Former teacher indicted on sex charges wants evidence suppressed

Published: Wednesday, September 06, 2017 @ 3:36 PM
Updated: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 12:06 PM

Former Stivers School for the Arts English and drama teacher John S. Findley was in court today. He's accused of pandering obscenity or sexually oriented material involving a minor. Prosecutors say the victim was not a DPS student.

UPDATE @ 12:07 p.m. (Sept. 20):

A lawyer for former Dayton Public School teacher John S. Findley, indicted on seven counts of pandering obscenity of a minor, wants a judge to suppress evidence.

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Findley, 34, appeared in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court on Wednesday for a scheduling conference, and he now has a suppression hearing scheduled for Nov. 1.

Defense attorney Jon Paul Rion said the defense will challenge the way police collected some information.

Dayton police reiterated Wednesday that the investigation is ongoing and anyone with information or knows someone who claims to be a victim should call Sgt. Gary Lowe at 937-333-1132.

RELATED: Former teacher indicted on seven minor obscenity charges

UPDATE @ 10:06 a.m. (Sept. 20):

John S. Findley is scheduled to appear in Montgomery County Common Pleas court this morning for a scheduling conference.

MORE: 3 things to know about Dayton teacher arrested on child sex charges

Dayton police are sill asking if anyone believes they were a victim or know a victim of Findley to contact police at 937-333-1132.

UPDATE, 11 a.m.: The former Dayton Public Schools teacher indicted on allegations of sex offenses involving minors had been put on paid leave during the last school year.

John S. Findley was placed on leave on April 18, according to the president of the Dayton teachers union, David Romick.

This news organization has requested additional records from Dayton Public Schools regarding Findley.

FIRST REPORT: Former Dayton Public Schools teacher John S. Findley has been indicted on seven felony counts of pandering obscenity involving a minor and pandering sexually oriented material Involving a minor.  

Findley, 34, of Westona Drive in Dayton, was listed on Dayton Public Schools’ website as a teacher of drama and English at Stivers School for the Arts. DPS officials said Findley resigned effective July 9. It was unclear Wednesday how long he had taught at Stivers, but a program from a 2014 Stivers play lists him as being with the school’s Career Technical Theatre Preparatory Program.

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Court records show that Findley was indicted Aug. 29 for alleged actions that occurred between November 2015 and August 2016. Jail records show he was arrested Tuesday and entered a plea of not guilty, with bond set at $100,000. 

The next listed court appearance is a scheduling conference Sept. 20 in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court. 

Dayton Public Schools issued a statement Wednesday afternoon, saying the district “is fully cooperating with all law enforcement” in the case. Superintendent Rhonda Corr said DPS has established a crisis intervention team that will be at Stivers on Thursday and will be available “as long as necessary.” The district referred further questions to Dayton Police Det. James Hardin.

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One of the four pandering obscenity counts says that Findley did “direct or produce an obscene performance that has a minor as its participants.” The indictment also accuses Findley of promoting the material for sale or dissemination on Aug. 8 or Aug. 9 of 2016.

The three counts of pandering sexually oriented material involving a minor include language saying Findley “created, directed or produced” the performance. 

Six of the charges are second-degree felonies, according to the indictment, while one is a fourth-degree felony. 

Ohio Department of Education records show Findley held a four-year Alternative Resident Educator License that expired this summer. ODE lists his teaching field as Performing Arts, as well as a class in principles of art and communication.

ODE’s educator discipline site shows no prior professional conduct discipline records against Findley.

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Police: 2 shot and killed at Trotwood apartment complex

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 12:17 AM
Updated: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 1:16 PM

At least 1 dead in Trotwood shooting

UPDATE @ 1:15 p.m. (April 19): 

Two people were shot and died from their injuries at a Trotwood apartment complex late Wednesday night, police confirmed Thursday. 

Both victims were found shot multiple times inside a car in the complex parking lot, according to investigators. 

The victim found in the front seat, identified by the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office as Elmer Rucker, 23, of Dayton, was transported to Miami Valley Hospital but did not survive his injuries, police said. 

The driver, identified by the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office as Antonio F. Collins, 25, of Dayton, was pronounced dead at the scene, according to investigators. 

Additional details were not available. 

FIRST REPORT (April 18):

Residents reported hearing eight to 10 gunshots in a deadly shooting Wednesday night at the Pinewood Gardens apartments.

Shortly after midnight, an investigator with the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office was on the way to the complex on Pinewood Circle off West Main Street between End and High streets.

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Medics and police were called sometime after 11 p.m. after there were reports of eight to 10 shots fired, according to the Miami County Regional Dispatch Center.

Residents reported hearing gunshots and then seeing ambulances, fire trucks and police cruisers at the rear of the parking lot.

In a 911 call to dispatchers, one resident reported that the multitude of shots actually forced them to get down on the floor inside of the apartment.  

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It was not immediately clear how many people were shot or injured by the gunfire, nor whether police have any suspects.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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Dayton’s newest mosque to open; public and international guests expected

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 1:09 PM


            Retired Imam Celal Shahin stands inside the Osman Gazi mosque at 1508 Valley St. The mosque hosts its grand opening on Sunday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
Retired Imam Celal Shahin stands inside the Osman Gazi mosque at 1508 Valley St. The mosque hosts its grand opening on Sunday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The first official Ahiska Turkish mosque in many years has a grand opening in Old North Dayton on Sunday that is expected to attract dignitaries from across the globe and that is a testament to the strong growth of the local Turkish population.

But the Osman Gazi Mosque and Sunday’s celebration aren’t just for Turkish people or Muslims, leaders say.

The mosque, located at 1508 Valley St., is a public place that welcomes the entire community, and the goal is to unite people with interfaith events and activities, said Mirza Mirza, who is the secretary on Osman Gazi’s board of directors.

“We want to create something that is multicultural, multilingual, and gets everyone together,” he said.

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Osman Gazi’s grand opening is at 1 p.m. Sunday, and festivities include a picnic in a park owned by the mosque and a prayer service.

Local leaders, out-of-town guests and religious representatives and consul from Turkey will be in attendance. The public is invited and encouraged to come.

People have prayed at the Valley Street building since it was first purchased by Osman Gazi in 2014. The building was formerly a funeral home that had been vacant for years.

But using donations, Osman Gazi has transformed what was an eyesore into an eye-catching house of worship.

The exterior of the building is turquoise, with green trim. The inside has Ottoman Empire-style designs, featuring colorful tile and turquoise carpet that were hand-crafted in Turkey.

A gold chandelier hangs from the ceiling. On the ceiling is written the “99 names of god.”

The walls are covered in calligraphy, and entryway arches have been painted to resemble roman stone.

More than $500,000 was invested into the prayer spaces, and that doesn’t count other projects.

“We tried to put a 1,000-year history in this house,” Mirza said.

Osman Gazi’s investment in that part of Old North Dayton is far from over.

Leaders purchased an old church building across the street that it is using as a school .

The school hosts Saturday and Sunday classes for children on the Koran and Islam. Right now, the school is open only to Turkish children and a couple of kids from Somalia.

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But once the building is renovated, possibly by next year, classes will be opened up to everyone, Mirza said. Also, the school plans to host after-school programming, such as sport leagues and other recreational activities.

The church and school have a significant amount of green space that leaders hope to use for barbecues and other community events.

The mosque has taken years to build because there were fewer Ahiska Turkish families in the Dayton region several years ago, and families often have limited incomes shortly after relocating here, Mirza said.

But the Dayton area has more than 1,000 Ahiska Turkish families now, according to some estimates, that is concentrated in Old North Dayton.

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No criminal charges filed in Prince's 2016 overdose death, prosecutor says

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 12:48 PM
Updated: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 12:48 PM

Prince - By the Numbers

Authorities have declined to press criminal charges against anyone in the 2016 overdose death of musical icon Prince, saying Thursday that investigators were unable to determine where the artist got the fentanyl that killed him.

>> Read more trending news

>> READ MORE: Charges could be announced in Prince opioid investigation two years after his death | Prince died of fentanyl overdose, autopsy report released | Search warrants unsealed in Prince death investigation | Photos: Prince through the years | MORE

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6 men charged in Ohio prison drug smuggling attempt

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 9:42 AM

Staff photo
Georgia Department of Corrections
Staff photo(Georgia Department of Corrections)

Six men, including three from Dayton, have been charged for allegedly attempting to smuggle drugs into an Ohio prison, according to the Department of Justice. 

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Alton Herron, 46, Rodney Herron, 27, and Daviontae Norvell, 26, all from Dayton are among the six men indicted on drug-related charges, a Department of Justice spokesperson said in a media release Thursday. 

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Joseph Brodbeck, 59, of Columbus, Gerry Branner, 27, of Cincinnati, and William A. Lowery, 30, were also indicted on the same charges. 

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The six men are accused of conspiring to distribute Suboxone, cocaine, methamphetamine, and marijuana inside the Lonon Correctional Institute in Madison County, according to the release. 

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“Brodbeck was a contract employee of the prison’s food service company and worked in the prison kitchen. He allegedly smuggled narcotics in to inmates after purchasing the narcotics in various cities in Southern Ohio, including Middletown, Dayton and Springfield, the spokesperson said in the release.” 

The other five charged were all inmates of prison in London at one point and allegedly paid Broadbeck for the drugs, according to investigators. 

All six are facing a charge of conspiring to possess with intent to distribute narcotics, a crime punishable by up to 20 years in prison, according to the Justice Department. 

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