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Amazon launches grocery delivery from Whole Foods in Ohio

Published: Friday, February 09, 2018 @ 8:42 AM
Updated: Friday, March 16, 2018 @ 5:29 PM

Amazon to Start Whole Foods Deliveries in Four Cities The tech giant will offer free, two hour delivery from the supermarket to Prime members in Austin, Cincinnati, Dallas and Virginia Beach. The new deal will go into effect on Thursday. Prime members will be able to place their order via the Amazon website or the Prime Now app. Amazon bought the Whole Foods market chain in June for $13.7 billion.

Amazon is now delivery groceries from Whole Foods in some cities, including West Chester and Cincinnati.

Amazon and Whole Foods Market today announced the introduction of free two-hour delivery of natural and organic products from Whole Foods Market through Prime Now, with plans to expand across the U.S. in 2018.

Customers can enter their zip code on the Prime Now website or app to see if they are in the delivery area, a Whole Foods spokeswoman told this news organization. Residents living in zip codes near West Chester can order food online and get it delivered to their doors.

The Dayton area Whole Foods, located at 1050 Miamisburg Centerville Road, is not delivering currently.

Prime customers in neighborhoods of Austin, Cincinnati, Dallas and Virginia Beach can shop through Prime Now for items including fresh produce, meat and seafood, everyday staples and other locally sourced items from Whole Foods Market.

» TRENDING BUSINESS NEWS: Empty shelves at Whole Foods? Employees dismayed by inventory system

Select alcohol is also available for delivery to customers. Prime members receive two-hour delivery for free and ultra-fast delivery within one hour for $7.99 on orders of $35 or more.

“We’re happy to bring our customers the convenience of free two-hour delivery through Prime Now and access to thousands of natural and organic groceries and locally sourced favorites,” said John Mackey, Whole Foods Market co-founder and CEO.

Delivery from Whole Foods Market through Prime Now is available daily from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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New UD office building: What we know now

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 11:11 AM

The University of Dayton announced plans to build a new facility at 1401 S. Main St. The new office building will house The Dayton Foundation, the Dayton Development Coalition and the Universitys Fitz Center for Leadership in Community.
The University of Dayton announced plans to build a new facility at 1401 S. Main St. The new office building will house The Dayton Foundation, the Dayton Development Coalition and the Universitys Fitz Center for Leadership in Community.

The University of Dayton will soon build another campus building, this one expected to serve as home to the Dayton Development Coalition, the Dayton Foundation and the college’s Fitz Center for Leadership in Community. 

This is not just another campus building, but a new structure in the southern part of the city that has long been ripe for development potential — and has seen plenty of development already.

Here are four things to know about the announcement:

  

1. Location

The to-be-constructed building at 1401 S. Main St. will be located between Emerson’s Helix Innovation Center and Universal 1 Credit Union. It will be 38,000 square feet and will include offices for each organization along with shared meeting spaces, according to UD.

RELATED: UD building new office building on South Main 

The university plans to launch construction this year. Once construction starts, the new facility will take only a year to build, said UD provost Paul Benson.

2. The process is far along

But it’s not quite final yet. The last details are being worked out.

Both the foundation and the development coalition have signed letters of intent to lease space in the new facility, UD said Friday. Both the foundation and the coalition are today located downtown in the Kettering Tower, Dayton’s tallest building.

MORE: Three Ohio cities job-seekers are trying to escape 

The new building will put the coalition within steps of General Electric’s $51 million EPIScenter, which opened in 2013, and Emerson’s $35 million Helix Innovation Center built in 2016.

3. Growing is what UD does

Building and expanding have become UD hallmarks in nearly the past two decades.

 

Land purchases more than a decade ago set the stage for the EPIScenter and the Emerson Helix buildings.

In 2005, UD — then under the leadership of UD President Daniel Curran (today, UD president emeritus) — finalized the purchase of 49 acres of NCR Corp. property for $25 million. The property ran from Brown Street to the Great Miami River.

MORE: Fairgrounds: UD, Premier outline when, where first work could happen

Then, more than four years later, UD purchased 115 acres, including NCR’s former world headquarters at 1700 S. Patterson Blvd. and the 48-acre Old River Park property, for $18 million.

That land today is home to UD’s second biggest building (the former NCR HQ) and is considered the university’s “River Campus.”

By 2009, UD had already invested more than $200 million in new construction and renovation just in the past decade.

4. The former fairgrounds are nearby

Meanwhile, the just-announced building will be close to the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds off South Main, across from Miami Valley Hospital.

UD and Premier Health jointly own those fairgrounds — and the future awaits that property.

The 38-acre fairgrounds redevelopment is one of the most anticipated projects in recent Dayton history. Though Premier and UD have not made a final decision for the fairgrounds, they’ve proposed a number of ideas that include housing, retail and green space.

Planning NEXT, the master planning contracted to the project, in January unveiled the early vision for the fairgrounds, which calls for the first phase of development to have about 245 units of housing, 225,000 square feet of office, 60,000 square feet of retail and four acres of urban agriculture.

Study: A trio of Ohio cities job-seekers are trying to escape

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 9:59 AM

The Proctor & Gamble headquarters complex in downtown Cincinnati. According to jobs and recruiting web site Glassdoor, Cincinnati is among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs in other cities. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
The Proctor & Gamble headquarters complex in downtown Cincinnati. According to jobs and recruiting web site Glassdoor, Cincinnati is among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs in other cities. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Three big Ohio cities are among the top 10 cities with the most workers seeking to move to jobs elsewhere, according to a list from Glassdoor, a job and recruiting web site.

Cincinnati is No. 9 and Cleveland is No. 10 on that list, according to Glassdoor. Columbus finds itself ranked at No. 6.

A city in Rhode Island led that list of the most workers applying elsewhere for employment, the company said.

MOREPace of new home building in Dayton area slows

“The college town of Providence, R.I. topped the list of cities with the highest percentage (52.2 percent) of candidates in the metro applying for jobs elsewhere,” the site said. “Specifically, this means that more than half of job seekers in Providence are applying to jobs in other areas.”

The percentage of job seekers in Cincinnati applying for jobs in others cities was 36.2 percent, according to Glassdoor. In Cleveland, that percentage was 35.3 percent. Columbus — home of course to Ohio’s biggest university, Ohio State University — the percentage was 41.4 percent.

One of the cities to which job-seekers in Cincinnati were most likely to apply, interestingly, is Dayton, according to the study. 

In fact, among the top 10 job destinations for applicants in Cincinnati is Dayton, the study said, second only to New York City.

MORENew owner promises to bring downtown Dayton building back to life

The top two hoped-for destinations among job seekers are San Francisco, California and New York City, the study claims.

Glassdoor said the information is based on applications on its own web site, based on a sample of more than 668,000 online job applications started on Glassdoor from January 8 to 14 this year, for the 40 largest metro areas in the United States.

You can read more about the study here. 

Population, wages drag pace of home building

Published: Sunday, May 20, 2018 @ 8:58 AM


            Oberer Homes is developing more than 150 acres in Clearcreek Twp. near Red Lion for more than 70 new homes. The property sits along State Routes 741 and 122. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Oberer Homes is developing more than 150 acres in Clearcreek Twp. near Red Lion for more than 70 new homes. The property sits along State Routes 741 and 122. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Homes are hot again, and values have been creeping back up for years. In some markets, values have even been restored to pre-recession peaks and beyond.

One challenge in the Dayton area, however, has been a relative lack of inventory of available homes, Realtors have told this media outlet for months.

MORE: Will Target next-day delivery come to Dayton?

That squeezed inventory tends to drive prices up, creating a seller’s market and forcing shoppers to move quickly when they find the home that’s right for them.

MORE: Check out this five-bedroom, Washington Twp. home

Compounding the problem has a slowing in the building of new homes.

Here’s what area home builders and market observers have been telling us: READ MORE.

Target next-day delivery may be coming

Published: Thursday, May 17, 2018 @ 1:01 PM

AP photo/FILE
AP photo/FILE

A next-day delivery service from Target isn’t available in Dayton yet -- but “stay tuned,” Target is saying.

The retail company announced that it is offering “Target Restock,” a next-day delivery service of household goods, available “coast to coast,” the company said.

But a cursory search on the Target Restock web site showed that the service isn’t yet available in Dayton-area ZIP codes yet. 

That may change in time, the company said. 

“Apologies for the disappointment, but stay tuned,” the company’s @AskTarget Twitter account said Thursday. “Target Restock will continue to launch in several markets throughout 2018.”

The deliveries are free for all Target REDcard purchases, and cost $2.99 for other orders. There is no membership fee, the company said.

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The service will reach “more than 75 percent” of the U.S. population, Target said.

But not the Dayton area, at least not yet. A quick search at the Restock site Thursday morning of Dayton-area ZIP codes show that the service doesn’t appear to be available in this area, at least for the moment. 

Search attempts for ZIP codes linked to suburbs south and east of Dayton show that the service isn’t yet available in those areas either.

Customers may order household goods online by 7 p.m., Monday through Friday and have “Restock boxes” delivered the next day.

“Target Restock is another way we’re making life easier for our busy, budget-conscious guests,” Dawn Block, Target’s senior vice president of digital, said in an announcement. “Our guests love the speed and convenience of the service. And now that Target Restock is an even better value, we think the service will become increasingly popular.”

Orders can be up to 45 pounds, monitored by an online tracker, the company said.