severe weather


Ohio lawmakers weigh sports betting possibilities

Published: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 @ 11:29 AM

Derrick Mason, a Baltimore receiver, scores a touchdown against the Bengals in this September 2010 game. FILE
Derrick Mason, a Baltimore receiver, scores a touchdown against the Bengals in this September 2010 game. FILE

It’s a better-than-safe bet that sports betting will become an issue for Ohio lawmakers at some point.

But they will most likely take up the issue at their own pace. After Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling allowing states to make laws allowing sports betting, Southwest Ohio legislators don’t think Ohio will take any action quickly.

Sports betting today is illegal in Ohio. Even after the new Supreme Court ruling, states are free to allow or disallow wagering on sports.

In Ohio today, however, the General Assembly already has a full calendar from here to Memorial Day, said Ohio Rep. Niraj Antani, R-Miamisburg. A vote for a new Ohio House speaker was set for Tuesday.

MORECourt OKs sale of local manufacturing plant 

“There are other things that are top of mind,” Antani said.

“We can work up a bill as fast as the General Assembly wants to move,” said Sen. Bill Coley, R-Liberty Twp. “But I think I know my colleagues well enough to say that they will be thoughtful, they will be deliberate in their process here.”

“This is a clean slate,” Coley added. “We can move in any direction people want to move.”

However, he identified three immediate “major” concerns with sports betting.

MOREFederal bankruptcy ruling could impact DP&L customers

Consumer protections should be in place, so that the books who take bets are clearly able to pay winners, he said.

Legislation must somehow attempt to address “problem gaming” and addiction to gambling, Coley said.

And he added, “You don’t want to damage the brand that sports has.” Legislation must address the concerns that some will have of athletes “throwing games” or of gambling influencing performance.

Plus, state government will need to collect taxes and handle an array of other imperatives.

MORESears may sell this legendary brand 

“Something as big as this is not something we should do quickly,” Antani said. “We should take our time, vet the issue, talk to members of the public — and we should talk with the different sports franchises and see what they want to do as well.”

Added Antani: “If we’re going to do this, it should be done right.”

Coley said he expected that he and his colleagues will have a “cursory discussion” on the issue Tuesday or Wednesday.

MORENew home construction is down in the Dayton region

“It’s kind of all over the map,” Coley said. “People who are strongly for it, people who are strongly against it.”

There’s also the question of technology. Coley expects some states will allow people to bet with their mobile phones.

“It’s important for us to hear from the public,” Antani said. “We as legislators are representatives of the people.”

Antani said he has heard only “a little” from constituents and colleagues on the issue. “A couple of people have made some Pete Rose jokes.”

As new as it is, the issue is already creating division. Ohio Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray has said he would consider allowing sports betting, while a spokesman for current Gov. John Kasich has indicated that the issue is not a priority for him.

Greene County’s Mike DeWine, the Republican candidate for governor and Ohio’s attorney general, has typically opposed expanding gambling in Ohio, a spokesman for DeWine has noted.

Penn National Gaming, which owns the Hollywood Gaming at Dayton Raceway racino — one of Penn’s four Ohio casinos — released a statement saying the company was pleased with the Supreme Court’s decision to end the federal ban on sports betting.

“Sports betting could be another amenity at our Hollywood properties and help generate additional visitation, as well as drive incremental tax revenue for Ohio,” Penn said in a statement e-mailed to this media outlet. “We welcome the opportunity to discuss legal sports betting with legislators in Columbus and other key stakeholders.”

Gambling is already big business in Ohio. Statewide gaming revenues totaled $71.8 million in April, up less than a percent from 2017.

And the Ohio Casino Control Commission recently said gambling receipts are higher than they were last year through the year’s first four months. State numbers show total gaming revenues from the state’s four casinos were $284.2 million through April, up 2.2 percent from the same point in 2017.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Non-stop Paris flight set to begin this week from airport in region

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 2:58 PM

Ile de France is a north-central region thats home to Paris and Versailles, an easily navigable area with famous sights such as the Eiffel Tower, Louvre and 18th-century Palace of Versailles. (Dreamstime)
Ile de France is a north-central region thats home to Paris and Versailles, an easily navigable area with famous sights such as the Eiffel Tower, Louvre and 18th-century Palace of Versailles. (Dreamstime)

Delta’s Indianapolis-to-Paris flight begins Thursday.

Delta, with joint venture partner Air France KLM, last year announced that it will bring nonstop trans-Atlantic service from Indianapolis to its European hub at Paris-Charles de Gaulle starting May 24, 2018.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: 5 amazing flight deals we found at local airports for summer travel

“Indiana and the Indianapolis metropolitan area have long been an important part of our route network and we are honored that Delta will be the first U.S. carrier to take Indiana nonstop to Europe,” Bob Cortelyou, Delta’s senior vice president-network planning, said in the announcement last September.

MOREPopulation, wages drag pace of new home building

Delta offers service from Indianapolis to 13 destinations and 37 peak-day departures, the airline said. With the new service to Paris, customers from across the Hoosier State and the region will have one-stop connections at Paris-Charles de Gaulle to more than 100 destinations in Europe, Africa, Middle East and India.

Delta’s on-board experience between Indianapolis and Paris will be on Boeing 767-300ER aircraft, equipped with 25 fully lie-flat seats in Delta One, 29 seats Delta Comfort+ and 171 seats in the Main Cabin.

MORENew University of Dayton building: What we know today 

Every seat has access to wi-fi, free personal in-flight seat-back entertainment screens as well as power ports. Complimentary meals and beverages will also be provided in all cabins of service.

Delta’s Indianapolis-Paris service will be scheduled to operate as follows:

DL500 Indianapolis (IND) at 6:20 p.m. Paris (CDG) at 8:45 a.m. (next day)

DL501 Paris (CDG) at 1:15 p.m. Indianapolis (IND) at 4:35 p.m.

Trending - Most Read Stories

5 amazing flight deals we found at local airports for summer travel

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 8:16 AM

Ready for a vacation? Follow Clark Howard's method to find the best fares!

It’s time to book your next vacation.

Discount airlines flooded regional airports with cheap, new flights to destinations across the world. WOWair, Frontier Airlines and Allegiant Air added new flights in Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton — lowering airfare for eager travelers in the region. There are plenty of cheap flight options to take advantage of this summer.

» WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: How to book cheap flights

Here are five of the best flight deals this news organization found at local airports:

1. Head to the beach from Dayton 

The ocean is calling. Book a ticket from the Dayton International Airpot to Punta Gorda Airport in Florida for a week-long beach vacation. From Monday, June 18 to Monday, June 25, travelers can pay as letter as $185 round-trip for a ticket on Allegiant Air. Allegiant flights to Punta Gorda are available on Mondays and Fridays.

» Your next weekend trip: 20 things to do, see, eat in Cincinnati

2. Jet off to Iceland for less than $300

It’s cheaper than ever to hitch a flight overseas from a local airport. Icelandic discount airline WOW air introduced service at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport earlier this month. Leave the Cincinnati airport on July 4 at 12:50 a.m. Your WOW basic ticket to Reykjavik, Iceland will cost you $109.99. You’ll leave Iceland on Wednesday, July 25. Your ticket home will cost you $159.99. You spend a total of $270 on your roundtrip travel.

3. Spend some time in the Lone Star State 

Frontier is offering one-way fare to Austin, Texas from Columbus for as low as $59 if you purchase the tickets by May 31. The deal is valid on tickets for Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Frontier offers best deals on their website every week.

4. Bon voyage! Paris is waiting for you 

You can actually afford international travel if you look for the right deals. Head off to Paris from Cincinnati with WOW air. You can leave July 30 and return Aug. 13. Your roundtrip fare could be as cheap as $610. WOW air fare varies by date so make sure to shop around to get the best deal.

» TRENDING: Meghan Markle has an extraordinary connection to Ohio

5. Go to Myrtle Beach for less than $100 

Fly from the Dayton International Airport to Myrtle Beach for as low as $100 roundtrip in July. Allegiant serves several cities from Dayton including: Daytona Beach, Orlando and Tampa, among others.

FIVE FAST READS

• With a harsh hurricane season expected, how do storms get named?

• Salmonella outbreak: 5 times food-borne illnesses wreaked havoc in Ohio

• This $2 million Warren County estate is a rural paradise with a resort-style pool

• 15 memories, moments at Elder-Beerman that influenced your lives

Trending - Most Read Stories

New UD office building: What we know now

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 11:11 AM

The University of Dayton announced plans to build a new facility at 1401 S. Main St. The new office building will house The Dayton Foundation, the Dayton Development Coalition and the Universitys Fitz Center for Leadership in Community.
The University of Dayton announced plans to build a new facility at 1401 S. Main St. The new office building will house The Dayton Foundation, the Dayton Development Coalition and the Universitys Fitz Center for Leadership in Community.

The University of Dayton will soon build another campus building, this one expected to serve as home to the Dayton Development Coalition, the Dayton Foundation and the college’s Fitz Center for Leadership in Community. 

This is not just another campus building, but a new structure in the southern part of the city that has long been ripe for development potential — and has seen plenty of development already.

Here are four things to know about the announcement:

  

1. Location

The to-be-constructed building at 1401 S. Main St. will be located between Emerson’s Helix Innovation Center and Universal 1 Credit Union. It will be 38,000 square feet and will include offices for each organization along with shared meeting spaces, according to UD.

RELATED: UD building new office building on South Main 

The university plans to launch construction this year. Once construction starts, the new facility will take only a year to build, said UD provost Paul Benson.

2. The process is far along

But it’s not quite final yet. The last details are being worked out.

Both the foundation and the development coalition have signed letters of intent to lease space in the new facility, UD said Friday. Both the foundation and the coalition are today located downtown in the Kettering Tower, Dayton’s tallest building.

MORE: Three Ohio cities job-seekers are trying to escape 

The new building will put the coalition within steps of General Electric’s $51 million EPIScenter, which opened in 2013, and Emerson’s $35 million Helix Innovation Center built in 2016.

3. Growing is what UD does

Building and expanding have become UD hallmarks in nearly the past two decades.

 

Land purchases more than a decade ago set the stage for the EPIScenter and the Emerson Helix buildings.

In 2005, UD — then under the leadership of UD President Daniel Curran (today, UD president emeritus) — finalized the purchase of 49 acres of NCR Corp. property for $25 million. The property ran from Brown Street to the Great Miami River.

MORE: Fairgrounds: UD, Premier outline when, where first work could happen

Then, more than four years later, UD purchased 115 acres, including NCR’s former world headquarters at 1700 S. Patterson Blvd. and the 48-acre Old River Park property, for $18 million.

That land today is home to UD’s second biggest building (the former NCR HQ) and is considered the university’s “River Campus.”

By 2009, UD had already invested more than $200 million in new construction and renovation just in the past decade.

4. The former fairgrounds are nearby

Meanwhile, the just-announced building will be close to the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds off South Main, across from Miami Valley Hospital.

UD and Premier Health jointly own those fairgrounds — and the future awaits that property.

The 38-acre fairgrounds redevelopment is one of the most anticipated projects in recent Dayton history. Though Premier and UD have not made a final decision for the fairgrounds, they’ve proposed a number of ideas that include housing, retail and green space.

Planning NEXT, the master planning contracted to the project, in January unveiled the early vision for the fairgrounds, which calls for the first phase of development to have about 245 units of housing, 225,000 square feet of office, 60,000 square feet of retail and four acres of urban agriculture.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Study: A trio of Ohio cities job-seekers are trying to escape

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 9:59 AM

The Proctor & Gamble headquarters complex in downtown Cincinnati. According to jobs and recruiting web site Glassdoor, Cincinnati is among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs in other cities. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
The Proctor & Gamble headquarters complex in downtown Cincinnati. According to jobs and recruiting web site Glassdoor, Cincinnati is among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs in other cities. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Three big Ohio cities are among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs elsewhere, according to a list from Glassdoor, a job and recruiting web site.

Cincinnati is No. 9 and Cleveland is No. 10 on that list, according to Glassdoor. Columbus finds itself ranked at No. 6.

A city in Rhode Island led that list of the most workers applying elsewhere for employment, the company said.

MOREPace of new home building in Dayton area slows

“The college town of Providence, R.I. topped the list of cities with the highest percentage (52.2 percent) of candidates in the metro applying for jobs elsewhere,” the site said. “Specifically, this means that more than half of job seekers in Providence are applying to jobs in other areas.”

The percentage of job seekers in Cincinnati applying for jobs in others cities was 36.2 percent, according to Glassdoor. In Cleveland, that percentage was 35.3 percent. Columbus — home of course to Ohio’s biggest university, Ohio State University — the percentage was 41.4 percent.

One of the cities to which job-seekers in Cincinnati were most likely to apply, interestingly, is Dayton, according to the study. 

In fact, among the top 10 job destinations for applicants in Cincinnati is Dayton, the study said, second only to New York City.

MORENew owner promises to bring downtown Dayton building back to life

The top two hoped-for destinations among job seekers are San Francisco, California and New York City, the study claims.

Glassdoor said the information is based on applications on its own web site, based on a sample of more than 668,000 online job applications started on Glassdoor from January 8 to 14 this year, for the 40 largest metro areas in the United States.

You can read more about the study here. 

Trending - Most Read Stories