Brock Turner leaves jail, protests follow in California, Ohio

Published: Friday, September 02, 2016 @ 7:33 PM


            Brock Turner leaves the Santa Clara County Main Jail on Friday, Sept. 2, 2016, in San Jose, Calif. Turner was released after serving 3 months of his 6-month sentence for the sexual assault of an unconscious woman in January of 2015. The judge in the case, Aaron Persky, has come under fire for a sentence that many consider light. (Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group/TNS)
            Dan Honda
Brock Turner leaves the Santa Clara County Main Jail on Friday, Sept. 2, 2016, in San Jose, Calif. Turner was released after serving 3 months of his 6-month sentence for the sexual assault of an unconscious woman in January of 2015. The judge in the case, Aaron Persky, has come under fire for a sentence that many consider light. (Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group/TNS)(Dan Honda)

WHY IS BROCK TURNER GETTING RELEASED AFTER THREE MONTHS?

Turner, like nearly all California jail inmates, will be released after serving half his sentence. As long as jail inmates stay out of trouble behind bars, they generally get two days of credit for every day served.

WHAT’S THE FALLOUT?

The California Assembly voted 66-0 Monday to make a prison sentence mandatory for the same crime Turner committed. Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown has not said whether he would sign it.

Judge Aaron Persky is facing a recall effort, with organizers saying they will begin collecting signatures in April to try to qualify the issue for the November 2017 ballot. A women’s advocacy group has filed a formal misconduct complaint with the state agency that disciplines judges.

He also has voluntarily removed himself from hearing criminal cases, starting next week. Prosecutors earlier removed from an unrelated sex assault case.

WHERE WILL TURNER LIVE?

Turner is expected to return to his parents’ home in Sugarcreek Twp. Ohio prison officials have agreed to take over monitoring Turner, and he is required to register as a sex offender with Greene County Sheriff Gene Fischer. He will have to report to a probation officer for three years and must avoid alcohol and drugs during that time. He will be subjected to random drug and alcohol tests and required to attend substance abuse counseling. He is required to pay his victim restitution, which has not yet been determined. Most significant, he is required to register as a sex offender for life.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO REGISTER AS A SEX OFFENDER?

He must complete a sex-offender counseling class for one to three years. He cannot live near schools, parks and other places where children congregate. He will be barred from working with children in any capacity. He will be required to submit to random polygraph tests and waive patient-counselor confidentiality privileges. His name, photo and address will be publicly available on Ohio’s online sex offender registry. The local sheriff plans to send postcards to Turner’s neighbors informing them that a sex offender has moved in nearby. Turner has to check in with the sheriff every three months and is subject to random searches of his home. He must seek permission from law enforcement to travel out of state, lawyers say.

IS TURNER APPEALING HIS CONVICTION?

Turner’s trial lawyer indicated he would. Court records show Solomon Robert Wollack is representing Turner through the Sixth District Appellate Program, which provides court-appointed appeals attorneys to defendants who can’t afford them. Wollack said the appeals court has not yet received the trial record, “so we are still very early in the process at this time.” He declined further comment.

— Paul Elias, Associated Press

Brock Turner emerged pre-dawn Friday from a California jail to a throng of journalists and a spectator who shouted, “Loser!”

The 21-year-old ex-Oakwood swimmer and sexual offender hopped in the back of a white sport utility vehicle and slammed the door. He was silent as he began the journey back to Ohio, which he must make within five days of release in order to register here as a sex offender and begin his three years of parole.

Hours later the protests began outside the jail and, later, outside his home in Sugarcreek Twp., where Turner has asked and received permission to live with his parents.

He re-entered society with shaggy hair, a wrinkled shirt and a large packet of mail clutched under his arm.

“I don’t think there’s any definable, actual threats,” said Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith before Turner’s release, “but there’s a lot of hate.”

He later emerged from the sport utility vehicle in a hooded sweatshirt and sunglasses, which he wore as television cameras followed him and his parents inside the lobby of a Palo Alto hotel. Asked if he wished to apologize, Turner said nothing.

The protests in California were largely aimed not at Turner, but at Judge Aaron Persky, who sentenced the ex-Stanford University student to six months jail time following his conviction in the sexual assault of an unconscious, intoxicated woman on campus in January 2015.

Like many California inmates, Turner served half his sentence due to the state’s rules of good behavior. His time inside jail, Smith said, was spent in protective custody alongside inmates charged with homicide.

Protest leaders in California, including a cohort of U.S. Congress members, urged Persky to resign or face a November 2017 recall election for which support is already building.

“We come here today because there is no justice in the light sentence and early release of Brock Turner,” said U.S. Rep Eric Swalwell, D-Calif. “But we come here together to find justice in the early release of Judge Persky.”

Outside the Turner residence Friday evening, a newspaper sat unopened in the driveway as about a dozen protesters and roughly twice as many reporters stood at the neck of the cul de sac.

A Cincinnati news chopper circled overhead as a neighbor mowed his grass.

“You’ve got to be kidding me,” said another neighbor as he looked up.

About a block away, neighbors chatted with Sugarcreek Twp. Police Chief Michael Brown, who declined to comment, as a police sergeant watched the armed protesters through a pair of binoculars. Another neighbor walked up to a front porch with a case of Miller Light.

Michele Landis Dauber, the Stanford Law professor who is running the effort to unseat Persky, told the Dayton Daily News earlier this week she did not endorse vigilantism.

“I completely understand caring about the judge more than him,” said protester Daniel Hardin, of Vandalia, with an M4 assault rifle around his shoulder. “But that doesn’t mean we’re going to forget about him.”

Asked if he had anything else to add, Hardin briefly paused.

“Welcome back home, Brock.”

KTVU-TV and the Associated Press in San Francisco contributed reporting.

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Trial delay likely for man at center of 30-hour Liberty Twp. standoff

Published: Sunday, June 24, 2018 @ 6:00 PM

A July trial is scheduled for Donald Gazaway, a Cincinnati man facing multiple charges in connection with a 30-hour standoff in Liberty Twp. in which he allegedly held a 10-year-old hostage.

A trial is scheduled next month for a Cincinnati man facing multiple charges in connection with a 30-hour standoff in which he allegedly held a 10-year-old hostage may not happen.

MORE: Liberty Twp.’s 30-hour standoff: How it unfolded

Donald T. Gazaway, 31, was charged with kidnapping, felonious assault and inducing panic after the incident that started Jan. 12 at a Liberty Twp. apartment in the Springs at Liberty Township complex located off Hamilton Mason Road.

A Butler County grand jury handed down an indictment with additional charges of aggravated burglary, aggravated robbery and two counts of having weapons under disability.

Gazaway, who is being held in jail on a $1,001,000 bond, was in Butler County Common Pleas Court last week for a final hearing before his July 7 trial.

MORE: Standoff suspect served 4 years for firing a gun in to a crowd of 30

Defense attorney David Albrecht told Judge Charles Pater that at this point here is no reason to set another hearing before the four-day trial.

But on Wednesday, defense attorney Lawrence Hawkins III filed a motion for a trial continuance stating that he had been retained to represent Gazaway “and there is need for time to review the evidence.”

Gazaway will be back Judge Charles Pater’s courtroom on Tuesday for a hearing on a motion to continue the trial.

Detectives say Gazaway was let into the apartment and there was an altercation. The adults, including the alleged hostage’s mother, fled. But Gazaway took the child hostage before surrendering hours later, according to police.

MORE: Police: No evidence of foul play after body found in Millikin Woods

Detective Joe Nerlinger said during a previous court hearing that about 25 bullet casings were removed from the scene and that Gazaway fired the majority of the shots from the apartment before moving to the garage with the child.

When taken into custody, three guns were found with Gazaway, Nerlinger testified. Live rounds were also found.

The child was not physically injured, according to the sheriff’s office, though officers said they saw Gazaway use the boy as a shield. That, they said, prevented them from making any movement toward the residence.

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Police: Man shot in Dayton, 1 suspect in custody

Published: Sunday, June 24, 2018 @ 1:30 AM
Updated: Sunday, June 24, 2018 @ 11:54 AM

Police have one man in custody after a man was shot in Dayton Sunday.

>>Officer-involved shooting is Kettering’s third within a year

Multiple crews arrived to the scene where a victim was found with at least one gunshot wound in the 1500 block of Meriline Avenue around 12:50 a.m., according to Sgt. Kyle B. Thomas of the Dayton Police Department.

Police had several witnesses that lead them to two male suspects after investigating. One suspect is in custody, said Thomas.

>>WATCH: Police shocked during scuffle in Dayton, officers injured

The victim was transported to Miami Valley Hospital by medics with non-life threatening injuries. 

He was later released but has not been cooperative with investigators, according to Thomas.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

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Amber Alert canceled after 2 Urbana boys found safe; suspect still sought

Published: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 11:15 AM
Updated: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 12:08 PM

Suspect sought after Amber Alert issued

UPDATE @ 12:08 p.m.:

An Amber Alert has been canceled after two Urbana boys were found safe.

The suspect and vehicle still have not been found.

FIRST REPORT

An Amber Alert is active for two boys reported abducted from Urbana.

They were reported missing at 7 a.m. from Maplewood Circle after their grandparents awoke to find them gone, according to a release from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office.

The first boy is Justin Wallace Jr., 7, a biracial boy with black hair who stands 4 feet 5 inches and weighs 72 pounds. There was no further descriptive information available.

The second boy is Aaron Rollins, 9, a white boy with brown hair and hazel eyes who stands 4 feet, 11 inches and weighs 72 pounds. He was last seen wearing a maroon and white T-shirt and camo high-top tennis shoes.

VIEW MORE CRIME NEWS

The suspect, Jamie Rollins, 39, is the non-custodial mother. She is believed to be driving a taupe Kia Optima with Ohio plates 347YSL. She is described as a white woman with red hair and blue eyes who stands 5 feet 3 inches and weighs 223 pounds.

Anyone with information on their whereabouts or who spots them is urged to call 911.

For more information visit the Ohio Amber Alert website.

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Fairfield police ID victims in officer-involved shooting

Published: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 5:06 PM


            Nick Graham/Staff
Nick Graham/Staff

It wasn’t the first time officers had been called to a Fairfield apartment where police said Friday they confronted and killed a man as he stabbed a woman, records show.

And the same home in the 1500 block of Gelhot Drive was the site of an earlier complaint by the woman claiming the man — who is described in police records as her boyfriend — had tried to poison her.

That’s according to new information released to this media outlet Saturday by Fairfield Police in the aftermath of one of their officers shooting to death the male suspect, who has now been identified along with the female victim, who died from her stab wounds.

The Butler County Coroner’s office released a statement saying the stabbing victim was 37-year-old Michelle R. Henry. Logan A. Willliamson, 37, died at the scene after being shot by Fairfield Police as he was stabbing Henry. Henry later died at Mercy Hospital-Fairfield.

MORE: Fairfield man, woman dead after police gun him down during knife attack

The first Fairfield officer on the scene, identified as Officer Bryan Carnes, a three-year veteran, allegedly found Williamson stabbing Henry inside the townhouse.

In an attempt to stop the stabbing, Carnes fired two shots, striking Williamson. He was pronounced dead at the scene, said Fairfield Police Chief Steve Maynard.

Police records show officers had previously been called to respond to the couple’s address in September 2017 on a domestic violence report where Williamson was arrested for attacking Henry.

Henry told officers “her boyfriend tried to poison her by placing (sic) dissolvable sleeping pills in her mouth while she was sleeping.”

Police records also showed that in recent years Williamson had been arrested for fleeing police after speeding, carrying alcohol and a weapon in a car on another occasion.

And the woman’s family members had asked police to stop at the address last year to check on Henry, saying they had not heard from her for an extended time.

Dispatchers received the 911 call for the incident at 5:49 a.m. Friday at a townhouse located in a quiet neighborhood off Pleasant Avenue. A female caller blurted out the address then continues to scream for help during the three-minute, 20-second call.

“He’s stabbing me!” the woman screams once.

The dispatcher continues to ask the woman to repeat the address.

“Please yell your address to me so I can send help,” the dispatcher says. “Shout your address, your apartment number.”

One of the officers says: “I heard someone yell ‘help!’”

When Officer Bryan Carnes and Sgt. Aaron Meyer got to the residence, they forced entry and ran up the steps, Maynard said.

“(They) made their way to an upstairs bathroom where they encountered a male and a female. The male was stabbing the female. Officer Bryan Carnes, who was the first officer to make it to the bathroom, fired several rounds from his pistol striking the male and stopping the initial threat,” Maynard said during a press conference four hours after the incident.

Henry was transported to Mercy Fairfield Hospital where she died, according to police. Williamson died at the scene.

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation has taken over the investigation, Maynard said. As is standard procedure, the two officers are on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of that investigation.

The chief said there is body camera footage of the incident and once BCI and the Butler County Prosecutor’s Office “deems appropriate, we will release it.”

Carnes is a three-year veteran of the force. He previously worked for Englewood Police Department, north of Dayton, according to the chief. He received a good review in October, with the preparer stating, “Officer Carnes is a very well rounded officer who has taken on additional responsibilities within the organization. He is an asset to the department.”

Butler County Prosecutor Michael Gmoser said the incident will be presented to a grand jury of review when the investigation is completed. It is Gmoser’s policy that all officer involved shootings are presented to a grand jury.

(Staff writer Michael D. Clark contributed to this story)

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