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Dayton special election set; Fairchild, Ward declare candidacies

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 12:11 PM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 4:15 PM


            Daryl Ward and Darryl Fairchild.
Daryl Ward and Darryl Fairchild.

The Dayton City Commission on Friday voted to hold a special election on May 8 to replace Commissioner Joey Williams, who has resigned after 16 years in office.

Two well-known faith leaders have already declared for the seat: Darryl Fairchild and Daryl Ward.

Though Williams was re-elected to a fifth term in November, he officially stepped down Friday, a decision he says was motivated by a more demanding travel schedule related to his new job.

The election is 74 days away, but Dayton residents who wish to replace Williams have just two weeks to collect 500 signatures of registered Dayton electors to appear on the ballot. The deadline is March 9.

RELATED: Dayton Commissioner Joey Williams to resign 4 months after re-election

That is a tall order considering that commission hopefuls usually have months to acquire the necessary signatures, said Fairchild, who has run for the seat twice before.

On Friday afternoon, Ward, the senior pastor of Omega Baptist Church, announced he is dropping out of the Montgomery County Commission race to instead run to try to replace Williams on the city commission.

Fairchild said the timing of Williams’ announcement seems deliberate to create a short window to discourage people from running. Dayton municipal special elections must take place 60 to 90 days after a vacancy on the commission.

Fairchild, the manager of chaplain services at Dayton Children’s Hospital, fell just 208 votes short of winning a spot on the commission in 2015, when he was edged out by political newcomer Chris Shaw.

RELATED: 5 things to know about Dayton Commissioner Joey Williams’ resignation

He and another challenger were defeated by a much larger margin in November 2071 by Williams and incumbent Commissioner Jeffrey Mims Jr.

Fairchild said since November’s election, Dayton has seen some of the negative consequences of failing to address the issues he says he prioritizes, including neighborhood development.

“We have Good Sam closing, we’ve got schools potentially closing, we’ve got Aldi’s closing and we have threats to our water well field,” he said.

Fairchild said he would push the city to develop a comprehensive plan for its neighborhoods, similar to the plans the city has for downtown and the Webster Station neighborhood.

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At a Friday press conference, more than 40 people joined Ward at the Montgomery County Board of Elections to show their support as he took out a nomination petition.

Ward was flanked by family members and friends and the crowd included all four members of the Dayton commission and Montgomery County Commissioner Dan Foley.

Rev. Ward said he is running for commission because of his love for the city and its citizens.

Ward said he was very sick several years ago, but though his body was shutting down, his vital organs were intact and strong.

“That’s like Dayton — we’ve got a lot of problems, but we have people, we have water, we have the strength of a wonderful history,” he said. “I would be so proud to be a part of helping that history become a bright future.”

Ward said his best traits are his maturity and wisdom and he’s an excellent listener who is detail-oriented.

Dayton’s last special election to fill a vacancy was in June 2001, when Edythe Lewis won a seat to complete the term of her husband, Lloyd E. Lewis Jr., who died about three months earlier.

Office-seekers had a short window to file a petition after the city had passed an ordinance calling for a special election: Just 10 days.

Edythe Lewis finished the last remaining months on her husband’s first term in office.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said it will be challenging for Dayton residents who want to serve on the commission to get the signatures they need in two weeks. But, she said, it’s been done before in even shorter time frames.

“It can be done, it just takes incredible organization, which is something you need to be a city commissioner anyway,” she said.

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Dayton standoff suspect wanted for violent crime

Published: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 7:23 PM
Updated: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 10:54 PM

Standoff

UPDATE @ 11:00 p.m.:

The suspect in tonight's standoff has been located and placed into custody, but no arrest has been made, said Lt. Matt Beavers.

He [the suspect] is wanted from a violent crime that occurred over the weekend; and after investigation, there are believed to be weapons in the house. 

On entering the house safely, Beavers said, “It’s safer for not only us and him, but also to the neighborhood, to do everything slow and methodically--instead of just sending a couple officers in and kicking a door and maybe being greeted by someone with a weapon.”

The hostage negotiations team will bring in the SWAT team and gather all information and meet with family members--and that’s how they discovered where the suspect was located.

“Taking our time creates a safety barrier so that no one gets hurt,” said Beavers.

According to neighbors, the suspect frequently goes into the vacant house located in the 200 block of Livingston Avenue, which was the second house of interest.

It is unknown if the suspect has mental health issues, and the case is still being investigated.

UPDATE @ 10:15 p.m.:

SWAT members are putting their gear away at the scene, and it appears the standoff is winding down. 

Apparently, the suspect they were seeking was not there and his mother reportedly told police that he is at a mental health facility in Mason, according to Montgomery County dispatch.

UPDATE @ 9:45 p.m.:

Police are communicating on the bullhorn again.

 

UPDATE @ 9:40 p.m.:

Police are entering one of the homes.

Police have lights directed on the house in the 100 block of Livingston Avenue, but they are no longer communicating with a bullhorn nor have their sirens on.

 

UPDATE @ 8:35 p.m.:

Police are surrounding a second house and have their guns drawn in the 200 block of Livingston Avenue.

People were seen coming in and out of the house, Montgomery County dispatch confirmed.

The original SWAT scene remains active at the house in the 100 block of Livingston Avenue.

UPDATE @ 7:40 p.m.:

Police are using a bullhorn to communicate with a suspect who is inside a home involved in a standoff with police. 

"You are under arrest. You need to come to the door with your hands up," an officer announced on the loudspeaker. 

Area residents are outside watching the police activity, with many recording the event on their smartphones.

FIRST REPORT:

The Dayton police SWAT team is on scene of an apparent standoff in the 100 block of Livingston Avenue.

Crews were dispatched at 4:22 p.m., Montgomery County Dispatch confirmed.

Livingston Avenue at Florence Avenue is currently closed.

We have a crew on scene and will update this page when more information becomes available. 

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

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Former Allen County sheriff indicted on several charges

Published: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 9:26 PM

A former Ohio Sheriff has been accused of taking bribes from drug dealers, and tipping them off to raids.

Former Allen County Sheriff Sam Crish faces a six-count indictment following a 21-month investigation by the Cleveland Office of the FBI.

Crish is accused of asking for and accepting bribes from drug dealers, along with allegedly tipping them off. Investigators say Crish would also make promises to people arrested in prostitution stings if they gave him money, and he would hit up suspected gamblers. 

He now faces 75 years in prison. 

“It is offensive as it is audacious, it’s brazen, it’s arrogant,” said U.S. Attorney Justin Herdman. “It absolutely does demean, everything that somebody who takes the oath of office to serve in law enforcement, it demeans everything about that. The actions alleged in the indictment are that of a crime boss, not a sheriff.”

Crish turned himself in to the FBI earlier today, but right now he’s out on bond. His attorney says he’s allowed to travel for his job, and to Florida next month to attend gambling addiction treatment. Crish admitted to a gambling problem shortly after his office was raided in 2016.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

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Gas prices to drop around 10 cents this week

Published: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 8:16 PM

The average price of gas in Ohio drops 10 cents this week.

Ohio has topped the charts for the biggest weekly change in gas price averages in the country; Ohio is the 11th lowest in the nation at $2.70 per gallon.

Nationwide, 44 states have less expensive or steady gas price averages compared to last Monday. However, the cheaper trend may be reversing. “If demand continues to strengthen and inventories decrease in the weeks ahead, motorists can expect gas prices do a reversal and start to increase again,” said AAA spokeswoman Jennifer Moore. “AAA expects the national gas price average to range between $2.85 and $3.05 through Labor Day, likely seeing the summer’s highest prices in June.”

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: How fast heat can harm your child or pet

Moving into this week, another factor that will influence gas prices in the near and long-term will be outcomes from the June 22 OPEC meeting in Vienna, Austria. The cartel, along with other major producers including Russia, will discuss increasing oil production ahead of the year-end scheduled dissolution of its production reduction agreement.

Motorists are spending $69 or more a month for gas compared to last year, but that won’t stop their summer travel. Gas expenses are accounting, on average, for 7% of an American’s 2018 annual income.

Visit https://gasprices.aaa.com/ to check the latest gas prices.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

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Supreme Court to hear arguments over Trump travel ban

Published: Monday, June 26, 2017 @ 10:33 AM
Updated: Monday, June 26, 2017 @ 10:33 AM

File photo: Supreme Court of the United States
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
File photo: Supreme Court of the United States(J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

The Supreme Court on Monday announced that it would listen to arguments surrounding President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban during its October sitting.

>> Read more trending news

The decision came down as justices announced their final opinions of the term ahead of a summer break. Justices will review arguments over whether the ban violates constitutional protections against religion-based discrimination, among other things.

The court also agreed to lift preliminary injunctions that blocked the government from barring foreign nationals without connections to the U.S. from entering the country.

Justices said in their filing Monday that upholding the injunctions “would appreciably injure (America’s) interests without alleviating obvious hardship to anyone else.”

The court left in place injunctions that affect “foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."

Trump hailed the high court’s order as a “clear victory for our national security.” He said in a statement that his “number one responsibility” is to keep the American people safe.

>> Read the Supreme Court order

The Trump administration appealed to the Supreme Court on June 1 after a lower court blocked the travel ban from going into effect.

The administration argued that an injunction issued by the Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in May was too broad in blocking the government from banning foreign travelers from six Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. for 90 days.

The travel ban was the second executive order addressing travel to the United States signed by the president after key provisions of the first were blocked by a federal court.

Trump signed his original executive order in January, barring foreign nationals from seven countries Muslim-majority from entering the U.S. for 90 days and suspending the U.S. refugee program for 120 days.

A federal judge blocked several key provision of the ban a week later. An appeals court declined to lift the order and the government announced it would put together a new travel ban.

The second version of the executive order was signed March 6 and barred foreign nationals from six Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S.: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Major parts of the second executive order were blocked by a federal court in May, which determined that the government was likely to lose its case, because its arguments appeared to target people based on their religion rather than on national security concerns.

The president has numerous times argued that his travel ban is necessary to ensure the safety of Americans.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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