How you can help with Sandy

Published: Wednesday, October 31, 2012 @ 4:04 PM
Updated: Wednesday, October 31, 2012 @ 4:04 PM


            This aerial photo shows destroyed houses left in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
This aerial photo shows destroyed houses left in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

There are many ways that you can help with disaster relief in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Below are several ways to donate to the relief effort:


The American Red Cross

Donate by Phone or Mail

  • Call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767), or print a donation form that can be mailed to the Red Cross.
  • 1-800-257-7575 (Español)
  • 1-800-220-4095 (TDD)

North American Mission Board Disaster Relief:

  • Online donation: Click here
  • Phone—Call-1-866-407-NAMB (6262)
  • Mail—Checks may be mailed to NAMB, P.O. Box 116543, Atlanta, GA 30368-6543. Designate checks for "Disaster Relief." 

Salvation Army:

Habitat for Humanity:

The United Way:

  • Online donation: Click here
  • A $10 donation can be made by texting the word RECOVERY to 52000.

Send a text to help

Verizon Wireless, AT&T customers can make a $10 donation by texting the numbers listed below:

  • REDCROSS to 90999 to support the American Red Cross
  • STORM to 80888 to give to the Salvation Army
  • HUMANE to 80888 for the American Humane Association

T-Mobile customers can make donations to the American Red Cross via their mobile phone, with donations charged to your T-Mobile phone bill.

  • Text the keyword DONATE to 90999 to give $25
  • Text the keyword REDCROSS to 90999 to give $10

 

 

Warming trend continues; lower temps arrive next week

Published: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 7:32 PM

A slow warm-up is getting underway across the Miami Valley which will bring temperatures back up nearly 10 degrees above normal by this weekend. But a surge of very chilly air is brewing up in Canada, and may be getting set to head south. Chief meteorologist Eric Elwell explains when this big change will likely occur.

A slow warming trend is underway with above-average temperatures expected Wednesday.

Temperatures of 70 degrees will return through the weekend as a massive area of high pressure slowly pushes across the eastern half off the country, Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell said.

However, a major pattern shift is underway in northwestern Canada, where colder air is building. 

This colder air is forecast by most of the long-range models to begin heading southward into the northern U.S. later this weekend.

>>Science world ignores politics, preps for lunar space station

The chilliest air of the season could cross the Miami Valley by the middle of next week with current models predicting our first frost by late next week.

Temperatures may not climb out of the lower 50s next week, with some models suggesting snow near the Great Lakes by Wednesday night.

Although it’s too early to know whether the precipitation will materialize, Elwell said to enjoy the upcoming weekend warmth while it lasts Because big changes could come next week.

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Why is the sun red, the sky yellow in London? 

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 5:44 PM

The Reason For The Red Sun And Yellow Skies In London

An eerie weather phenomenon across parts of the United Kingdom is turning the skies an anemic yellow color and making the sun appear blood red.

>> Read more trending news

The anomaly is not the beginning of the end of days or a sign of the apocalypse, scientists said. Instead, it’s directly related to Hurricane Ophelia, which is whipping through the region.

The storm’s tropical air dragged in dust from the Sahara Desert and air pollution from wildfires in Spain and Portugal as it moved north through the Atlantic, creating the strange spectacle, the BBC reported.

The sky in France's Brittany region also turned yellow on Monday, Oct. 16,2017 as nearby Hurricane Ophelia brought a mix of sand from the Sahara and particles from Spain and Portugal's forest fires over the region. (David Vincent/AP)

“The dust gets picked up into the air and goes high up into the atmosphere, and that dust has been dragged high up in the atmosphere above the UK,” BBC weatherman Simon King said, according to the Express.

The blood-red sun Monday morning across the region is a result of the same weather phenomenon creating the yellow skies, according to the U.K.’s  Meteorological Office or Met Office.

“The same southerly winds that have brought us the current warmth have also drawn dust from the Sahara to our latitudes and the dust scatters the blue light from the sun letting more red light through much as at sunrise or sunset,” Met officials said on the agency’s website.

>> Related: Yellowstone supervolcano could erupt much sooner than predicted, study reveals

Social media users in London chronicled the spectacle on Twitter.

WPAFB Tuesday Weather: Patchy frost, chilly temps to start the day 

Published: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 12:03 AM

WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE—After starting the day with some patchy frost and chilly temperatures, seasonably mild weather is expected this afternoon with plenty of sunshine, said Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell. 

RELATED: Dayton Interactive Radar - WHIO Doppler 7 

Highs will reach into the middle 60s. Skies will remain clear tonight as temperatures fall back into the 40s but stay slightly warmer than last night. 

RELATED: 5-Day Forecast

The slow warming trend will continue through the week and into the upcoming weekend, with highs reaching back into the lower 70s by Thursday. The weather will remain dry through at least Saturday and likely through the entire weekend before a storm system arrives early next week.

Science world ignores politics, preps for lunar space station

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 2:52 PM

NASA and other space agencies around the world are planning to build an outpost near the moon.
Zak GHM
NASA and other space agencies around the world are planning to build an outpost near the moon.(Zak GHM)

Working in the news business, it is easy to get distracted by the unsettling chaos of the day and the uneasy political climate.

»MORE: What to know about sky events

Most days, I tune out a lot of the bad news and try to focus on the weather and what good is happening. Yes, there are some good things. Despite our political discourse and the unnecessary politicization of science, the science community continues to work together for a better and brighter world with new, exciting adventures for exploration and study. This gives me great optimism for the future.

International Space Station flyover Kettering

One great example is the announcement of a new multi-national quest to build a lunar space station. Late last month, the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos announced they would join a NASA-led effort to build an international human outpost near the moon. The Russians will now join the European Space Agency (ESA), Japanese (JAXA) and Canadian space agencies (CSA) who are already working with NASA, on a plan to construct a modular habitat to be known as Deep-Space Gateway. The habitat will be built in orbit around the moon, and will become a primary destination for astronauts, extending the presence of humans beyond earth’s orbit for the first time since 1972 when Apollo missions ended.

»WEATHER: Get the latest Storm Center 7 forecast

The Deep-Space Gateway, if funded, is expected to be launched on NASA’s giant SLS rocket and serviced by the crews of NASA’s new Orion spacecraft. Once operational, the outpost is expected to pave the way for mission to Mars in the 2030s with the construction of a Deep Space Transport. It is also possible that Deep-Space Gateway will allow for future missions to the moon’s surface and perhaps even a lunar habitat. While some may think that such an undertaking could be a waste of money, it is important to realize the amazing discoveries that occur in space that significantly advance technology and research right here on earth. You can thank the space program for inventions like hand-held vacuum cleaners, breathing apparatus for firefighters, lasers that assist with heart surgery, satellite television, lightning detection systems and so much more.

The International Space Station (ISS) is the primary destination for astronauts and cosmonauts. The ISS is supported by NASA, Roscosmos, JAXA, ESA, and CSA. The ownership and use of the space station is established by intergovernmental treaties and agreements. Interestingly, the station is divided into two sections, the Russian Orbital Segment (ROS) and the United States Orbital Segment (USOS), which is shared by many nations. Currently, the American portion of ISS is being funded until 2024.

The lunar station, Deep-Space Gateway is expected to go under construction in the mid-2020s according to Roscosmos with both US and Russian rockets being used to launch the modules into space.

Now - if we could just get political leaders across the world to learn from the scientific community - and look beyond petty differences, greed and infighting. Working together with other nations can only help the advancement of science and technology, and perhaps someday, develop cures to diseases and famine. Despite our differences and beliefs, we are and will always be a tiny speck of something much, much bigger. The only question is - what will our contribution be?

Eric Elwell is WHIO StormCenter 7 Chief Meteorologist. Contact him at eric.elwell@coxinc.com or follow him on Facebook and Twitter.