BRUNCH BILL: Backers of earlier Sunday alcohol sales launch campaign

Published: Thursday, September 14, 2017 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Thursday, October 26, 2017 @ 8:19 PM

Voters in a downtown Dayton precinct will vote in November on a ballot issue that would allow bars and restaurants to begin serving alcohol at 10 a.m. rather than 11 a.m. FILE
Voters in a downtown Dayton precinct will vote in November on a ballot issue that would allow bars and restaurants to begin serving alcohol at 10 a.m. rather than 11 a.m. FILE

A coalition of downtown Dayton businesses and the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce are putting together a campaign to urge voters in one downtown precinct to allow bars and restaurants in that precinct to start serving alcohol at 10 a.m. instead of 11 a.m. on Sundays.

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The issue — which supporters have dubbed the “brunch bill,” and which will appear as Local Issue 11 on the ballot — will be decided by voters in Precinct 1-B in downtown Dayton. There are about 1,100 registered voters in precinct 1-B, which includes the business strip of the Oregon District on East Fifth Street as well as the area around the Cannery and part of the Water Street development. It does not include the residential neighborhood just south of the Oregon District strip on East Fifth Street, which is part of another precinct.

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“The pendulum for downtown Dayton is on the upswing right now, and we want to keep that momentum going,” said Chris Kershner, vice president of public policy and economic development for the Dayton chamber.

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Kershner said several downtown Dayton restaurants approached chamber officials about seeking the change, and the chamber spearheaded the petition drive to place the issue on the fall ballot. A “yes” vote will allow the one-hour-earlier start time only at those alcohol-permit holders in precinct 1-B, and would have no impact on other restaurants and bars outside of the precinct.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Dayton restaurants seek change in Sunday alcohol start time

Kershner said supporters are concerned about the ballot language as written by the Ohio Secretary of State’s office, because it doesn’t make clear that a “yes” vote would simply move the start time for Sunday alcohol sales from the current 11 a.m. state-mandated start time to 10 a.m. Some voters may read the language and think the measure would allow Sunday alcohol sales for the first time, Kershner said.

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Here’s how Issue 11 will appear on the ballot of voters in precinct 1-B:

“Shall the sale of intoxicating liquor, of the same type as may be legally sold in this precinct on other days of the week, be permitted in this Dayton 1-B Precinct for consumption on premises where sold between the hours of 10 a.m. and midnight on Sunday?”

The “vote yes” campaign will focus on education rather than advocacy, Kershner said, to make sure voters know a “yes” vote simply allows for the one-hour-earlier start time on Sundays.

Steve Tieber, owner of the Dublin Pub at East Fifth Street and Wayne Avenue, said Sunday sales are important to his restaurant and to many other alcohol-permit holders in downtown Dayton.

“Sunday is our third-busiest day,” behind only Friday and Saturday, Tieber said of the Dublin Pub. And most of the pub’s Sunday sales are related to its brunch service.

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Restaurant owners told chamber officials it is frustrating to be forced to refuse customer orders of brunch cocktails such as Bloody Marys and mimosas during what for some is the first hour of their brunch service. The change will give restaurants more flexibility, boost sales and ultimately create and preserve jobs, Tieber said.

The precinct has about 1,100 voters. Kershner and Tieber are helping to put together a grass-roots campaign led by retailers and other “brunch bill” coalition members, which number about 20 and include the Downtown Dayton Partnership and the chamber.

“We’ll do mailings, yard signs, banners — anything to get the word out,” Kershner said.

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1 injured when Jeep rams into house on South Bird Road in Clark County

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 1:23 PM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 1:36 PM

1 injured when Jeep rams into Clark County house

UPDATE @ 1:27 p.m.: One person has been taken to a hospital after a Jeep rammed into a house on South Bird Road, the Ohio State Highway Patrol said. 

According to the preliminary investigation, a female was driving north when she apparently lost control of the vehicle and rammed the front of the house, where the resident was asleep. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: New details in fatal wrong-way crash

That resident has been taken to Springfield Regional Medical Center, suffering from minor injuries. The driver was not injured, according to troopers. 

South Bird Road will be shut down at Laybourne Road in both directions until further notice.

INITIAL REPORT

Police, sheriff’s deputies, OSP and the gas company are on the scene of a car into a house in the 200 block of South Bird and Laybourne roads in Springfield Twp.

The incident occurred moments ago. Unknown on injuries.

We will update this developing report as we get information.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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Eva Longoria, husband Jose Bastón welcome baby boy

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 10:38 AM

What You Need To Know: Eva Longoria

Actress Eva Longoria and her husband, media mogul José Bastón, welcomed their first child together Tuesday, June 19.

Giving the first photo of her son to HOLA! USA, the actress can be seen cradling Santiago Enrique Bastón. He was born at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles weighing 6 pounds and 13 ounces.

>> Read more trending news 

“We are so grateful for this beautiful blessing,” the couple told the publication.

Throughout her pregnancy, the 43-year-old actress stayed busy. Posts on her Instagram page show her at various events and working on multiple projects. During that time, she also got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and had to say goodbye to her beloved dog, Jinxy, June 14.

Longoria confirmed her pregnancy in December, when she was four months along.

Santiago is the first child for Longoria. Bastón, 50, president of Televisa, the largest media company in Latin America, has three children of his own from an earlier marriage.

Bastón and Longoria started dating in 2013 and married three years later in Valle de Bravo, Mexico.

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Spooky Nook developer gets millions in tax credits for Champion Mill rehab

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 12:55 PM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 4:13 PM


            The proposed Spooky Nook Sports at Champion Mill mega-sports complex could fill the old Champion Mill building along B Street in Hamilton. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF
The proposed Spooky Nook Sports at Champion Mill mega-sports complex could fill the old Champion Mill building along B Street in Hamilton. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

A project expected to be the biggest driver of economic development in the region will get nearly $5 million in state tax credits.

The Ohio Development Services Agency awarded just under $4.7 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit credits to Spooky Nook Sports for rehabilitation of the former paper mill in Hamilton.

The rehabilitation project will convert the huge industrial building at 600 N. B St. into a hotel and event center that will complement Spooky Nook’s planned indoor sports complex — Spooky Nook at Champion Mill, which is projected to create tens of millions of dollars in economic impact each year throughout Hamilton and the surrounding area.

MORE: Spooky Nook founder: No matter what funding occurs ‘we’re not walking away’ from Hamilton

Spooky Nook Sports at Champion Mill is expected to break ground along North B Street and the west shore of the Great Miami River later this year in advance of a 2020 opening. Total cost of the project is expected to exceed $48 million.

“The credit is very significant to the project,” said Mike Dollard, Spooky Nook’s chief financial officer. “It is doing exactly as the program was designed: to revitalize communities, stimulate economic growth, and fill in the financial gaps in these projects. We are grateful to the State of Ohio and the City of Hamilton for their support and vision.”

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The capital stack supporting the project is nearly complete and Spooky Nook officials anticipate it wrapping up shortly, according to spokeswoman Mackenzie Bender.

“With the external remediation almost finished, we remain focused on a late summer start on additional site work,” Bender said.

Hamilton City Manager Joshua Smith said receiving the State of Ohio Historical Tax Credits was an important hurdle for moving the Spooky Nook mixed-use project forward.

“As any post-industrial city will confirm, repurposing industrial buildings that are functionally obsolete into a new use, while retaining huge components of the historic fabric, is a near-impossible task,” Smith said.

He credited Cleveland-based Sandvick Architects, Steve Coon of Historic Developers and the entire Spooky Nook team for working their way through the lengthy application process, which lasted for at least a year.

MORE: The massive Hamilton sports complex project could be game-changing. Especially for this neighborhood.

The final hurdle, he said, is confirming a $7 million allocation of New Markets Tax Credits, which along with historic tax credits, are crucial in projects where redevelopment costs exceed existing value.

“Hamilton continues to fight above our weight class,” Smith said. “It’s never one person or organization that continues to move us forward, but an all-out, maximum team effort.”

The Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program is administered in partnership with the Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office. The State Historic Preservation Office determines if a property qualifies as a historic building and that the rehabilitation plans comply with the U.S. Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation.

The tax credits for the Champion Mill site are part of $30,228,955 in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits announced Wednesday for the rehabilitation of 31 historic buildings.

MORE: A huge new project wouldn’t just help Hamilton. The sports center’s impact would reverberate for miles.

Together, the projects are expected to leverage approximately $348 million in private investment in 13 communities. The awards bring the total number of Ohio communities with historic preservation tax credit projects to 67.

“An old building can be a blemish or a promise for the future,” said David Goodman, director of the Ohio Development Services Agency. “These communities have chosen an economic boost for the future.”

Champion Paper No. 2 Mill was one of several buildings associated with Champion Paper’s operations in Hamilton.

The mill, once the largest coated-paper mill in the world, operated for more than 100 years as one of the city’s largest employers, before International Paper acquired all Champion International assets and assumed ownership of the Hamilton plant and its 800 employees in 2000.

International announced the sale of the local mill to a Florida merchant banking firm, Smart Papers, in January 2001 and Smart Papers wound down operations at the site in 2012.

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UPDATE: Gun powder in homemade bottle bomb found along MetroPark bike path

Published: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 12:59 PM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 3:54 PM

MetroParks rangers are investigating after a homemade bottle bomb was found along a bike path in the Island MetroPark Tuesday morning.

UPDATE @ 3:55 p.m. (June 20): Red Dot gun powder has been identified by Dayton Bomb Squad members as the substance in the bottle bomb found Tuesday, said Mark Hess, Five Rivers MetroParks public safety chief.

Investigators have no additional information or suspects, Hess said.

Alliant Red Dot gun powder is the brand name for a smokeless powder used primarily for light and standard 12 gauge target loads, but can be used in some handgun loads, according to midwayusa.com (Midway Arms, Inc.)

INITIAL REPORT (June 19)

MetroParks rangers are investigating after a homemade bottle bomb was found along a bike path in the Island MetroPark Tuesday morning. 

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Rangers responded to the bike path near Kettering Field about 11 a.m. after a park technician found the device during a routine patrol, said Lt. Mark Arendt, Five Rivers MetroParks, Ranger Division. 

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The device was found partially burned and was apparently filled with a black powder, Arendt said. 

Marshall Gorby/Staff

Rangers were not sure how long the bottle was there or when it was initially detonated. 

“It’s a very dangerous situation,” Arendt said. “We wouldn’t want someone to stumble upon this and get hurt. Or we wouldn’t want the person actually messing around with this device to get hurt either.” 

The bottle and powder will be analyzed to determine what the device actually contained, Arendt said. 

No injuries were reported. 

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