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Atlanta mayoral election: Bottoms declares victory, Norwood asking for recount

Published: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 @ 12:25 AM
Updated: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 @ 12:25 AM

Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood. (Photo via WSBTV.com)
WSBTV.com
Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood. (Photo via WSBTV.com)(WSBTV.com)

12:27 a.m. EST Wednesday: Mary Norwood says she's asking for a recount as Keisha Lance Bottoms declares a victory in the Atlanta mayor's race.

>> Visit WSBTV.com for the latest on this developing story

With 100 percent of the precincts reporting, Bottoms leads by just 759 votes. Bottoms, introduced by Mayor Kasim Reed as the 60th mayor of Atlanta, declared victory as she spoke to her supporters, but Norwood said the race isn't over yet.

>> On WSBTV.com: LIVE real-time election results

ORIGINAL STORY: Today is the day Atlanta will decide which woman will become its next mayor.

>> Watch the news report here

Polls officially opened at 7 a.m. Tuesday.

Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood spent Monday at City Hall doing the people’s business, but they also did some campaigning before Tuesday’s election. And with the race coming to an end, some people are now deciding whom they plan to endorse.

>> Visit WSBTV.com for complete coverage

Outside City Hall, more endorsements came in for Bottoms. Prominent attorneys and progressives stood with her.

“I have no doubt in my mind that Ms. Bottoms will surround herself with a team of compassionate and thoughtful people with the political savvy to make this city better,” said assistant professor Maurice Hobson.

>> On WSBTV.com: Keisha Lance Bottoms, Mary Norwood face off ahead of Election Day

But across town, a civil rights activist said he’s endorsing Mary Norwood.

“Dr. King said it best: 'People want to be judged based on their character, not the color of their skin.' That works not just for white people but for African-Americans,” said the Rev. Markel Hutchins. 

Hutchins said he supports Norwood because of her decades of public service.

>> Read more trending news 

“What Atlanta needs now is not just someone who is desiring of the office of mayor but someone who legitimately wants to serve the public,” Hutchins said.

Both candidates were at Monday’s City Council meeting after the Tuesday’s election, and it will be one of their last; one will become mayor and the other will become a private citizen.

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White House, Truth Campaign launch opioid education ads

Published: Thursday, June 07, 2018 @ 11:10 AM



Contributed
(Contributed)

The Trump Administration is partnering with the Truth Campaign and the Ad Council to launch a series of digital and television ads aimed at educating young people about opioids and preventing new addictions. 

Truth was the group behind past tobacco cessation campaigns they say prevented 1 million young people from beginning to smoke cigarettes. The spots were often provocative including one in which young people dumped body bags outside the office of a tobacco company.

“Truth has a long-established track-record,” said Kellyanne Conway, adviser to President Donald Trump and the head of the administration’s response to the opioid epidemic. The group has the trust of youth, she said, and knows how to communicate with them. 

RELATED: Ohio schools aren’t following guidelines for drug education

The campaign, which the Ad Council said could end up being about a $30 million effort, is being largely funded through donated time by the council and Truth to research and create the ads, as well as donated media space by partners including Google, Facebook, Amazon and YouTube. 

The campaign is launching with four ads that depict true stories of young people who went to extreme measures to obtain opioids in order to feed their addictions. 

One of those ads, “Amy’s Story,” features a young woman from Columbus, Ohio who purposefully wrecked her car to get more pain pills. 

“Misuse starts among young people,” said Robin Koval, CEO of Truth. Even though people of all ages are impacted by opioid addiction, the group chose to focus on prevention where addiction starts, with young people who are experimenting, sharing pills and sometimes being prescribed opioids for the first time due to injuries. “We want to stop filling the funnel from the top,” Koval said. 

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Rep. Turner: Report won’t dispute Putin sought to help Trump

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 11:23 AM

Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio
Washington Bureau
Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio(Washington Bureau)

A yet-to-be released House Republican intelligence committee report does not dispute claims that Russian President Vladimir Putin may have tried to help President Donald Trump defeat Democrat Hillary Clinton, Rep. Mike Turner said Wednesday.

In a strongly worded letter to the Republican chairman of the intelligence committee, Turner, R-Dayton, wrote, “There is no dispute that Putin intended to harm our democracy and hurt Clinton’s campaign and expected presidency through an active measures’ campaign that included the hacking and dumping of e-mails along with the dissemination of propaganda via Russian state-run media and social media.”

FILE - In this file photo taken on Friday, July 7, 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump, right, meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany. The Kremlin said Trump called Putin to congratulate him on re-election, and White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed that Trump spoke with Putin Tuesday March 20, 2018.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Turner, a member of the intelligence committee, was reacting to claims made earlier this month by GOP committee members that the report did not accuse Putin of trying to help Trump win the election. In addition, the same Republicans said they found no evidence of collusion between Trump campaign officials and Russian officials linked to Putin.

RELATED: Portman says firing Mueller would be ‘big mistake’

The committee will vote Thursday on whether both Democrats and Republicans on the panel agree with its findings. The 150-page report has not yet been released, but Democrats strongly objected to the GOP claims that Putin was not trying to help Trump.

Turner indicated that he agrees with the findings of the intelligence committee but disputes claims some lawmakers made last week that the report did not find Putin tried to help Trump.

RELATED: Senators push for better security in election season

Representative K. Michael Conaway, R-Texas, who headed up the probe, said last week “the Russians did commit active measures against our election in ’16, and we think they will do that in the future.” But Conaway said GOP members “disagree with the narrative that they were trying to help Trump.”

FILE - In this file photo taken on Friday, July 7, 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump, right, meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany. The Kremlin said Trump called Putin to congratulate him on re-election, and White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed that Trump spoke with Putin Tuesday March 20, 2018.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

In his letter, Turner said the committee report did not find any evidence of collusion between Putin and Trump campaign aides. But he also wrote the intelligence committee’s report “should not be interpreted as ending or contradicting the work of” Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

With rumors swirling that Trump may try to fire Mueller, Republicans have begun to criticize the moment. On Tuesday, Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said firing Mueller would be a big mistake.

Mueller is investigating whether Russia interfered in the 2016 election and whether Trump aides colluded with Russian officials.

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NYT: Democrat Conor Lamb wins PA’s special election, beating Rick Saccone in a Trump stronghold

Published: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 @ 2:33 PM
Updated: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 @ 2:33 PM

Lamb Declares Victory in Pennsylvania Special Election, Saccone Does Not Concede

Update March 14, 2018 7:35 p.m EDT: Democrat Conor Lamb has won Pennsylvania’s special election in the 18th Congressional district, beating Republican Rick Saccone in a GOP stronghold by a thin margin of just over 600 votes, according to The New York Times, which called the election late Wednesday.

Republicans have not conceded the election and are likely to demand a recount, the Times reported.

Update March 14, 2018 2:32 p.m. EDT: Sources told WPXI’s Rick Earle that the Republican party has hired an independent firm to look for voting irregularities in Tuesday’s special election.

Although unofficial results for the race put Democratic candidate Conor Lamb just a few hundred votes ahead of his Republican rival for the 18th Congressional District seat, Rick Saccone, a recount of the vote is unlikely. If the race was one that was statewide, it would trigger an autmoatic recount, as less than .5 percent separates Lamb and Saccone’s tallies. The same rules don’t apply to congressional races.

 >> On WPXI.com: Why there may not be a recount in the 18th Congressional District race

A recount can only happen if three or more voters from each precinct petition for a recount due to fraud or errors in the vote counting.

Update March 14, 2018 12:50 a.m. EDT: Democratic candidate Conor Lamb has declared victory over opponent Rick Saccone in the closely watched special election in Pennsylvania for the 18th Congressional District seat.

>> Visit WPXI.com for complete coverage of this developing story

Saccone has not conceded.

The Pennsylvania Secretary of State's election results website currently has Lamb with a 113,111-112,532 edge in votes. However, there are still an unclear number of absentee, provisional and military ballots to count.

>> Read more trending news 

ORIGINAL STORY: Polls have closed in the special election for the 18th Congressional District, a race that has drawn national attention and is seen by some as a referendum on President Donald Trump.

Political newcomer Conor Lamb showed strength in fundraising and the polls for Democrats, who are seeking to control a seat that has been primarily Republican for decades. 

The GOP pinned its hopes to Rick Saccone, a four-term state representative who has tied himself very closely to Trump throughout the campaign.

The seat opened in October when longtime representative Tim Murphy resigned amid a scandal.

The district, which stretches through parts of Greene, Allegheny, Washington and Westmoreland counties, could change by May after the state Supreme Court threw out the electoral map in January, saying it was unconstitutional. 

The court issued a new map intended to take effect by the May primaries, although Republicans have challenged that map in court.

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

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Trump takes last place in 'presidential greatness' survey

Published: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 7:16 AM

President Trump And Twitter

President Donald Trump took last place in a new survey that aims to measure "presidential greatness."

>> President Donald Trump endorses Mitt Romney in Utah Senate race

According to the results posted Monday by Boise State University, 170 political scientists participated in the 2018 Presidents and Executive Politics Presidential Greatness Survey. More than 57 percent of the respondents – current and recent members of the Presidents and Executive Politics Section of the American Political Science Association – were Democrats, while 13 percent were Republicans and 27 percent were Independents. Respondents gave each president a score of 0-100 for "overall greatness," then each president's scores were averaged.

>> Read: Trump addresses nation after deadly Florida high school shooting

So who took the No. 1 spot? Abraham Lincoln led the pack with a score of 95.03, followed by George Washington, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson, Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower. Those presidents' ranks remained unchanged from 2014.

Among recent presidents, Barack Obama fared the best, placing eighth with a score of 71.13. Ronald Reagan took the No. 9 spot, while Bill Clinton came in at No. 13, George H.W. Bush at No. 17, Jimmy Carter at No. 26 and George W. Bush at No. 30.

>> Read more trending news 

Trump ranked No. 44 – last place – with a score of 12.34. Among Republican respondents, he fared slightly better, coming in at No. 40.

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