between Infirmary Road and National Road, daily lane closures April 30 - June 1 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. 
  • US 33 between SR 29 and I-75, Daily lane closures March 26 - July 31 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. One lane will remain open in each direction. 

Dayton to activate 5 red-light cameras for 30-day warning period

Published: Friday, May 18, 2018 @ 6:32 PM
Updated: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 3:58 AM

Five traffic enforcement red-light cameras will be activated starting today at two intersections.

Three cameras will be at James H. McGee Boulevard and West Third Street, and two others are at Linden Avenue and South Smithville Road. A 30-day warning period begins Monday at both locations, according to a release from the city.

>> Dayton’s red light, speed cameras will run 24/7 without police present

During the warning period, the registered owner of a vehicle committing a violation will be sent a warning in the mail. After 30 days, citations will be issued by mail, according to the city.

Activation of these red-light cameras completes the Dayton Police Department’s plan for traffic enforcement cameras.

Following is a list of fixed-site camera locations, along with the current locations of mobile speed trailers:

  • West Third Street at James H. McGee Boulevard (three red light cameras) 
  • North Gettysburg Avenue at Fairbanks Avenue (two speed cameras) 
  • North Main Street at Siebenthaler Avenue (one speed camera) 
  • South Keowee Street between East Third Street and East Fourth Street (two speed cameras) 
  • South Smithville Road at Linden Avenue (two red light cameras) 
  • Area of Troy Street and Stanley Avenue (two mobile speed trailers) 
  • North Main Street near Forest Glen Avenue (one mobile speed trailer). 

The Dayton Police Department also uses six handheld speed enforcement camera units. 

There have been 84 fewer injury crashes (432) to date in 2018 compared to 516 injury crashes during the same period in 2017, the city reported.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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