Kirstie Zontini: Hurricane season off to quick start

Published: Monday, June 26, 2017 @ 10:45 AM


            More than one million people in Ohio lost power during a wind storm in September 2009 that was a leftover of Hurricane Ike. The storm hit Ohio and the northern Miami Valley hard. FILE
More than one million people in Ohio lost power during a wind storm in September 2009 that was a leftover of Hurricane Ike. The storm hit Ohio and the northern Miami Valley hard. FILE

By Kirstie Zontini

Tropical Storm Cindy brought heavy rain and strong winds to the central Gulf coast last week and was the third named storm of the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Before Cindy was Tropical Storm Bret and Tropical Storm Arlene.

The National Hurricane Center, part of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, tracks these storms. It is an organization with the purpose of saving lives, property and improving economic efficiency when dealing with tropical cyclones. It’s the agency that issues watches, warnings, forecasts then post analysis of tropical development for the United States similar to what local National Weather Service offices do for other types of weather hazards.

Hurricane season began in June and there have already been two named storms this month. The National Hurricane Center’s Hurricane Season Outlook for this year is predicting an above- normal or near-normal hurricane season. According to the NHC, there is a high probability of 11 to 17 named storms this year, of those storms, five to nine could become hurricanes, and two to four could become major hurricanes.

Starting this year, the National Hurricane Center has also updated some of their weather products. Storm surge from tropical development like hurricanes can be deadly and pose one of the biggest threats to property. This year, Storm Surge Watches/Warnings can be issued. A Storm Surge Watch is, “the possibility of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area, generally within 48 hours.” A Storm Surge Warning is, “the danger of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area, generally within 36 hours.” Both can help residents and local agencies prepare for this threat in the event of a tropical cyclone.

Another update is watches, warnings and advisories issued for “potential” tropical cyclones. This was seen during the development of Tropical Storm Cindy which threatened land. Advancements in forecasting has allowed the NHC to issue Tropical Storm Watches and Warnings before a disturbance takes on the complete characteristics of a tropical cyclone. Potential tropical cyclones will follow a numerical order. We already had three potential tropical cyclones so the next one will be called Potential Tropical Cyclone Four.

According to the National Hurricane Center, they will also issue experimental Time of Arrival of Tropical Storm Force Winds graphics. These forecasts can help with preparations for coastal communities while a tropical cyclone is developing or is already being tracked by looking closer at the timing of strong winds.

We don’t often get impacts from hurricanes or tropical storms in the Miami Valley but with hurricane season running through November, your Storm Center 7 team will keep you updated on the latest tropical development.

Kirstie Zontini is a Storm Center 7 meteorologist. Eric Elwell, Storm Center 7 Chief Meterologist will return.

Rain returns to start the workweek

Published: Saturday, October 21, 2017 @ 5:38 AM
Updated: Saturday, October 21, 2017 @ 5:40 PM

Saturday evening weather update with Meteorologist Brett Collar

A few lingering clouds are possible overnight, but for the most part we should be seeing more clearing, Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Brett Collar said. Temperatures will be in the lower to middle 50s overnight.

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Dry conditions this weekend
  • Rain moves in Monday
  • Cooler Tuesday and Wednesday

>>Fall colors near peak

5-Day Temperature Trend(Graphic by Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Brett Collar)

DETAILED FORECAST

Sunday: A mix of sun and clouds is expected. Highs will be in the middle 70s.

Monday: Showers move in, some of which could be heavy at times. The best chance to see the steady and possibly heavy rain will be in the afternoon and evening hours. While the chance for storms isn’t all that high, we can’t rule out a rumble of thunder or two. Highs will be in the middle to upper 60s.

Tuesday: A few lingering showers are possible under mostly cloudy skies. Highs will be in the middle 50s.

Wednesday: A cool day is on tap. Highs will be in the lower 50s and while the chance for rain is small, a couple of passing showers can’t be ruled out.

Thursday: We should dry out under partly cloudy skies. Highs will be in the upper 50s.

Clear skies for meteor shower this weekend

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 5:53 AM
Updated: Saturday, October 21, 2017 @ 3:20 AM

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini has a look at how cool we get and how active the meteor shower will be this weekend.

After finding Venus and Mars early in the week, another special treat awaits you in the early morning sky this weekend! 

>> Advice for best viewing of meteor shower

The Orionid meteor shower will put on a good show Friday night into Saturday morning, and Saturday night into Sunday morning.

Debris from Haley's comet will hit Earth's atmosphere. The Orionid shower gets its name because the meteors look like they are coming  from the constellation Orion. This year, 10 to 30 meteors per hour are possible. 

>> Warming trend continues; lower temps arrive next week

This weekend skies will cooperate for great viewing of the Orionid meteor shower!

Temperatures will drop into the middle 50s overnight Saturday into Sunday. The moon will set around 8:14 p.m. so skies will remain dark. Some high clouds will be out there Saturday night, but overall it will still be a good night to view.

>> #SkyWitness7

Get outside and grab a blanket, find a dark spot with a good view of the sky and let your eyes adjust to the darkness. If you capture any photos share them using the hashtag #SkyWitness7!

Cooler, fall temperatures start to approach Miami Valley 

Published: Friday, October 20, 2017 @ 3:39 AM
Updated: Friday, October 20, 2017 @ 11:30 AM

Warm temperatures are expected this weekend, with rain returning next week in the Dayton area.

It stays quiet and cool overnight with lows near 50 degrees, Storm Center 7 Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs said.

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Clear and cool overnight
  • Warmer than normal weekend
  • Showers, lower temps next week

>> When to see Orionid meteor shower this weekend

5 Day Forecast with Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs

DETAILED FORECAST

Saturday: Plenty of sunshine starts the weekend. Highs will push into the upper 70s, more than 10 degrees above normal. Mostly sunny skies expected through the day.

>> Fall colors near peak 

Yard Work Forecast(Graphic by Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Mcall Vrydaghs)

Sunday: Sun will give way to clouds, but it stays dry. It will be another warm day with highs in the middle to upper 70s. More clouds and the chance for showers develop late Sunday night.

>> 5-Day Forecast

(Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini)

Monday: It will be cloudy ith showers likely. These showers could become steady, and perhaps heavy at times. It will be cooler with highs in the upper 60s.

Tuesday: A breezy and cool day is expected with a few passing showers possible. Much cooler air will settle into the Miami Valley. Highs only reach into the upper 50s.

>> WHIO Doppler 7 HD Radar

Wednesday: A cold start to what will be a cooler than normal day. Morning temperatures near the upper 30s will only climb to the lower 50s for highs. Lots of clouds will be around with the chance of a few passing showers.

>> WHIO Weather App                                              

Tips for viewing a meteor shower

Published: Friday, October 20, 2017 @ 7:55 AM

Here's what you need to know before you head outside.

Meteor showers are great events to enjoy at any age. When the sky cooperates, the bright show can keep you entertained for hours.

RELATED: Clear skies for meteor shower this weekend 

Viewing a meteor shower when the skies are clear and dark will set you up for success. Little or no moonlight means the meteors will be easier to see. Head outside after midnight and before dawn. You'll want to find a dark spot away from city lights and let your eyes adjust to the darkness.

RELATED: SkyWitness 7 

Make sure you are prepared for the forecast and dress warmly if you need to. You want to grab a sleeping bag or lawn chair and dedicate at least 30 minutes to looking across the night sky. You won't need a telescope or binoculars because they will limit how much sky is visible to you. The wider the view, the better. Remember to stay patient and enjoy! 

For a calendar of meteor showers throughout the year visit http://www.skywitness7.com