Fire claims male’s life in New Miami

Published: Thursday, December 14, 2017 @ 8:40 AM
Updated: Thursday, December 14, 2017 @ 10:48 AM

New Miami Fatal House Fire

UPDATE @ 10:20 a.m.

A frantic call was placed today by the niece of a man killed in a house fire this morning stating her was disabled in inside the ranch home.

“The house across the street is on fire,” the woman told 911 0perators. When the dispatcher asked if anyone was inside, she replied, ” Yeah, my uncle … he is disabled, he only has one leg.”

The woman said her uncle was in the bedroom.

“Just please hurry,” she said while crying.

Fatal house fire in St. Clair Township

UPDATE @ 9:20 a.m.

A male who died in a fire this morning in the New Miami was found by first responders in the front room of the residence on Tecumseh Drive, according to the Butler County Sheriff’s Office.

Preliminary investigation appears that the fire originated in the front room but the exact cause is unknown at this time. The State Fire Marshal’s Office has been called to the scene .

INITIAL REPORT

A fatal fire in New Miami has claimed the life of one person this morning, according to Butler County dispatchers.

The fire broke out on Tecumseh Drive just after 7 a.m. Thursday. Dispatchers said emergency crews are still on the scene but no other information is available.

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Dayton’s newest mosque to open; public and international guests expected

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 1:09 PM


            Retired Imam Celal Shahin stands inside the Osman Gazi mosque at 1508 Valley St. The mosque hosts its grand opening on Sunday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
Retired Imam Celal Shahin stands inside the Osman Gazi mosque at 1508 Valley St. The mosque hosts its grand opening on Sunday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The first official Ahiska Turkish mosque in many years has a grand opening in Old North Dayton on Sunday that is expected to attract dignitaries from across the globe and that is a testament to the strong growth of the local Turkish population.

But the Osman Gazi Mosque and Sunday’s celebration aren’t just for Turkish people or Muslims, leaders say.

The mosque, located at 1508 Valley St., is a public place that welcomes the entire community, and the goal is to unite people with interfaith events and activities, said Mirza Mirza, who is the secretary on Osman Gazi’s board of directors.

“We want to create something that is multicultural, multilingual, and gets everyone together,” he said.

MORE: Dayton sells former rec center to Ahiska Turkish community leaders

Osman Gazi’s grand opening is at 1 p.m. Sunday, and festivities include a picnic in a park owned by the mosque and a prayer service.

Local leaders, out-of-town guests and religious representatives and consul from Turkey will be in attendance. The public is invited and encouraged to come.

People have prayed at the Valley Street building since it was first purchased by Osman Gazi in 2014. The building was formerly a funeral home that had been vacant for years.

But using donations, Osman Gazi has transformed what was an eyesore into an eye-catching house of worship.

The exterior of the building is turquoise, with green trim. The inside has Ottoman Empire-style designs, featuring colorful tile and turquoise carpet that were hand-crafted in Turkey.

A gold chandelier hangs from the ceiling. On the ceiling is written the “99 names of god.”

The walls are covered in calligraphy, and entryway arches have been painted to resemble roman stone.

More than $500,000 was invested into the prayer spaces, and that doesn’t count other projects.

“We tried to put a 1,000-year history in this house,” Mirza said.

Osman Gazi’s investment in that part of Old North Dayton is far from over.

Leaders purchased an old church building across the street that it is using as a school .

The school hosts Saturday and Sunday classes for children on the Koran and Islam. Right now, the school is open only to Turkish children and a couple of kids from Somalia.

MORE: Dayton Children’s assists young man’s hopes for soccer team in Old North Dayton

But once the building is renovated, possibly by next year, classes will be opened up to everyone, Mirza said. Also, the school plans to host after-school programming, such as sport leagues and other recreational activities.

The church and school have a significant amount of green space that leaders hope to use for barbecues and other community events.

The mosque has taken years to build because there were fewer Ahiska Turkish families in the Dayton region several years ago, and families often have limited incomes shortly after relocating here, Mirza said.

But the Dayton area has more than 1,000 Ahiska Turkish families now, according to some estimates, that is concentrated in Old North Dayton.

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Daryl vs. Darryl: Dayton City Commission candidates square off before May election

Published: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 @ 9:00 PM

Moderator Jim Otte talks with Dayton City Commission candidate Darryl Fairchild while moderator Etana Jacobi talks with candidate Daryl Ward.
Moderator Jim Otte talks with Dayton City Commission candidate Darryl Fairchild while moderator Etana Jacobi talks with candidate Daryl Ward.

Daryl Ward and Darryl Fairchild have some things in common. They are both pastors of more than 30 years who are running as Democrats to be the next Dayton city commissioner.

On May 8, Dayton voters will elect one of the two to serve as the newest city commissioner, replacing Joey Williams, who resigned two months ago.

Despite the similarities, Ward and Fairchild at a Tuesday debate tried to show the public that there are important differences in their core priorities and that they are the best person for the job.

Fairchild, the manager of chaplain services at Dayton Children’s Hospital, portrays himself as a strong voice and advocate for the city’s neighborhoods, which he says have been overlooked and desperately need a comprehensive revitalization plan.

Fairchild said unlike his opponent, he’ll be ready to lead from “day No. 1” because of his experience in community organizing, nonprofit work and what he says is a thorough understanding of the political process and main issues facing the city.

Ward, the senior pastor at Omega Baptist Church, depicted himself as a a servant of the community who has a special talent for working with people to get things done.

He said he is running for office because he cares deeply about the community and understands how collaboration can fix Dayton’s pressing problems. He said education is the largest problem outside of City Hall.

“I work hard at what I do,” he said. He later said, “I can bring hope, I can bring light and I’ve done that throughout my career in Dayton.”

Ward and Fairchild talked about their views and plans if elected during a wide-ranging debate at Stivers School for the Arts.

The event, which drew more than 150 visitors, was sponsored by the Dayton Daily News, WHIO-TV and Radio and the League of Women Voters of the Greater Dayton Area.

Ward said he will fight for the city and people of Dayton that he loves. He didn’t offer many specifics about what he might do on the commission.

But he said he has the determination and work ethic to make a difference.

Darryl Fairchild running for Dayton Commission

And he said he would work closely with commissioners to come up with ways to improve neighborhoods and would collaborate with the Dayton Public Schools to improve the quality of local education.

“We have to work together to bring hope — I really believe in this place,” he said.

He said he doesn’t have all the answers but will bring citizens together to figure out solutions to problems like hunger in the community and disinvestment in west Dayton.

VOTERS GUIDE: Compare the Dayton Commission candidates on the issues

Fairchild said the current commission acts in lockstep and he would be the independent voice the commission needs to bring new ideas and spark healthy debate.

Many city neighborhoods are in rough shape because because the city does not have a clear vision and plan for their revitalization and reinvestment, said Fairchild.

Daryl Ward running for Dayton Commission

“People don’t want to invest in Dayton primarily because they don’t know where we’re going,” he said. “We have a great plan for downtown, but that’s only 7 percent of our whole city. What about the other 93 percent?”

Fairchild said he would be an accessible elected leader. He accused the city of putting up roadblocks when constituents come to air grievances.

Fairchild said too many people don’t feel safe in their neighborhoods and don’t believe their neighborhoods are a good place to raise a family.

“That is unacceptable to me,” he said. “When I’m elected, I’ll bring urgency to address these issues, and I’ll be a champion for our residents and neighborhoods.”

Other topics on Tuesday night included Good Samaritan Hospital’s closure and food access.

An audience member asked the candidates if they would be willing to stand up to Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, if needed.

Ward said he is willing to work with, and willing to stand up against, anyone if need be.

Fairchild said he is willing to speak truth to power and stand up for what’s right, even if it’s unpopular.

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New tax law may allow early filers to obtain extra money 

Published: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 @ 7:55 PM

New tax law may allow early filers to obtain extra money

If you filed your taxes before Feb. 9th of this year, there is a chance you may be able to obtain extra money thanks to the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. 

Enacted on the 9th, the new tax law extended the date for many benefits, including a mortgage insurance deduction. 

Both private mortgage insurance (PMI) and mortgage insurance premiums (MIP) are included in this deduction (but not homeowners or hazard insurance), which was recently added to the tax code by state governments. 

A tuition & fees deduction, home energy credit, energy-efficient vehicle credit, and energy-efficient vehicle charging station credit were also recently added to the tax code because of the Bipartisan act. 

Tax experts say those who filed taxes on their own may be unaware of these breaks, but can file an amended return within a three year time frame.  

Amended returns can only be filed by mail, and may take up to 16 weeks for processing. 

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Darke County Jail officers overcome when exposed to unknown white powder

Published: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 @ 6:39 PM
Updated: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 @ 7:13 PM

Jail bars.
Jail bars.

A criminal investigation has started into an incident at the Darke County Jail that sent four corrections officers to a hospital Tuesday after they were exposed to a white, powdery substance that fell from the possession of a man who was being booked into the facility.

The four officers have been treated at Wayne Healthcare and released. The man at the center of the incident also was treated at the same hospital. He has been released to the Ohio Adult Parole Authority.

Some of the corrections officers exposed to the substance were treated with Narcan during the incident, according to a statement from the Darke County Sheriff’s Chief Deputy Mark Whittaker.

The incident began when Greenville police brought Stephen A. Garner Jr., 37, to the jail about 1 p.m. so he could be booked into the facility on a violation. 

While being searched, multiple plastic baggies containing a white, powdery substance dropped from Garner's body. 

He attempted to retrieve the items from the floor while corrections officers ordered him to stop, exposing himself and the officers to the substance. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Resident held at gunpoint in Kettering home invasion 

Deputies and corrections officers were able to secure Garner in a holding cell after the incident. 

The corrections officers who were exposed began feeling ill, Whittaker said. Garner lapsed into unconscious and became unresponsive. 

Greenville Twp. Fire and Rescue was dispatched. 

The jail was locked down and out of service for approximately 2 hours during the investigation and decontamination process.

No other inmates were at risk.

Samples of the substance will be sent to the crime lab for processing and identification, Whittaker said. 

Once the investigation is completed, it will be forwarded to the county prosecutor for review.

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