severe weather


Judge gives workers suing Fuyao class-action status

Published: Thursday, February 08, 2018 @ 8:57 AM

Workers in the Fuyao Glass America Moraine plant stack newly manufactured windshields in 2016. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Workers in the Fuyao Glass America Moraine plant stack newly manufactured windshields in 2016. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

A federal judge has granted class-action status to Fuyao Glass America workers and former workers in a lawsuit against the company.

The class-action status will include current and former Fuyao production workers in the last three years, and attorneys for those suing Fuyao now have permission to contact those people.

The workers involved in the lawsuit so far — about 13 — have alleged that the Moraine manufacturer of auto safety glass has not properly paid workers for overtime work or did not completely relieve them of duties for unpaid meal breaks and other times.

RELATEDWorkers seek to join class-action lawsuit against Fuyao

The company has denied the allegations and is fighting the lawsuit, which was first filed in Dayton’s federal court last June by a former Fuyao employee.

“The allegations in the complaint and the plaintiffs’ declarations agree that defendant’s (Fuyao’s) staff share similar primary job duties and responsibilities and are alleged to be victims of the same policy, decision and practice to deny them overtime pay,” wrote Judge Thomas Rose, in a decision dated Wednesday.

RELATEDFormer Fuyao worker seeks class-action status in lawsuit

“This suffices to consider plaintiffs and putative collective members and sub-class members similarly situated for purposes of conditional certification,” Rose added.

The judge ordered Fuyao to give plaintiffs’ attorneys a list of prospective class members — people who have worked for Fuyao in the last three years.

Fuyao has 14 days to provide the plaintiffs’ attorneys the workers’ and former workers’ names, job positions, last-known mailing addresses, last-known telephone numbers, email addresses and other information.

RELATEDFormer Fuyao exec sues over termination; Fuyao calls suit ‘meritless’

Attorneys for those suing Fuyao have also asked to give workers and former workers 60 days to “opt in” to the lawsuit, Rose wrote. (In an amended filing, Rose raised that number to 90 days.)

Attorneys may contact workers via U.S. postal mail and email.

Earlier this month, Scott Young, an attorney for Fuyao, said: “Fuyao Glass America (FGA) denies any allegations by the plaintiffs that they were not properly paid by FGA.”

Young and his colleagues then took the position “that class certification is not appropriate.”

A message seeking comment was sent Thursday morning to attorneys representing Fuyao.

Trending - Most Read Stories

New UD office building: What we know now

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 11:11 AM

The University of Dayton announced plans to build a new facility at 1401 S. Main St. The new office building will house The Dayton Foundation, the Dayton Development Coalition and the Universitys Fitz Center for Leadership in Community.
The University of Dayton announced plans to build a new facility at 1401 S. Main St. The new office building will house The Dayton Foundation, the Dayton Development Coalition and the Universitys Fitz Center for Leadership in Community.

The University of Dayton will soon build another campus building, this one expected to serve as home to the Dayton Development Coalition, the Dayton Foundation and the college’s Fitz Center for Leadership in Community. 

This is not just another campus building, but a new structure in the southern part of the city that has long been ripe for development potential — and has seen plenty of development already.

Here are four things to know about the announcement:

  

1. Location

The to-be-constructed building at 1401 S. Main St. will be located between Emerson’s Helix Innovation Center and Universal 1 Credit Union. It will be 38,000 square feet and will include offices for each organization along with shared meeting spaces, according to UD.

RELATED: UD building new office building on South Main 

The university plans to launch construction this year. Once construction starts, the new facility will take only a year to build, said UD provost Paul Benson.

2. The process is far along

But it’s not quite final yet. The last details are being worked out.

Both the foundation and the development coalition have signed letters of intent to lease space in the new facility, UD said Friday. Both the foundation and the coalition are today located downtown in the Kettering Tower, Dayton’s tallest building.

MORE: Three Ohio cities job-seekers are trying to escape 

The new building will put the coalition within steps of General Electric’s $51 million EPIScenter, which opened in 2013, and Emerson’s $35 million Helix Innovation Center built in 2016.

3. Growing is what UD does

Building and expanding have become UD hallmarks in nearly the past two decades.

 

Land purchases more than a decade ago set the stage for the EPIScenter and the Emerson Helix buildings.

In 2005, UD — then under the leadership of UD President Daniel Curran (today, UD president emeritus) — finalized the purchase of 49 acres of NCR Corp. property for $25 million. The property ran from Brown Street to the Great Miami River.

MORE: Fairgrounds: UD, Premier outline when, where first work could happen

Then, more than four years later, UD purchased 115 acres, including NCR’s former world headquarters at 1700 S. Patterson Blvd. and the 48-acre Old River Park property, for $18 million.

That land today is home to UD’s second biggest building (the former NCR HQ) and is considered the university’s “River Campus.”

By 2009, UD had already invested more than $200 million in new construction and renovation just in the past decade.

4. The former fairgrounds are nearby

Meanwhile, the just-announced building will be close to the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds off South Main, across from Miami Valley Hospital.

UD and Premier Health jointly own those fairgrounds — and the future awaits that property.

The 38-acre fairgrounds redevelopment is one of the most anticipated projects in recent Dayton history. Though Premier and UD have not made a final decision for the fairgrounds, they’ve proposed a number of ideas that include housing, retail and green space.

Planning NEXT, the master planning contracted to the project, in January unveiled the early vision for the fairgrounds, which calls for the first phase of development to have about 245 units of housing, 225,000 square feet of office, 60,000 square feet of retail and four acres of urban agriculture.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Non-stop Paris flight set to begin this week from airport in region

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 2:58 PM


            Ile de France is a north-central region thats home to Paris and Versailles, an easily navigable area with famous sights such as the Eiffel Tower, Louvre and 18th-century Palace of Versailles. (Dreamstime)
Ile de France is a north-central region thats home to Paris and Versailles, an easily navigable area with famous sights such as the Eiffel Tower, Louvre and 18th-century Palace of Versailles. (Dreamstime)

Delta’s Indianapolis-to-Paris flight begins Thursday.

Delta, with joint venture partner Air France KLM, last year announced that it will bring nonstop trans-Atlantic service from Indianapolis to its European hub at Paris-Charles de Gaulle starting May 24, 2018.

“Indiana and the Indianapolis metropolitan area have long been an important part of our route network and we are honored that Delta will be the first U.S. carrier to take Indiana nonstop to Europe,” Bob Cortelyou, Delta’s senior vice president-network planning, said in the announcement last September.

MORE: Population, wages drag pace of new home building

Delta offers service from Indianapolis to 13 destinations and 37 peak-day departures, the airline said. With the new service to Paris, customers from across the Hoosier State and the region will have one-stop connections at Paris-Charles de Gaulle to more than 100 destinations in Europe, Africa, Middle East and India.

Delta’s on-board experience between Indianapolis and Paris will be on Boeing 767-300ER aircraft, equipped with 25 fully lie-flat seats in Delta One, 29 seats Delta Comfort+ and 171 seats in the Main Cabin.

MORE: New University of Dayton building: What we know today

Every seat has access to wi-fi, free personal in-flight seat-back entertainment screens as well as power ports. Complimentary meals and beverages will also be provided in all cabins of service.

Delta’s Indianapolis-Paris service will be scheduled to operate as follows:

DL500 Indianapolis (IND) at 6:20 p.m. Paris (CDG) at 8:45 a.m. (next day)

DL501 Paris (CDG) at 1:15 p.m. Indianapolis (IND) at 4:35 p.m.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Study: A trio of Ohio cities job-seekers are trying to escape

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 9:59 AM

The Proctor & Gamble headquarters complex in downtown Cincinnati. According to jobs and recruiting web site Glassdoor, Cincinnati is among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs in other cities. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
The Proctor & Gamble headquarters complex in downtown Cincinnati. According to jobs and recruiting web site Glassdoor, Cincinnati is among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs in other cities. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Three big Ohio cities are among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs elsewhere, according to a list from Glassdoor, a job and recruiting web site.

Cincinnati is No. 9 and Cleveland is No. 10 on that list, according to Glassdoor. Columbus finds itself ranked at No. 6.

A city in Rhode Island led that list of the most workers applying elsewhere for employment, the company said.

MOREPace of new home building in Dayton area slows

“The college town of Providence, R.I. topped the list of cities with the highest percentage (52.2 percent) of candidates in the metro applying for jobs elsewhere,” the site said. “Specifically, this means that more than half of job seekers in Providence are applying to jobs in other areas.”

The percentage of job seekers in Cincinnati applying for jobs in others cities was 36.2 percent, according to Glassdoor. In Cleveland, that percentage was 35.3 percent. Columbus — home of course to Ohio’s biggest university, Ohio State University — the percentage was 41.4 percent.

One of the cities to which job-seekers in Cincinnati were most likely to apply, interestingly, is Dayton, according to the study. 

In fact, among the top 10 job destinations for applicants in Cincinnati is Dayton, the study said, second only to New York City.

MORENew owner promises to bring downtown Dayton building back to life

The top two hoped-for destinations among job seekers are San Francisco, California and New York City, the study claims.

Glassdoor said the information is based on applications on its own web site, based on a sample of more than 668,000 online job applications started on Glassdoor from January 8 to 14 this year, for the 40 largest metro areas in the United States.

You can read more about the study here. 

Trending - Most Read Stories

Population, wages drag pace of home building

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 8:58 AM


            Oberer Homes is developing more than 150 acres in Clearcreek Twp. near Red Lion for more than 70 new homes. The property sits along State Routes 741 and 122. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Oberer Homes is developing more than 150 acres in Clearcreek Twp. near Red Lion for more than 70 new homes. The property sits along State Routes 741 and 122. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Homes are hot again, and values have been creeping back up for years. In some markets, values have even been restored to pre-recession peaks and beyond.

One challenge in the Dayton area, however, has been a relative lack of inventory of available homes, Realtors have told this media outlet for months.

MORE: Will Target next-day delivery come to Dayton?

That squeezed inventory tends to drive prices up, creating a seller’s market and forcing shoppers to move quickly when they find the home that’s right for them.

MORE: Check out this five-bedroom, Washington Twp. home

Compounding the problem has a slowing in the building of new homes.

Here’s what area home builders and market observers have been telling us: READ MORE.

Trending - Most Read Stories