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New Dayton diner launches new breakfast and lunch specials today

Published: Monday, July 24, 2017 @ 11:37 AM

'Stuffed Breakfast Pepper Rings' is 416 Diner's newest breakfast special.
Photo via Guy Fragmin
'Stuffed Breakfast Pepper Rings' is 416 Diner's newest breakfast special.(Photo via Guy Fragmin)

Since their opening earlier this month, 416 Diner in the Oregon District has been rumored to have some of the best pepperoni rolls this side of West Virginia.

>> 7 things to know about the new ‘416 Diner’

The breakfast, lunch and late-night diner is growing its menu with its very first breakfast and lunch specials. Available as of today, you’re going to need a few napkins to finish these sizzling specialties. 

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Scenes from 416 Diner's opening night in downtown Dayton. TOM GILLIAM/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER(HANDOUT)

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Stuffed Breakfast Pepper Rings. You read that right— If you wake up early enough, you can begin your morning by sinking your teeth into inch-thick grilled pepper rings filled with sausage and cheddar. This sinful breakfast dish is then topped-off with an egg cooked to your preference. 

The Pepper Rings are available every day at opening, but only until supplies last that day. 

After 11 a.m., try the new Black and Blue Burger special for $10— “amazing Blue Marble Jack cheese slices melted atop 416’s black peppered burger.” 

Scenes from 416 Diner's opening night in downtown Dayton. TOM GILLIAM/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER(HANDOUT)

>> New ‘416 Diner’ to have FIRST EVER walk-up window

If you’re wanting a lighter lunch fare without sacrificing taste, the Heirloom Tomato Salad is another new option after 11 a.m. For this one, 416 tosses “beautiful heirloom tomatoes with cucumber slices, red onions and chives, served on a bed of greens, and topped with crumbled blue cheese.”

>> Awesome photos of new Canal Street Deli & Arcade

Check out the entire 416 Diner menu here

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Golden Lamb restaurant to add outdoor dining area

Published: Sunday, July 22, 2018 @ 12:01 PM
Updated: Sunday, July 22, 2018 @ 12:01 PM


            This a rendering of a change proposed to the side of the historic Golden Lamb Inn in Lebanon. A veranda, interior alterations and an exterior addition are proposed to the non-original 1964 portion of the Black Horse Inn part of the in downtown Lebanon.
This a rendering of a change proposed to the side of the historic Golden Lamb Inn in Lebanon. A veranda, interior alterations and an exterior addition are proposed to the non-original 1964 portion of the Black Horse Inn part of the in downtown Lebanon.

Expansion plans by the owners of the Golden Lamb Inn are only the latest for the iconic hotel, restaurant and bar’s more than two centuries of existence.

Last week, the Lebanon Planning Commission approved a plan expected to cost more than $1 million and add a veranda for outdoor dining and interior improvements on the non-original, south side of the building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places for architectural and cultural reasons.

“The Golden Lamb is the oldest Inn in the State of Ohio,” according to materials filed with the application for the changes.

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RELATED: Golden Lamb renovating dining rooms, kitchen and corridors

The building at 27 S. Broadway has been visited by luminaries of American history ranging from Charles Dickens to Annie Oakley and about a dozen presidents.

On Sept. 19, 1968, Ronald Reagan, at the time California’s governor, campaigned for Congressman Donald E. “Buz” Lukens who had supported Reagan at the Republican Party’s Presidential Convention that summer.

“We want to invest in the Golden Lamb to keep it viable for years to come,” General Manager Bill Kilimnik said last week, sitting in one of the historic dining rooms in the original brick structure built around 1815.

“There’s a fine line between historic and shabby,” he added.

The Golden Lamb was originally built in 1803 by Jonas Seaman and operated as a “house of public entertainment,” according to its history. The name came from a sign decorated with a golden lamb.

Since then, there have been numerous alterations, leading to the veranda and expansion approved last week.

“Project would include removal of the 1964 exterior steps and modification to the 1964 facade to accommodate a new brick-clad entry vestibule providing access to the first floor and basement and an elevated veranda for outdoor dining,” according to staff comments prepared for the planning commission.

“This work will continue the evolution of the building in a historically sensitive way and enhance the connection to the adjacent park and streetscape,” Kilimnik said in the application required because the building sits in the city’s historic district.

The expansion would replace the entrance to the gift shop and Black Horse Tavern, where the bar will be expanded from two to eight beer taps and make room for a Cruvinet wine storage system, Kilimnik said.

RELATED: Golden Lamb marks 200 years

Liquor wasn’t always on the menu of what was a “temperance hotel” called the Bradley House when Dickens visited in 1842.

“We dine soon after with the boarders in the house, and have nothing to drink but tea and coffee. As they are both very bad, and the water is worse, I ask for brandy; but it is a temperance hotel, and spirits were not to be had for love or money,” Dickens wrote in his American Notes for General Circulation travelogue.

RELATED: From “house of entertainment’ to Golden Lamb Inn

At last week’s meeting, several planning commissioners agreed the expansion would look better than the current south side view, including the tavern entrance.

Lebanon Mayor Amy Brewer urged Kilimnik to pursue with city staff the development of a path through the small gazebo park sharing the northwest corner of Broadway and Main Street with the Golden Lamb.

Across Broadway is the historic city hall, across Main Street a Carnegie library.

“I am so excited for this project to be happening,” Brewer said during the planning commission meeting. “Awesome.”

MORE: Remembering McCain-Palin’s Golden Lamb visit

Part of the building’s significance is based on the FederalStyle architecture associated with the early years of the United States, particularly from 1785 and to 1815.

“These buildings represent a period time in history,” said Patrick Hansford, a local architect specializing in historic preservation, after reviewing the plan. “These buildings continue to have good life.”

After reviewing the plans, Loren Gannon, a retired state historic preservation officer, welcomed the expansion.

“You want it be kept viable. You can do that and still have a nice design,” he said.

History buffs and other tourists rent the 17 rooms on floors above the entrance, main dining room and tavern.

The expansion is one piece of an overall plan dating back about 10 years, Kilimnik said.

RELATED: Golden Lamb remains open during remodeling

“We’ve always had a desire to add some outdoor seating,” Kilimnik said.

The Grant room has already been updated with modern luxuries. The Dickens dining room is currently being redone with a Victorian library theme.

Kilimnik estimated four to five new jobs would be created to manage the new space able to serve about 60 outside. If all goes well, he hoped to hold a grand opening in May.

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Waynesville cafe moving forward with alcohol expansion

Published: Friday, June 15, 2018 @ 10:18 AM


            Jeremy Green and Megan Buckle last December at the counter of Kee-Mo-Sabe Espresso & Gelato in Cobblestone Village in Waynesville. STAFF / LAWRENCE BUDD
Jeremy Green and Megan Buckle last December at the counter of Kee-Mo-Sabe Espresso & Gelato in Cobblestone Village in Waynesville. STAFF / LAWRENCE BUDD

A Waynesville cafe applied for a full liquor license this week and plans to serve a full range of alcoholic beverages with special dinners, according to owner Jeremy Green.

On Tuesday, Green Family Concepts, doing business as the Cobblestone Cafe, applied for a liquor license permitting sale of beer, wine, liquor, according to this morning’s Ohio Division of Liquor Control weekly roundup of applications.

RELATED: Waynesville cafe to add wine, upscale liquor bar

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“The Cobblestone Village Cafe will soon be expanding to include evening services Thursday through Saturday,” Green said in a Facebook message. “The owners Jeremy and Angela Greene received overwhelming feedback from the community to pursue hosting dinner with alcoholic beverages available. After a year of ownership and successfully passing weekly and Sunday sales votes, they are moving forward.”

MORE: Permit denied for Huber Heights bar

The cafe, at 10 N. Main St. in Waynesville’s historic downtown, plans to serve dinners, possibly including “a French-inspired Tapas theme” from 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

Staff writer Mark Fisher contributed to this report.

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Food trucks in Oakwood? New rules could be on the way.

Published: Tuesday, June 05, 2018 @ 4:56 PM


            Oakwood city officials are considering allowing food trucks, like The Flyby BBQ food truck, to operate on public streets. FILE
            Contributed
Oakwood city officials are considering allowing food trucks, like The Flyby BBQ food truck, to operate on public streets. FILE(Contributed)

City officials are considering legislation that for the first time would allow food trucks to do business on Oakwood streets.

Oakwood Law Director Rob Jacques said that food trucks are everywhere now and residents seem to be in favor of having them in Oakwood.

“I think back 5 or 6 years ago, and I don’t really remember seeing them around — it is kind of a new thing,” he explained. “Oakwood has had an ordinance in place for years that you could not sell anything in the streets, and that has been our basis for saying we really don’t allow food trucks here.”

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MORE: New BBQ restaurant coming to the Mall at Fairfield Commons

Oakwood schools hosted an event at the end of the school year that had food trucks, but officials had a road closed. Other recent events on private property included food trucks. Those events had some residents asking: Why can’t we have food trucks in other parts of Oakwood?

Local resident Cara Heib said she’s glad officials are considering the move and hopes they to see ice cream trucks on the streets as well.

MORE: Oakwood schools considering facilities changes and seeking feedback

At Monday night’s council meeting, a pair of ordinances were introduced. One ordinance would create an exception to the prohibition for the “sale of anything in the street” verbiage that is already in the books, and the other establishes the framework that would govern food trucks that want to operate in the city.

“Our ordinances are largely modeled on ones that are already in effect in other cities and are working well there, so we are sort of taking the me-too approach,” Jacques said.

MORE: Drugs, thefts, school safety top Kettering residents’ safety concerns

Oakwood’s charter requires two readings for an ordinance unless counsel waives a second reading, which they didn’t do on Monday.

“On July 16 there will be a second reading of each ordinance, and council will likely vote that night. If they are passed, it would become effective 30 days after that. So in mid-August is when we would be able to say we will have a law in the books allowing food trucks, so vendors would be able to come here and request a license,” Jacques said.

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He said the city is not looking to gain additional money from adding food trucks.

“The revenue stream aspect is something that we are not looking at,” he explained. “We want to make sure we know who is coming to town and setting up. We want to make sure they have the proper license and inspection. We want the citizens to feel comfortable knowing who is operating the food trucks in our streets.”

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5 salads perfect for summer

Published: Saturday, May 21, 2016 @ 12:00 AM
Updated: Friday, May 11, 2018 @ 2:24 PM

Meadowlark’s chopped salad with tofu. Contributed Photo by Alexis Larsen
Meadowlark’s chopped salad with tofu. Contributed Photo by Alexis Larsen

I’m always on the lookout for a good salad. This time of year that’s especially true.

 

Something light, something refreshing, something summery.

 

In that spirit, here are five salads that I’ve enjoyed recently that I think you will too:

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 >> 7 things to look forward to when the weather warms up
(Tina Phan)

Coco’s Bistro

 

Bourbon Street Salad

 

Put a pile of mixed greens, several large bourbon glazed shrimp to rest on top, a generous sprinkling of applewood smoked bacon and fontina cheese mixed with diced tomatoes in a toasted pecan vinaigrette, and finish it off with a crown of spicy onion straws and you have the Coco’s Bourbon Street Salad ($17.50). It’s on the pricy side, but the flavors are delightful. This paired with a cold iced tea out on the patio will be heaven this summer.

 

250 Warren St., Dayton

 

(937) 228-2626 or www.228coco.com

 

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(Diedra Laird/McClatchy/Tribune)

Corner Kitchen

 

Arugula and Goat Cheese Salad

 

Goat cheese isn't for everyone, but it's definitely for me. This salad ($6) with dollops of pillowy soft, savory goat cheese and a sprinkling of cashews and mandarin oranges tossed in an unassuming citrus vinaigrette that compliments nicely is a delicious way to lead into your entrée, or pair with a protein — chicken ($5), steak ($8), salmon ($7, and my choice) or tofu ($2) — and it becomes a meal. Their caesar salad ($6) features white anchovies, which also gets a thumbs up in my book.

 

613 E. 5th St., Dayton

 
(937) 719-0999 or www.afinerdiner.com

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