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Airfield Operations Flight at Wright-Patt keeps things safely moving

Published: Friday, November 10, 2017 @ 9:31 AM


            Senior Airman Nicholas Jacobs, 88th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller journeyman, uses binoculars to observe Wright-Patterson’s flightline while Airman Morgan Everton, 88 OSS air traffic controller apprentice, assists Jacobs in flight data and ground control duties. Apprentice air traffic controllers assigned to Wright-Patterson undergo journeyman training that usually takes about one year to complete and has a 70 percent local washout rate. (U.S. Air Force photo/John Harrington)
Senior Airman Nicholas Jacobs, 88th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller journeyman, uses binoculars to observe Wright-Patterson’s flightline while Airman Morgan Everton, 88 OSS air traffic controller apprentice, assists Jacobs in flight data and ground control duties. Apprentice air traffic controllers assigned to Wright-Patterson undergo journeyman training that usually takes about one year to complete and has a 70 percent local washout rate. (U.S. Air Force photo/John Harrington)

It’s nearly impossible for anyone who lives or works around Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to not notice the frequent low roar of C-17 Globemaster IIIs coming and going on a nearly daily basis.

Wright-Patterson has nine C-17s assigned from the 445th Airlift Wing and while the base doesn’t have the flight line activity seen at locations like Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, or Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, with their assigned fighter squadrons, it doesn’t mean controlling air traffic at Wright-Patt is easy for the 88th Operations Support Squadron Airfield Operations Flight.

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“Compared to other bases, it’s not super busy, but what we do get is very complex,” said Capt. Chelsea Silsby, 88 OSS Airfield Operations Flight commander.

Complex like during recent hurricane evacuation operations when more than 65 Air Force and Navy aircraft from South Carolina and Florida found safe haven at Wright-Patt during Hurricane Irma.

Some aircraft were small fighters, like F-15 Eagles from Jackonsville, while others were bigger patrol aircraft, like the P-3 Orions and P-8 Poseidons from a Navy base in Jacksonville, with C-17s from Charleston Air Force Base finishing the mix.

How fast a plane flies, how long it takes it to go through the standard aerial path to the runway – known as the “pattern,” and how long it takes a plane to get off the runway after it’s landed all play into how complicated an air traffic controller’s job will be.

“If you have some really fast airplanes and then some slow, big ones in the same pattern, it’s a lot harder to keep them spaced apart, so that takes a lot of training for our [controllers] upstairs,” said Silsby. “Fortunately, we have a really good simulator. I would say we have the best in the Air Force, honestly. Jack Wilson is our Air Traffic Control Tower Simulator administrator, and the Air Force pulls him as a subject matter expert all the time, nationwide, to look at other people’s sims and programs, just to make sure they’re right because ours is so good.”

Wilson, a retired senior master sergeant with 21 years of active-duty air traffic controller experience, sees his mission a little simpler.

“I guarantee I create stress,” Wilson said. “I use the air traffic control simulator to create the situation to force the decision making for the air traffic controller to learn. I want to prepare them as if I was the watch supervisor [in the tower].”

In the case of the recent hurricane evacuation, Wilson had already put his controllers through a HUREVAC scenario at the start of hurricane season as he does every year. Silsby said that because the controllers had already been put through the paces of controlling high numbers of different kinds of aircraft landing at Wright-Patt in quick succession on the simulator, it made the actual HUREVAC more of an exciting event for her controllers instead of a stressful one.

“Mr. Wilson has dedicated a lot of time and effort, above and beyond what is even expected of him, to develop scenarios,” said 88 OSS Chief Controller Master Sgt. Bethany Norton. “He could essentially just create a sim and let people run with it. But, he creates different sims for each trainee every time they go down to see him on a daily basis.”

Wilson trains air traffic controllers from apprentice level through journeyman at Wright-Patt as one of nearly 90 Air Force bases that train apprentice controllers straight from their initial technical training. The training takes about a year and isn’t easy – about 70 percent wash out from the program, according to Wilson.

“With the lack of traffic that we have here on a day-to-day basis, we couldn’t have competent controllers without him,” said Senior Airman Tyler Jacobs, 88 OSS air traffic controller journeyman. “Because to get rated in position, you’re supposed to have up to four aircraft at the same time in the air and the amount of times we actually see that here with live traffic is very few and far between. So, to be able to train on that every day [on the simulator] is crucial.”

It’s not only airplanes depicted on the simulator either. The Airfield Operations Flight is divided into two parts: air traffic control and airfield management. Together, they are responsible for controlling all air traffic around a 5-mile radius of the base as well as everything on the flight line, including all vehicle traffic, maintenance, construction and personnel.

“In air traffic, they have to know how to do air traffic control for every type of aircraft in the inventory,” Silsby said. “Then for airfield management, they have to know the rules for parking and wingtip clearance for every aircraft in the inventory. They know the rules on what the airfield needs to look like at the end of the day and so they work with all these different teams across the base to make sure that that happens.”

That could mean working with base civil engineers to get construction completed on the airfield while minimizing its impact on flight operations or ensuring that pilots and air crews get the logistical support they need after landing, according to Silsby. During the HUREVAC, it additionally meant figuring out where to put all the planes, a feat Silsby gave great credit to Airfield Manager Rome Alcantara for accomplishing with his team.

“It looks like we have a lot of pavement but it’s still like a big [puzzle] to try to get everything to fit in an appropriate and safe place,” Silsby said.

Wilson says that while Wright-Patterson may be rated the 84th busiest control tower in the Air Force, the mission is just as important here as it is anywhere.

“I know I have to equip them with the tools to be successful,” Wilson said. “Because if I’m the manager down range, I don’t want a weak link. I want somebody that’s exposed to the rules and practiced the rules. I want them to be confident because deployments are stressful as it is. I want them to find a comfort level and find it fast, and really contribute at the tip of the spear for the mission on the other side of the world.”

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Tons of trash, overpowering stench at Moraine site of raid

Published: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 6:55 PM
Updated: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 11:50 PM

Deputies are moving years of waste

Tons of trash dumped in a wooded area off Germantown Pike, which has caused an overpowering stench, is part of a Monday law enforcement raid at the property that led to one arrest.

  • Raid at home, garage in 6700 block of Germantown Pike
  • Tons of trash found dumped in wooded area behind home
  • Man jailed, awaiting formal drug possession charge

>> Harrison Twp. man accused of seriously injuring his newborn son

(MIKE BURIANEK / STAFF)

A large law enforcement presence was at a Germantown Pike property all day.

Montgomery County Sheriff’s deputies, a special weapons and tactics team and Regional Agencies Narcotics and Gun Enforcement task force members were on scene at a home in the 6700 block of Germantown Pike and deep into the woods of the property.

Deputies brought a semi and dumpster back into the woods. They were seen moving some of the trash around. They hauled away a backhoe as evidence.

Neighbors said deputies carried piles of items from that wooded area, as well as from a house and garage.

>> Many officers may testify against Dayton suspect shot by Miami Twp. police at busy interchange

“They found stuff back there. They’ve carried out huge tubs, looked like it was really heavy. Big boxes of things. They carried out stuff in cloths, white cloths.”

Neighbors said the RANGE task force was ready to break down the home’s front door when one of them offered a key. They said they watched deputies carry out several guns, and then the task force did break a door to get into the garage.

One man was spotted handcuffed in back of a cruiser.

Logan R. Lucas(MONTGOMERY COUNTY JAIL)

Logan R. Lucas, 23, was arrested at 2 p.m. during the raid in the 6700 block of Germantown Pike and booked into the Montgomery County Jail on suspicion of drug possession, online jail records show. He has not been formally charged.

Deputies removed items from the home and deep in the woods behind the property, but so far have not said what led to the investigation.

>> Man arrested following false shooting call in Centerville

Crews also removed two dogs along with their food and water bowls from the home, Jacobs said.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

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Power restored in Montgomery County

Published: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 11:25 PM
Updated: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 2:50 AM

UPDATE @2:50 a.m. (June 19): Power has been restored in Montgomery County, according to DP&L.

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

UPDATE @ 1:30 a.m. (June 19):

Outages in Montgomery County number nearly 1,300, according to the Dayton Power & Light’s online outage map.

At 11 p.m., there were more than 4,100 power outages reported.

UPDATE @ 12:45 a.m. (June 19):

There are 1,586 Dayton Power & Light customers without power, down from more than 4,100 without service in Montgomery County reported at 11 p.m. Monday.

UPDATE @ 12:10 a.m. (June 19):

Power has been restored to half of the original 4,100 customers reported out of service at 11 p.m.

There are now 2,138 without power as Dayton Power & Light crews work to restore service.

The cause of the outage is unknown.

UPDATE @ 11:55 p.m.:

About 500 people have power restored so far when Dayton Power & Light’s online outage map reported 4,100 customers in the dark.

There are now just more than 3,600 without power.

FIRST REPORT

More than 4,100 Dayton Power & Light customers are in the dark in Montgomery County.

Crews were sent to investigate why service was interrupted and to restore power, according to a utility spokeswoman.

The power outage was reported at 11:07 p.m.

According to the online outage map, service is expected to be restored by 1 a.m.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

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Dayton traffic from the WHIO Traffic Center

Published: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 12:53 AM
Updated: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 2:06 AM

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic.

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • No major incidents to report

Surface Street Incidents

  • No major incidents to report

>> RELATED: WHIO Weather App

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

  • Valley Street between Stanley Avenue and Brandt Street will be closed for reconstruction through late October. This is the first phase of a project to reconstruct Valley Street from Stanley Avenue to Rita Street.
  • Arlington Road between Pleasant Plain and Upper Lewisburg Salem Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE, March 5 - Sept. 30. All ramps for I-70 will remain open. 
  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west, RAMP CLOSURE, March 12 - Sept. 30. The official detour is: I-75 north to US 35 east to Jefferson/Main Street to Ludlow Street to US 35 west
  • I-75 between Northwoods Boulevard and the Miami County Line, Nightlylane closures June 4 - July 9 between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. Two lanes will remain open in each direction. 
  • I-75 between SR 48 and Needmore Road, Nightly lane closures April 29 - July 31 between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. Will become double lane closures at 10 p.m. 
  • SR 48 between First Street and Riverdale Street, Lane closure April 2, 2018 - April 1, 2019. One lane will remain open in each direction.

GREENE COUNTY

  • State Route 235 between Dayton Yellow Springs and Enon Roads, ROAD CLOSURE for six months. The official detour is U.S. 68, West Hyde, and West Enon Roads.
  • Trebein Road from U.S. 35, Lane restrictions April 16 - August, 2018 for construction of a right turn lane. One lane will remain maintained at all times with flagging operations. 

WARREN COUNTY

MIAMI COUNTY

  • N. Market Street between Foss Way/Kirk Lane and Stonyridge Avenue, ROAD CLOSURE March 5 at 7 a.m. - Aug. 10 at 5 p.m. 
  • US 36 westbound between Scott Drive and Kienle Drive, Lane closure March 26 - June 30. One westbound lane will remain open. 
  • US 36 between Scott Drive and Aerovent Drive, Lane closure April 26 - August 31. 

DARKE COUNTY

  • Arcanum Bears-Mill Road between Folkerth Road and Erisman Road, ROAD CLOSURE June 4 - August 3. The official detour is: SR 49 to US 36/US 127 to US 36
  • SR 49 between Rossburg Lighsville Road and SR 47, Daily lane closures May 28 - July 2 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • SR 722 between Gordon-Landis Road and SR 49, Dailylane closures May 28 - July 2 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Sweitzer Street/ West Fourth Street between Pine Street and Sycamore Street, ROAD CLOSURE May 21 - May 31, 2019. The official detour is: Pine Street to Washington Avenue to Broadway.
  • US 36/US 127 between Hogpath Road and Horatio- Harris Creek Road, Daily lane closures April 30 - August 31 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.

MERCER COUNTY

  • SR 49 between Park Road and Zehringer Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE June 18 - 25. The official detour is: SR 119 to SR 118 to SR 219.
  • SR 117 between US 127 and SR 116, Daily lane closures April 23 - July 31 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. 

SHELBY COUNTY

  • SR 29 between SR 274 and Pleiman Road, Daily lane closures May 18 - June 30 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • SR 66 between SR 47 and Russia Houston Road, Daily lane closures May 18 - June 30 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. 
  • SR 66 between SR 48 and Schlater Road, Daily lane closures May 14 - June 22 between 7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
  • SR 47 between Fifth Avenue and Wilkinson Avenue, Lane closures Jan. 21 - Nov. 27. One lane will remain open in each direction at all times.  

CLARK COUNTY

  • I-70 east Ramp to I-675 north, RAMP CLOSURE March 15 - Aug. 15. The official detour is: I-70 east to I-675 south to SR 444 to I-675 north
  • Spangler Road south between Restoration Drive and I-70, Traffic pattern switch March 26 - August 15. Southbound Spangler Road traffic going to I-675 south and I-70 east will be moved to northbound side of I-675. Traffic will then be redirected to the southbound side of I-675 after passing over I-70. 
  • US 42 between Bershet Street and Short Street, ROAD CLOSURE July 9 - 13. The official detour is: SR 72 to I-70 to SR 41.

CHAMPAIGN COUNTY

  • US 36 between Zimmerman Road and Kite Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE June 11 - August 10. The official detour is: SR 235 to SR 29 to SR 560.

LOGAN COUNTY

  • SR 347 between Rogers Road and C - 154, ROAD CLOSURE June 29 - July 7. The official detour is: SR 347 to US 33 to SR 739 to SR 347.
  • SR 47 between County Road 12 and SR 292, BRIDGE CLOSURE June 4 - 25. The official detour is: County Road 5 to SR 540 to SR 292 to SR 47.
  • SR 274 between Morris Rose Road and SR 235, Daily lane closures May 1 - June 29 between 7 a.m. 5 p.m. 
  • SR 235 between SR 720 and SR 117, Daily lane closures May 1 - June 29 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • SR 68 between SR 508 and Gunn Town Road, Daily lane closures April 23 - June 29 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. 

AUGLAIZE COUNTY

  • US 33 between SR 29 and I-75, Daily lane closures March 26 - July 31 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. One lane will remain open in each direction. 

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Man pleads guilty to tampering with a coin machine, stealing quarters in New Carlisle

Published: Monday, June 18, 2018 @ 1:16 PM
Updated: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 1:57 AM


            Jeffrey Hale
Jeffrey Hale

A man pleaded guilty in Clark County court to stealing quarters from a coin machine in New Carlisle, according to online court records.

Jeffrey Hale, 36, of Huber Heights, was charged in Clark County Municipal Court with tampering with a coin machine. He pleaded guilty to the charge and his sentence was not immediately clear.

MORE: 5 Springfield businesses report burglaries in last two days

Clark County deputies began their investigation when they responded to a laundromat in New Carlisle in reference to a theft.

“Upon arrival, the business owner advised he was reviewing his security camera from the weekend and observed a male using a metal wire to remove quarters from the coin machine inside the business,” the report says.

The deputy said he could not identify the man at the time, but did recognize a person with him.

MORE: Springfield killer had connections to slain woman, family says

A few days later deputies say they received a tip from an anonymous source who said the man was Hale.

“I located a social for Jeff and pulled up his BMV picture and was able to positively identify the suspect s Jeff Hale,” the affidavit says.

Hale was later arrested.

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