Paper company plans Wapakoneta mill, with 300 new jobs

Published: Thursday, December 07, 2017 @ 10:27 AM

Pratt Industries in Lewisburg opened its $44 million facility there in September 2014. The plant had 140 workers and saved the equivalent of up to 10,000 trees a day by using 100 percent recycled paper from Pratt’s mill system, company officials said at the time. LISA POWELL / STAFF PHOTO
Pratt Industries in Lewisburg opened its $44 million facility there in September 2014. The plant had 140 workers and saved the equivalent of up to 10,000 trees a day by using 100 percent recycled paper from Pratt’s mill system, company officials said at the time. LISA POWELL / STAFF PHOTO

A Wapakoneta paper mill is planning an expansion that will create 300 new jobs.

Pratt Paper, LLC, in Auglaize County, expects to create 300 full-time positions, generating $14.4 million in new annual payroll as a result of the company’s new project in Wapakoneta, the Ohio Tax Credit Authority said Monday.

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Pratt Paper makes corrugated packaging. The Tax Credit Authority approved a 1.263 percent, eight-year “job creation” tax credit for this project.

A paper industry news web site said the company plans to build a mill that will have a capacity of 360,000 metric throughput yield of corrugated medium and linerboard made out of recycled fiber.

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Construction on the mill is set to start in March, with the new paper machine perhaps ready to start operating in the fourth quarter of 2019, the web site said.

Pratt Industries also has a Lewisburg recycled packaging and paper facility, which was opened three years ago.

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New study lowers chemical water safety standards to Dayton’s current levels

Published: Thursday, June 21, 2018 @ 10:34 AM

Water well field at Huffman Dam is operated by the city of Dayton. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Water well field at Huffman Dam is operated by the city of Dayton. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

A new study on potentially dangerous substances found in water is coinciding with the city of Dayton’s own recent findings in a startling coincidence.

Paul Buszka, a supervisory hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Indianapolis, pointed to the release Wednesday of a draft study about the risks posed by PFAS substances (polyfluoralkyl) from the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. 

The study lowers the level at which no harm would be expected into the single digit parts-per-trillion (ppt) range.

RELATEDExpert: Dayton’s water should be monitored 

According to the study, the proposed “minimum risk levels” of PFAS equate to about 7-ppt and 11-ppt for two compounds.

Those levels are close to levels of similar compounds found in local water this year.

Dayton and Montgomery County have been sending customers notices with the results of recent testing of treated water leaving the city’s Ottawa Water Treatment Plant. The results of March testing show PFAS detected at a level of 7 to 13 parts per trillion.

Experts are reacting to the new study carefully.

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“If you’re getting close to those levels — and again this (draft study) was just released — just the idea that those compounds are present is a reason for people to sample and to understand the extent of the issue better,” Buszka said in an interview. “That’s probably as far as I would go with it.”

He referred further questions to the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

An Ohio EPA spokesman took questions about the study but had no immediate responses. 

 

“Looks like the lower exposure levels may be of concern, although I have not had time to read carefully, only skim,” said Rita Loch-Caruso, a professor of toxicology and water expert at the University of Michigan.

RELATEDDayton water chemicals prompt warning to local residents 

“So what advice to give? It is hard to say without a more careful review,” Loch-Caruso added.

U.S. Rep. Mike Turner, R-Dayton, applauded the release of the draft findings Thursday.

“This is a matter of public health and safety,” Turner said in a statement. “Based on this information, I encourage federal, state, and local environmental regulators to examine whether they are appropriately communicating the risks presented by and adequately addressing the presence of PFOS and PFOA in drinking water. We must ensure agencies at all levels are using the most reliable data and best available science to ensure our drinking water remains safe.”

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Here’s why Dayton-area home sales slowed in May

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 11:31 AM

Bill Lackey/Staff
Bill Lackey/Staff

A record low supply of homes slowed the pace of home sales in the Dayton region.

The number of Dayton-area homes for sold in May dropped 2 percent compared to the same time last year, with 1,626 home sale reported for the month.

MORE: Dayton-area home sales up in April, inventory tight

One reason for the dip is the limited supply of homes available to buy, according to Dayton Realtors, which represents Montgomery, Greene, Darke, Warren, and Preble Counties.

The association said there is just a 2.4 months supply of homes available, which is a record low for the month of May.

While you might have limited homes to chose from, you’ll also likely have to pay more than you would have last year.

May’s median sales price came in at $145,000, up 8 percent from last year. The average price of $171,061 was also up 8 percent from the same time last year.

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Sales volume generated by May’s activity totaled $272.8 million, which is up 6.5 percent since last May.

There were 2,149 new listings added in May, down 1 percent from last year’s 2,173, while year-to-date listings tallied 8,710, a 2.8 percent decrease from the 8,960 submitted through May of last year.

Total inventory was low, showing 3,968 properties available at month’s end, representing a supply of only 2.4 months based on May’s pace of sales.

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JUST IN: Mexican restaurant to build new area location

Published: Thursday, June 21, 2018 @ 8:57 AM

Contributed
Contributed

La Piñata Mexican Grill & Bar has plans to build a new standalone restaurant in Centerville.

The restaurant has submitted plans to build the restaurant at the intersection of Sheehan Road and Ohio 48 at the site of a former Coldwell Banker location.

La Piñata has a location just a block away at 1069 S Main St. in the same shopping center as the Kroger Marketplace. City officials said that restaurant will be closed when the new building is built.

» RELATED: Wright State to layoff up to 40; expects $10M loss next year

Plans show the new restaurant will have an outside patio that will seat 36 and the inside will seat 127.

The restaurant could not be reached for comment.

RELATED: Bill’s Donuts to close for renovations

Coldwell Banker Heritage opened a new modern office at 8534 Yankee St. that it renamed it Coldwell Banker at Yankee Centre.

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Here’s how Dayton air show officials prepare for worst case scenarios

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 2:55 PM


            Roger Doctor, Vectren Dayton Air Show public safety director began working on plans for this year’s show immediately following the 2017 air show. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
            Ty Greenlees
Roger Doctor, Vectren Dayton Air Show public safety director began working on plans for this year’s show immediately following the 2017 air show. TY GREENLEES / STAFF(Ty Greenlees)

Headlined by the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, the 44th Vectren Dayton Air Show will draw thousands of people to the Dayton International Airport on Saturday and Sunday as one of the region’s biggest events each year.

Performers for the show include: TORA! TORA! TORA!, Sean D. Tucker, Vicky Benzing, Redline Aerobatics Team, Screamin’ Sasquatch and the B-17 Movie Memphis Belle.

John Klatt, pilot of the Jack Link’s Screamin’ Sasquatch, said the Dayton Air Show has a unique atmosphere and that it’s a top air show destination for performers in the U.S.

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“We’re excited to put on a show for you, and we’re excited for everyone to come out this weekend,” he said.

The air show takes almost a full year of preparation, said Roger Doctor, public safety director for the air show. He said security protocols have not changed this year after recent mass shootings. He said the air show isn’t a “soft target,” with police officers very present.

Security personnel will be placed at each gate entrance, and police officers will be around the air show grounds to provide security. Guests’ bags and belongings will be checked for prohibited items.

They also prepare for crashes and disasters involving aircraft. Last year, a Thunderbird jet flipped over after taxiing at the Dayton International Airport.

» PHOTOS: The Dayton Air Show through the years

The crash happened on June 23 prior to the air show and injured Pilot Capt. Erik Gonsalves and Tactical Aircraft Maintainer Staff Sgt. Kenneth Cordova. The F-16 sustained significant damage, and the Thunderbirds cancelled all performances at the air show.

The Thunderbirds jet mishap was the first major aviation-related incident at the air show since the fatal crash of a wing walker and a pilot in front of thousands of spectators on June 22, 2013.

John Cuday, president of the Virginia-based International Council of Air Shows, said air shows are safe for spectators. No spectator at an airshow — which has different rules than air races — has been killed since the 1950s because of safety measures in place, he said.

“There is no motor sport in the world that has the safety record of spectators that we do,” he said.

The danger is primarily to pilots, he said.

“The flying that these guys do is more dangerous than standard flying, but they take this risk knowingly” and mitigate risk, he said.

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In what he described as a four-legged stool, the first safety measure is distance between pilots and people. Small planes, for example, stay at least 500 feet away from spectators. Jets operate up to 1,500 feet away.

“I’ve actually charted where the wreckage has landed and that system has acted precisely as it was to work,” he said.

Additionally, pilots’ knowledge and flight routines are evaluated every year. Acrobatic maneuvers toward spectators are banned, and an acrobatic sky box sets aside restricted airspace for performances.

“That’s the four-legged stool we have come to rely on and it’s worked very, very effectively to protecting spectators,” he said.

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