These Dayton kids made a real ruckus in the Oregon District and left people cheering

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 2:32 PM

Stivers School for the Arts students took part in a New Orleans-style second line to raise awareness of DVAC’s 24th Annual Art Auction.
Photo: Amelia Robinson
Stivers School for the Arts students took part in a New Orleans-style second line to raise awareness of DVAC’s 24th Annual Art Auction.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Oregon District diners simply were not ready. 

A dozen or so rambunctious Dayton kids roamed up and down the district 

and in and out of its restaurants, bars and shops Thursday evening.

>> 10 reasons we love Fifth Street and the Oregon District, and why you should, too

The Stivers School for the Arts students swayed and stepped to the theme from the HBO show “Treme” that two classmates played on a trombone and a trumpet.   

The New Orleans-style second line of student artists was led by Eva Buttacavoli, the executive director of the Dayton Visual Arts Center.

>> Diverse cast of Dayton kids taking on Cinderella and her glass slipper this weekend

>> The region’s premiere arts event showcases the best Dayton has to offer

They carried some of the artwork included in DVAC’s 24th Annual Art Auction, which will take place at 6 p.m. Friday, April 27 at Sinclair Community College’s Ponitz Center, 

444 W Third St., downtown Dayton. 

Tickets for the event are $50 for DVAC members, $60 for nonmembers and $75 at the door. 

INFO & TICKETS: daytonvisualarts.org | 937-224-3822

We were with the students as they made a ruckus in the name of art in a handful of Fifth Street businesses that included  Bonnett’s Book Store; Blind Bob’s; Lucky’s Taproom, Goodwill, Lily’s Bistro and Corner Kitchen.

Buttacavoli gave away free tickets to surprised diners and shoppers along the way. 

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Meet Miles Theodore: Chrissy Teigen and John Legend introduce son in adorable first photo

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 12:56 AM

What You Need To Know About John Legend

    

The newest Legend has a name — and to no surprise, he’s a complete cutie.

    

After much debate over when Chrissy Teigen and John Legend would share their newborn baby boy‘s moniker and first photo, Teigen did both with an Instagram photo on Sunday.

    

“Hello, world! This is Miles Theodore Stephens – We are drowning in his little peeps and nuzzles,” wrote the proud mom. “Our household feels overwhelmed with love. Thank you for all your well wishes!”

    

Late Wednesday evening, the couple revealed their second child had arrived, with the 32-year-old model writing, “Somebody’s herrrrrrre!” on Twitter alongside baby bottle and high-five smiley emojis. He joins newly minted big sister Luna Simone, 2.

     

The Lip Sync Battle host previously hinted that childbirth was a little easier this time around.

    

“I can confirm postpartum life is 90% better when you don’t rip to your butthole,” she wrote on Twitter Saturday night, adding, “Baby boy: 1 point. Luna: 0.”

    

The new mother of two also responded to a fan on Twitter Friday who asked whether the couple’s son resembled Luna, and revealed he’d made his appearance a little sooner than the family expected.

    

“Same nose!” wrote Teigen of the siblings. “He is a few weeks early so he’s litttttttle and makes the teeniest noises. We are in love.”

RELATED: Of Course Chrissy Teigen’s Birth Announcement Turned Into a Twitter Feud About Pizza   

 

Three days after daughter Luna’s April 14, 2016, arrival, Teigen wrote alongside a snapshot of the baby’s weight (6 lbs., 11 oz.), “She’s here! Luna Simone Stephens, we are so in love with you! And sleepy. Very sleepy.”

    

Legend, 39, also tweeted the happy news at that time, writing, “Our new love is here! Luna Simone Stephens, born on Thursday, the 14th. We couldn’t be happier!”

The couple also shared baby Luna’s first photos to social media just two days later, with the model and cookbook author captioning a mother-daughter snap, “Hi my lulu!” 

Teigen’s mother Vilailuck Teigen posted her own photograph of herself and her new granddaughter that same day, while Legend shared a sweet close-up of his adorable baby girl’s face the following day.

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Aimovig: New migraine prevention drug approved by FDA

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 6:23 AM

Migraines Could Be Triggered By Gut Bacteria

If you suffer from chronic migraines, relief is here.

According to The Associated Press, the Food and Drug Administration last week approved Aimovig, a monthly shot that aims to reduce migraines. The drug, developed by Amgen Inc. and Novartis AG, is "injected monthly just under the skin using a pen-like device," the AP reported. Its price tag: $6,900 annually before insurance.

>> On ActionNewsJax.com: New drug could reduce migraines

But how does Aimovig work? The FDA said it blocks "the activity of calcitonin gene-related peptide, a molecule that is involved in migraine attacks." Amgen researchers said participants in one study saw their migraines reduced by half and experienced "minor side effects" like colds, the AP reported.

>> Read more trending news 

If Aimovig doesn't sound right for you, you're still in luck: Three similar shots and various pills to combat migraines are in the works.

Read more here.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Fan literally gets a “Sparkle” for 100th birthday 

Published: Friday, May 18, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

In celebration of Clayton resident Harold Prigozen’s 100th birthday May 14, dancer Sheri “Sparkle” Williams gave him a concert poster signed by DCDC dancers.
In celebration of Clayton resident Harold Prigozen’s 100th birthday May 14, dancer Sheri “Sparkle” Williams gave him a concert poster signed by DCDC dancers.

It is not every day that a 50-year-old dance company’s biggest fan turns 100. 

The Dayton Contemporary Dance Company didn’t let the moment pass by. 

In celebration of Clayton resident Harold Prigozen’s 100th birthday May 14, dancer Sheri “Sparkle” Williams gave him a concert poster signed by DCDC dancers.

>> RELATED: DCDC celebrates 50 years (Feb. 20, 2018) 

He’s a big, big fan,” Jay L. Peterson, DCDC’s director of marketing and special events, told this news organization. “We thought we’d take our number one dancer to meet with our  number one fan.  

Williams, an Ohio Arts Council’s Individual Artist Award winner in 2014, has danced with DCDC 44 years. 

>> RELATED: Photos of Sheri “Sparkle” Williams

Prigozen has not only made his mark on Dayton’s arts community. He’s also inspired its food. 

Harold’s Grilled Cheese at Jimmie’s Ladder 11 in Dayton is named for Prigozen. 

It comes between Texas toast topped with pepper jack, Swiss, cheddar, provolone and American cheese for $7. Diners have the choice of tomato, pickle and onions. Bacon is $1 more. 

The restaurant’s Dr. Saidel's Salad is named for his good friend Burt Saidel.

>> Your 2018 Dayton Bucket List: 50 ideas for fun

 Most of  DCDC’s dancers are currently performing in Europe.

 

>> What’s the frequency, Kenneth? Local brewery brews special beer for Hamvention 

As part of its 50th anniversary celebration, DCDC will present a free summer concert called Street Beats 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 9 at Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton.

It will feature performance by DCDC, its training company DCDC2 and a list of guest artists that includes the  Miami Valley Dance Company and Xclusive Dance Crew.

A work choreographed by DCDC Artistic Director Debbie Blunden-Diggs to Stevie Wonder’s “Shining Star” will be performed as well as a work titled “No Exit” by MVDC co-director Lily Seitter.

>> Kettering business asked to leave shopping center after 25 years

Dayton Contemporary Dance Company will present its free concert Street Beats 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 9, 2018 at Courthouse Square.(Submitted)

 

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New autism research could predict whether children as young as 3 months old are at risk

Published: Thursday, May 17, 2018 @ 6:05 AM

New Autism Research Could Determine Which Children Are At Risk

A groundbreaking study is being done at Boston Children's Hospital that researchers say could potentially predict whether a child as young as 3 months old is at-risk for developing autism.

>> Watch the news report here

Right now, most children can't receive a reliable diagnosis until they are at least 1 year old. 

Chase Minicucci and his mother, Hillary Steele Minicucci, regularly go to Boston Children’s to track his development. Chase seems to be a typically developing toddler, and he’s learning to point and use words to express his needs.

>> Could blood and urine test be used to diagnose autism?

However, Chase has been identified as at risk because his older brother, who is 7, has autism.

“We did the testing, and one day after his 4th birthday … the doctor said, ‘so your son has autism,’” said Hillary Steele Minicucci. 

Hillary and her husband also have a 6-year-old daughter who does not have autism, but autism is more prevalent in boys. 

Research shows one in five children whose siblings have autism will also be on the spectrum. Hillary spent the first year of Chase's life watching his behavior closely and worrying.

“I was literally making myself crazy over it,” she said. 

Hillary was able to find a spot for Chase in a study at Boston Children's Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, involving 99 siblings of children with autism.

Infants as young as 3 months old and toddlers up to 36 months old spend only a few minutes wearing a cap with more than 100 sensors. While wearing it, they watch a T.V. showing cartoons, which is also an eye tracker.

Boston Children's Cognitive Neuroscience Lab Director Dr. Charles Nelson said by studying their EEG signals, the electrical activity in the brain, they can predict which infants are likely to develop autism.

“What we've seen is at 3 months of age, we've seen patterns of brain activity that basically predict who, three years later, will develop autism,” said Nelson. 

>> Read more trending news 

One of the big unknowns is when does autism develop, and Nelson said the study is shining light on whether it happens before or after birth. 

“It's very unlikely that brain development was perfectly normal until birth and then something happened. The fact that we see it so early, just at 3 months, makes me think that it started before birth. But what derailed brain development, we don't know,” he said. 

Dr. Nelson stressed the medical community is not at the point yet where a 3-month-old could receive a diagnosis, but the child could be flagged. The next step is developing early intervention strategies for that age group.

As for Chase, his mother said that right now, he doesn't seem to be exhibiting some of the warning signs, which has given her some much-needed reassurance.

“I can start to enjoy my baby now,” she said. 

The study is ongoing and open to three groups of children: 

  • Babies with older siblings with ASD
  • Babies with no family history of autism who failed an autism screening
  • Typically developing babies
Because the EEG caps are relatively inexpensive, Nelson hopes someday soon every local pediatrician's office could have one and all infants could be identified within a critical window of time.

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