$1M+ endorsed for companies planning to create 121 new jobs

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 10:42 AM

A two-story interior section of the Third Street Dayton Arcade. The city of Dayton Friday pulled a request for $1 million in Montgomery County ED/GE funding to redevelop the arcade — but another funding request is expected in the spring. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
A two-story interior section of the Third Street Dayton Arcade. The city of Dayton Friday pulled a request for $1 million in Montgomery County ED/GE funding to redevelop the arcade — but another funding request is expected in the spring. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Plans by a Canadian company to build its North American headquarters in Vandalia, creating 35 new jobs, emerged as a clear favorite Friday among a committee of Montgomery County officials weighing requests for public funds.

In total, all the development projects the committee considered are expected to create 121 new jobs while protecting 709 existing jobs.

The committee decided which projects they would like to see funded and by how much. The next step is a vote by the County Commission, which usually approves the recommendations.

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Eight local communities asked for more than $1.42 million to boost business moves within or to those communities. One problem: The county only had only a little over $1 million to offer in what the county calls the “ED/GE” (Economic Development/Government Equity) program.

But when the city of Dayton withdrew its request for $1 million to support the remaking of its historical downtown arcade, the landscape immediately changed.

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“That should make this committee’s work just a little bit easier,” said Joe Tuss, county administrator.

Ford Weber, development director for the city of Dayton, said city staff wasn’t yet ready with projected construction costs and other preparatory work.

“This is a very complex project with historic buildings,” Weber said, adding: “This is our No. 1 economic development priority.”

A request from Dayton for the arcade will likely return in the ED/GE program’s spring funding round. Tuss said the county will have $2 million allocated for the program next year.

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Vandalia request $400,000 for MSW to help with renovations at 6161 Ventnor Ave.

MSW is an Ontario-based plastic extrusion company. The company was recently ranked No. 83 on a business magazine’s list of the fastest growing Canadian companies.

The project represents direct foreign investment in the Dayton area, much like Hematite in Englewood and Fuyao in Moraine, noted Chris Kershner, an executive with the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce.

“I want to see more of those,” Kershner said.

Erik Collins said MSW is researching the local building, and he didn’t know if failure to get the full requested $400,000 would cause the company to look elsewhere.

Dan Foley, Montgomery County commissioner, suggested setting aside $300,000 for MSW, a number that was later bumped up to $320,000.

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Other ED/GE projects approved Friday, and the amounts those companies are slated to receive include:

N12Technologies Inc. was recommended to get $50,000 in a project that would create 10 jobs in Kettering. Also in Kettering, Northwestern Tools was recommended for $80,000 for a project that is expected to create 12 jobs and protect 25 current jobs.

The city of Centerville asked for $250,000 for Aeroseal, to create an expected 19 new jobs at the former Planet Ford dealership site on East Alex-Bell Road. The committee recommended $170,000.

In Huber Heights, the committee recommended $80,000 for Trimble, which wants to build a new workspace to facilitate testing and demonstration of products when the weather is poor.

Staco Energy Corp. was recommended for $150,000 for a $7 million project would create four new jobs and retain 62 existing ones.

A new Misumi USA distribution center in West Carrollton tied to Dayton Progress was recommended for $150,000. That project is expected to create 20 new jobs.

And in Harrison Twp., $75,000 was recommended for Staub Manufacturing Solutions, which wants to create six new jobs while retaining 28 current ones.

Since 2012, ED/GE-funded projects have created 4,718 new local jobs total — above the 2,058 jobs those employers had originally pledged — and retained 2,931 existing jobs, Collins said.

In that time, $6 million in ED/GE funding has resulted in $452 million in private investment in the Dayton area, he said.

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Dayton fire recruit allegedly involved in bar fight

Published: Sunday, April 15, 2018 @ 10:21 AM

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A 23-year-old Dayton Fire Department recruit was accused of punching someone at Timothy’s Bar & Grill on Brown Street near UD, according to a police report.

A University of Dayton student stopped police that were patrolling the area around Timothy’s and told officers his friend was assaulted inside the business, the report states.

Police spoke with the suspect who said he was talking to a girl at the bar when someone tried to hit him, the report states.

He said he wasn’t sure what was going on and started swinging back and was not sure if he hit anyone. He told police he was a recruit for the fire department.

Timothy’s staff told police they saw the offender hit the victim in the back of the head and then escorted him from the bar. The victim had trouble articulating what happened, and all parties were intoxicated, the police report states.

The suspect was summons arrested for misdemeanor assault and the victim was ordered to the prosecutor’s office, the report states. 

Earlier this year, a Dayton firefighter, Jacob Freels, was arrested on suspicion of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and driving while intoxicated, which was his third arrest for OVI in the last four years, records showed.

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Dayton’s newest mosque to open; public and international guests expected

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 1:09 PM


            Retired Imam Celal Shahin stands inside the Osman Gazi mosque at 1508 Valley St. The mosque hosts its grand opening on Sunday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
Retired Imam Celal Shahin stands inside the Osman Gazi mosque at 1508 Valley St. The mosque hosts its grand opening on Sunday. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The first official Ahiska Turkish mosque in many years has a grand opening in Old North Dayton on Sunday that is expected to attract dignitaries from across the globe and that is a testament to the strong growth of the local Turkish population.

But the Osman Gazi Mosque and Sunday’s celebration aren’t just for Turkish people or Muslims, leaders say.

The mosque, located at 1508 Valley St., is a public place that welcomes the entire community, and the goal is to unite people with interfaith events and activities, said Mirza Mirza, who is the secretary on Osman Gazi’s board of directors.

“We want to create something that is multicultural, multilingual, and gets everyone together,” he said.

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Osman Gazi’s grand opening is at 1 p.m. Sunday, and festivities include a picnic in a park owned by the mosque and a prayer service.

Local leaders, out-of-town guests and religious representatives and consul from Turkey will be in attendance. The public is invited and encouraged to come.

People have prayed at the Valley Street building since it was first purchased by Osman Gazi in 2014. The building was formerly a funeral home that had been vacant for years.

But using donations, Osman Gazi has transformed what was an eyesore into an eye-catching house of worship.

The exterior of the building is turquoise, with green trim. The inside has Ottoman Empire-style designs, featuring colorful tile and turquoise carpet that were hand-crafted in Turkey.

A gold chandelier hangs from the ceiling. On the ceiling is written the “99 names of god.”

The walls are covered in calligraphy, and entryway arches have been painted to resemble roman stone.

More than $500,000 was invested into the prayer spaces, and that doesn’t count other projects.

“We tried to put a 1,000-year history in this house,” Mirza said.

Osman Gazi’s investment in that part of Old North Dayton is far from over.

Leaders purchased an old church building across the street that it is using as a school .

The school hosts Saturday and Sunday classes for children on the Koran and Islam. Right now, the school is open only to Turkish children and a couple of kids from Somalia.

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But once the building is renovated, possibly by next year, classes will be opened up to everyone, Mirza said. Also, the school plans to host after-school programming, such as sport leagues and other recreational activities.

The church and school have a significant amount of green space that leaders hope to use for barbecues and other community events.

The mosque has taken years to build because there were fewer Ahiska Turkish families in the Dayton region several years ago, and families often have limited incomes shortly after relocating here, Mirza said.

But the Dayton area has more than 1,000 Ahiska Turkish families now, according to some estimates, that is concentrated in Old North Dayton.

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Daryl vs. Darryl: Dayton City Commission candidates square off before May election

Published: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 @ 9:00 PM

Moderator Jim Otte talks with Dayton City Commission candidate Darryl Fairchild while moderator Etana Jacobi talks with candidate Daryl Ward.
Moderator Jim Otte talks with Dayton City Commission candidate Darryl Fairchild while moderator Etana Jacobi talks with candidate Daryl Ward.

Daryl Ward and Darryl Fairchild have some things in common. They are both pastors of more than 30 years who are running as Democrats to be the next Dayton city commissioner.

On May 8, Dayton voters will elect one of the two to serve as the newest city commissioner, replacing Joey Williams, who resigned two months ago.

Despite the similarities, Ward and Fairchild at a Tuesday debate tried to show the public that there are important differences in their core priorities and that they are the best person for the job.

Fairchild, the manager of chaplain services at Dayton Children’s Hospital, portrays himself as a strong voice and advocate for the city’s neighborhoods, which he says have been overlooked and desperately need a comprehensive revitalization plan.

Fairchild said unlike his opponent, he’ll be ready to lead from “day No. 1” because of his experience in community organizing, nonprofit work and what he says is a thorough understanding of the political process and main issues facing the city.

Ward, the senior pastor at Omega Baptist Church, depicted himself as a a servant of the community who has a special talent for working with people to get things done.

He said he is running for office because he cares deeply about the community and understands how collaboration can fix Dayton’s pressing problems. He said education is the largest problem outside of City Hall.

“I work hard at what I do,” he said. He later said, “I can bring hope, I can bring light and I’ve done that throughout my career in Dayton.”

Ward and Fairchild talked about their views and plans if elected during a wide-ranging debate at Stivers School for the Arts.

The event, which drew more than 150 visitors, was sponsored by the Dayton Daily News, WHIO-TV and Radio and the League of Women Voters of the Greater Dayton Area.

Ward said he will fight for the city and people of Dayton that he loves. He didn’t offer many specifics about what he might do on the commission.

But he said he has the determination and work ethic to make a difference.

Darryl Fairchild running for Dayton Commission

And he said he would work closely with commissioners to come up with ways to improve neighborhoods and would collaborate with the Dayton Public Schools to improve the quality of local education.

“We have to work together to bring hope — I really believe in this place,” he said.

He said he doesn’t have all the answers but will bring citizens together to figure out solutions to problems like hunger in the community and disinvestment in west Dayton.

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Fairchild said the current commission acts in lockstep and he would be the independent voice the commission needs to bring new ideas and spark healthy debate.

Many city neighborhoods are in rough shape because because the city does not have a clear vision and plan for their revitalization and reinvestment, said Fairchild.

Daryl Ward running for Dayton Commission

“People don’t want to invest in Dayton primarily because they don’t know where we’re going,” he said. “We have a great plan for downtown, but that’s only 7 percent of our whole city. What about the other 93 percent?”

Fairchild said he would be an accessible elected leader. He accused the city of putting up roadblocks when constituents come to air grievances.

Fairchild said too many people don’t feel safe in their neighborhoods and don’t believe their neighborhoods are a good place to raise a family.

“That is unacceptable to me,” he said. “When I’m elected, I’ll bring urgency to address these issues, and I’ll be a champion for our residents and neighborhoods.”

Other topics on Tuesday night included Good Samaritan Hospital’s closure and food access.

An audience member asked the candidates if they would be willing to stand up to Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, if needed.

Ward said he is willing to work with, and willing to stand up against, anyone if need be.

Fairchild said he is willing to speak truth to power and stand up for what’s right, even if it’s unpopular.

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New tax law may allow early filers to obtain extra money 

Published: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 @ 7:55 PM

New tax law may allow early filers to obtain extra money

If you filed your taxes before Feb. 9th of this year, there is a chance you may be able to obtain extra money thanks to the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. 

Enacted on the 9th, the new tax law extended the date for many benefits, including a mortgage insurance deduction. 

Both private mortgage insurance (PMI) and mortgage insurance premiums (MIP) are included in this deduction (but not homeowners or hazard insurance), which was recently added to the tax code by state governments. 

A tuition & fees deduction, home energy credit, energy-efficient vehicle credit, and energy-efficient vehicle charging station credit were also recently added to the tax code because of the Bipartisan act. 

Tax experts say those who filed taxes on their own may be unaware of these breaks, but can file an amended return within a three year time frame.  

Amended returns can only be filed by mail, and may take up to 16 weeks for processing. 

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