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3 times Fiona the baby hippo stole our hearts

Published: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 @ 10:38 AM

Fiona goes for a swim

Fiona, the first Nile hippo born at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical garden in 75 years, was born Jan. 24 and weighed just 29 pounds. The normal birth weight for the species is 55-120 pounds. 

Four months after she was prematurely born, the media will be able to watch Fiona in her outside habitat and pool later today.

» RELATED: Baby hippo Fiona to make media appearance today 

Here are some of Fiona’s cutest moments:

Fiona’s first steps

In early February, Fiona was able to take her first steps, which her handlers called “encouraging” news because the calf had been exhibiting low energy and weak suckling response.

A premature hippo born 6 weeks early took it's first walk at the Cincinnati Zoo over the weekend.

Teething

A few weeks later, Fiona, in addition to bottle feeding and upgrading to a “big kid” pool, began teething. The animal care team provided gum pain relief with topical numbing solution in frozen clothes to help with the discomfort. 

» PHOTOS: Fiona the baby hippo is teething

Catches a glimpse of her parents

On March 28, Fiona was able to take a peek at her parents in their outdoor habitat. 

Fiona takes a peek at her parents in their outdoor habitat. (PHOTO: Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden)(Staff Writer)

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Ohio among states battling sudden rise in Hepatitis A cases

Published: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 @ 12:10 PM

Thirty one cases have been reported in Ohio.

The number of Hepatitis A cases in Ohio and neighboring states has spiked since January, the Ohio Department of Health is reporting.

The are currently 31 cases in the state, the highest since 2015, the Greene County Public Health said in a release Tuesday. In comparison, there were four cases during the same period in 2017, two in 2016 and five in 2015, according to the release. 

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable, communicable disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus, the agency said in the release. It is usually transmitted by person-to-person through contact with an infected person’s stool, or consumption of contaminated food or water, the release said. 

“One thing you want to do is make sure your food is thoroughly cooked,” said Dan Suffoletto, public information supervisor at Public Health–Dayton & Montgomery County.

Credit card skimmers found during weekend sweep in Montgomery County

A confirmed case of hepatitis A includes both a positive laboratory test and symptom onset, with either jaundice or elevated liver function tests.

Outbreaks have been linked to contact with known hepatitis A case; homelessness; IV drug use; and men who have sex with men, the release said. 

Ohio is the latest state to be affected by the Hepatitis A outbreak. Neighboring states such as Indiana, Kentucky and  Michigan have all been affected. 

Ohio included in ice pop recall list for possible listeria 

Health officials say people can be vaccinated to protect themselves from hepatitis A, but the two doses have to be taken over a six month period. 

According to Greene County Public Health, hepatitis A contact can occur by: 

• eating food made by an infected person who did not wash his or her hands after using the bathroom

• drinking untreated water or eating food washed in untreated water

• placing a finger or an object in your mouth that came into contact with an infected person’s stool

• having close personal contact with an infected person, such as through sex or caring for someone who is ill 

CDC working to find source of E. coli outbreak that’s reached 7 states

One cannot get hepatitis A from:

• being coughed on or sneezed on by an infected person

• sitting next to an infected person

• hugging an infected person 

A baby cannot get hepatitis A from breast milk.

Who is at increased risk for acquiring hepatitis A virus infection?

•Persons with direct contact with persons who have hepatitis A

•Travelers to countries with high or intermediate rates of hepatitis A

•Men who have sex with men

•Users of injection and non-injection drugs

•Persons with clotting factor disorders

•Household members and other close contacts of adopted children newly arriving from countries with high or intermediate hepatitis rates.

What are the symptoms of hepatitis A:

Some people have symptoms two to six weeks after they come in contact with the virus.

People with hepatitis A typically get better without treatment after a few weeks. In some cases, symptoms can last up to six months. 

These symptoms may include:

•dark yellow urine

•feeling tired

•fever

•gray- or clay-colored stools

•joint pain

•loss of appetite

•nausea

•pain in the abdomen 

•vomiting

•yellowish eyes and skin, called jaundice

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Stray dog named Publix rescued, then adopted by his guardian angel

Published: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 11:45 AM
Updated: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 @ 10:15 AM

Publix the dog
PAWS Atlanta
Publix the dog(PAWS Atlanta)

A stray dog who lingered around a former Publix grocery store in metro Atlanta for a year has finally found a loving home. The story behind the adoption is heartwarming.

The animal shelter PAWS Atlanta posted Publix's story Friday on its Facebook page. Shelter staff said a woman came rushing to the office Thursday as it was closing, asking if they had Publix.

>> Read more trending news 

Publix was a dog that shelter staff and concerned residents had been trying to rescue for a year. In December, shelter staff were able to rescue the dog and house him at the shelter. The woman who visited the facility Thursday evening knew the dog well; she called him Buddy. She said the dog would visit her shop and she would feed him, and the two had developed a close bond. When the dog disappeared in December, she had feared the worst.


The woman was overjoyed to learn that the rescue organization had Publix, after a friend alerted her when she saw the photo of the dog on the shelter's Instagram feed.

Shelter staff said Publix was thrilled to see the woman who had been so kind to him, and that they'd never seen Publix so happy or animated.

The woman decided to adopt Publix, making for the happiest of endings for all involved. In an update posted on Instagram Monday, the happy new owner said that Publix is her “little shadow,” and goes to work with her each day.

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Trees cleared at Centerville site before bat population returns

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 3:51 PM


            Hallmark Campus Communities, the developer of the Gateway Lofts, a 360-unit multi-family development along East Alex-Bell Road near Chardonnay Drive, has completed an extensive tree-clearing project designed to help with completing the development. The project had to be finished prior to bats relocating to the area for the season. TY GREENLEES/STAFF
            TY GREENLEES/STAFF
Hallmark Campus Communities, the developer of the Gateway Lofts, a 360-unit multi-family development along East Alex-Bell Road near Chardonnay Drive, has completed an extensive tree-clearing project designed to help with completing the development. The project had to be finished prior to bats relocating to the area for the season. TY GREENLEES/STAFF(TY GREENLEES/STAFF)

A company building a 360-unit housing development in Centerville has cleared about 20 acres of trees for the project, work it needed to finish this month because of rules regarding a bat.

Hallmark Campus Communities is developer of the Gateway Lofts – a multi-family development along East Alex-Bell Road near Chardonnay Drive.

MORE: Centerville seeing apartment boom near Cross Pointe

It cleared approximately 20 acres of forest between East Alex Bell Road and I-675, with about 15 acres of woodlands included in that, according to Maureen Hodgson, community resources coordinator for the city of Centerville.

Hallmark officials said the tree clearing on the planned apartment complex needed to be completed by early April due to requirements by the Army Corps of Engineers to mitigate the impact on the Indiana bat and Northern long-eared bat populations that are present in the development area. The bats traditionally settle into the area after April for mating, so trees could not be cut down after then.

MORE: New apartments are coming to Centerville and Sugarcreek Twp., and here’s how they look

According to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Northern long-eared bat and Indiana bat are federally listed as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

A spokesman for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service said the bats made the endangered species list due to white-nose syndrome, which is a fatal fungus that wakes up bats during winter, when there are no insects to consume.

Will Kirk, who is the project manager for the development, said the plan for Gateway includes 14 walk-up apartment buildings that will include 256 one-bedroom units and 104 two-bedroom units.

Apartment buildings will be either two or three-stories, depending on their location in the development. A clubhouse with a swimming pool is to be located near the Alex-Bell entrance. A secondary entrance to Gateway will be from Loop Road at Versailles Drive.

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These Dayton kids made a real ruckus in the Oregon District and left people cheering

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 2:32 PM

Stivers School for the Arts students took part in a New Orleans-style second line to raise awareness of DVAC’s 24th Annual Art Auction.
Photo: Amelia Robinson
Stivers School for the Arts students took part in a New Orleans-style second line to raise awareness of DVAC’s 24th Annual Art Auction.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Oregon District diners simply were not ready. 

A dozen or so rambunctious Dayton kids roamed up and down the district 

and in and out of its restaurants, bars and shops Thursday evening.

>> 10 reasons we love Fifth Street and the Oregon District, and why you should, too

The Stivers School for the Arts students swayed and stepped to the theme from the HBO show “Treme” that two classmates played on a trombone and a trumpet.   

The New Orleans-style second line of student artists was led by Eva Buttacavoli, the executive director of the Dayton Visual Arts Center.

>> Diverse cast of Dayton kids taking on Cinderella and her glass slipper this weekend

>> The region’s premiere arts event showcases the best Dayton has to offer

They carried some of the artwork included in DVAC’s 24th Annual Art Auction, which will take place at 6 p.m. Friday, April 27 at Sinclair Community College’s Ponitz Center, 

444 W Third St., downtown Dayton. 

Tickets for the event are $50 for DVAC members, $60 for nonmembers and $75 at the door. 

INFO & TICKETS: daytonvisualarts.org | 937-224-3822

We were with the students as they made a ruckus in the name of art in a handful of Fifth Street businesses that included  Bonnett’s Book Store; Blind Bob’s; Lucky’s Taproom, Goodwill, Lily’s Bistro and Corner Kitchen.

Buttacavoli gave away free tickets to surprised diners and shoppers along the way. 

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