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Celebration Worship Ministries,

Freeze warning expanded for more areas

Updated: Saturday, April 20, 2013 @ 9:26 PM
Published: Saturday, April 20, 2013 @ 4:06 PM
By: Breaking News Staff - www.whiotv.com

The freeze warning has been expanded to include everyone for midnight Saturday night through 10:00 a.m. Sunday morning.

Decreasing clouds and diminishing winds through Saturday evening says Storm Center 7 Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs. If you’re out for Saturday night plans, you will definitely need the jacket. We will fall below freezing overnight, and with light winds it’s very likely to see frost by Sunday morning. It would be a good idea to cover or bring in any vegetation to keep them from the damaging cold.

Sunday will be even colder to start than we saw Saturday, but will look and feel a lot better Sunday afternoon. More sunshine and highs expected in the mid 50s. This is still close to 10 degrees below normal.

More clouds expected on Monday, but milder with a high reaching into the mid 60s.

Increasing clouds on Tuesday with highs in the upper 60s. We could see some showers in spots west during Tuesday evening, but most will not see any until later Tuesday night. We shouldn’t rule out a few rumbles of thunder.

Wednesday morning showers taper off, then clouds break for a bit of late day sun. Cooler again in the low to mid 50s.

Partly cloudy and still cool on Thursday. Highs in the mid to upper 50s. Chance of a few late day showers.

Storm prep checklist for outside the home

Updated: Thursday, October 06, 2016 @ 1:25 PM
Published: Tuesday, May 10, 2016 @ 2:53 PM
By: www.prod.cmgdefault.com


            Storm prep checklist for outside the home
Get Ahead of the Storm - 5 Severe Weather Hacks

WHEN THE STORM THREATENS:

Refill special medications.

Get cash (ATMs may not work for days after). Don’t charge credit cards to the limit; you might need extra cash after the storm.

Get supplies. Follow instructions in this guide for food and water.

Don’t fill gasoline cans until right before the storm; they are a fire hazard.

Fill vehicle fuel tank. Gas stations could run out and some will not have power to run pumps. Check your car’s battery, water, oil. Make sure you have a spare tire and buy aerosol kits that fix and inflate flats.

Check fire extinguishers.

If you own a boat, make necessary preparations.

Prepare your pool. Don’t drain it.

If you own a plane, have it flown out or secured.

WHEN THE STORM IS APPROACHING:

Get shutters, storm panels or plywood in place on windows. If you haven’t installed sockets, attach with wood screws; they’re better than nails and do less damage.

Don’t tape windows; tape can create daggers of glass and in the heat can later bake onto panes.

Remove swings and tarps from swing sets. Tie down anything you can’t bring in. Check for loose rain gutters, moldings.

Move grills, patio furniture and potted plants into your house or garage.

If you do any last-minute pruning, take clippings inside so they don’t become hazards in the wind.

Disconnect and remove satellite dish or antenna from your roof.

Check your mailbox. If it’s loose, secure or remove it.

Remove roof turbines and cap holes with screw-on caps. Unsecured turbines can fly off and create a large hole for rain to pour through.

Prepare patio screening. It usually is built to sustain tropical-force winds, but with higher winds, it can separate from the frame. Officials recommend you remove a 6-foot panel on each side to let wind pass through. Pull out the tubing that holds screening in frame to remove screen.

Secure and brace external doors, especially the garage door and double doors.

Move vehicles out of flood-prone areas and into garages if possible. If not, park cars away from trees and close to homes or buildings.

Don’t turn off your natural gas at the main meter. Only emergency or utility people should do that.

Landscapes: Trees and yard

Updated: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 @ 10:44 AM
Published: Friday, May 27, 2016 @ 9:02 PM
By: www.prod.cmgdefault.com

Trees should be trimmed by early June, before storms threaten. Many municipalities have “amnesty” weeks before storm season, when you can deposit more than the allowable limit of yard debris. Call municipalities for more information.

Call a professional. Trees trimmed by a professional arborist are far less likely to go down in a storm.

Thinning a tree allows wind to blow through its canopy, offering less wind resistance in a storm. Prune young trees to create a single leader, which will grow into a strong trunk.

To minimize damage to a mature tree, eliminate weak branches and reduce the length of limbs at a tree’s sides. Don’t remove interior branches, as this can make a tree unbalanced.

Hatracked trees become sails. Removing a tree’s canopy encourages bushy growth, which makes a tree top heavy and wind-resistant. Some hatracked trees “sailed” directly to the ground. Hatracking is illegal.

‘Lifted’ trees mean broken branches. “Lifting” is a common practice where the lower branches are removed to provide clearance underneath. Lifting contributes to branch breakage and makes the tree top heavy.

Don’t wait until the storm is threatening to prune. If the trash pickup doesn’t get to your curb before the storm strikes, you’ve created a pile of potential missiles.

Coconuts behave like cannonballs in high winds. Remove them well before a storm hits. If trees are too tall for you to reach, hire a tree trimmer.

  • More hurricane tree protection tips

    Tips for your yard

    Take in hanging pots and baskets. Secure or take in pots from shadehouses.
  • Secure young trees with additional stakes.

    Don’t remove fruit. If you put it in a trash pile and the pile isn’t picked up, the fruit may fly around in the wind.

    Tree-dwelling bromeliads, staghorn ferns and orchids can be secured with fishing line.

    Take in or tie up any piles of yard or construction debris.

    Take in all garden furniture, grills, tiki torches and other outdoor items. (Do not sink furniture in swimming pool.)

    Consider removing gates and trellises.

    Palms, native trees fared best through 3 hurricanes

    In high wind, palms will bend but not always break. Since they originated in the tropics and subtropics, their supple trunks have adapted to hurricanes.

    Plant palms in clumps around the edge of your garden (not near the house) to block the wind and protect more fragile plants inside. Although fronds will be damaged in a storm, most of these palms will recover.

    Ficus trees come down easily in storms

    Ficus trees are not meant for residential yards. They grow to 70 feet with a massive span of shallow roots, and come down easily in high winds.

    If you already have a ficus, have it professionally trimmed before hurricane season begins. (If you have Australian pine and ficus in your yard, consider removing them.)

    Stake small trees as a storm approaches with stakes driven at least 8 inches into the ground.

    Trim large masses of vines so they don’t pull down fences.

    Lay arches and trellises on the ground and anchor with rope.

    Fast-growing, brittle trees should never be planted in hurricane country, no matter how quickly you need shade.

    STRONG TREES

    Gumbo limbo
    Cocoplum
    Cypress
    Dahoon holly
    Geiger tree
    Buttonwood
    Jamaica caper
    Mastic
    Ironwood
    Live oak
    Sand oak
    Red bay
    Red maple
    Cypress
    Sea grape
    Stopper
    Strangler fig

    BRITTLE TREES
    (Consider removing these trees from your yard.)

    Australian pine
    Earleaf acacia
    Ficus (ficus benjamina, weeping fig)
    Bishopwood (Bischofia)
    Carrotwood
    Hong Kong orchid
    Tabebuia
    Laurel oak
    Melaleuca
    Schefflera
    Black olive
    Jacaranda
    Java plum
    Norfolk Island pine
    Royal poinciana
    Silk oak

    STORM-SAFE PALMS

    Cabbage palm (sabal palm)
    Canary Island date palm
    Christmas palm (adonidia)
    Coconut palm
    Florida thatch palm
    Foxtail palm
    Robellini palm (Pygmy date palm)
    Royal palm
    Majesty palm
    Paurotis palm
    Thatch palms

    Note: Queen palms are the exception. They have a very low wind tolerance.

    Atlantic hurricane names

    Updated: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 @ 9:17 AM
    Published: Thursday, May 19, 2016 @ 4:59 PM
    By: www.prod.cmgdefault.com



    When the the winds from these storms reach 39 mph (34 kts), the cyclones are given names. Years ago, an international committee developed names for Atlantic cyclones. In 1979 a six year rotating list of Atlantic storm names was adopted — alternating between male and female hurricane names. Storm names are used to facilitate geographic referencing, for warning services, for legal issues, and to reduce confusion when two or more tropical cyclones occur at the same time. Through a vote of the World Meteorological Organization Region IV Subcommittee, Atlantic cyclone names are retired usually when hurricanes result in substantial damage or death or for other special circumstances. The names assigned for the period between 2016 and 2020 are shown below.
    Names for Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones

    20162017201820192020

    Alex
    Bonnie
    Colin
    Danielle
    Earl
    Fiona
    Gaston
    Hermine
    Ian
    Julia
    Karl
    Lisa
    Matthew
    Nicole
    Otto
    Paula
    Richard
    Shary
    Tobias
    Virginie
    Walter
    Arlene
    Bret
    Cindy
    Don
    Emily
    Franklin
    Gert
    Harvey
    Irma
    Jose
    Katia
    Lee
    Maria
    Nate
    Ophelia
    Philippe
    Rina
    Sean
    Tammy
    Vince
    Whitney
    Alberto
    Beryl
    Chris
    Debby
    Ernesto
    Florence
    Gordon
    Helene
    Isaac
    Joyce
    Kirk
    Leslie
    Michael
    Nadine
    Oscar
    Patty
    Rafael
    Sara
    Tony
    Valerie
    William
    Andrea
    Barry
    Chantal
    Dorian
    Erin
    Fernand
    Gabrielle
    Humberto
    Imelda
    Jerry
    Karen
    Lorenzo
    Melissa
    Nestor
    Olga
    Pablo
    Rebekah
    Sebastien
    Tanya
    Van
    Wendy
    Arthur
    Bertha
    Cristobal
    Dolly
    Edouard
    Fay
    Gonzalo
    Hanna
    Isaias
    Josephine
    Kyle
    Laura
    Marco
    Nana
    Omar
    Paulette
    Rene
    Sally
    Teddy
    Vicky
    Wilfred

    Grills are convenient, but can be dangerous

    Updated: Saturday, September 24, 2016 @ 2:02 PM
    Published: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 @ 10:35 PM
    By: www.prod.cmgdefault.com

    When the power goes out, you may be cooking on a charcoal, propane or natural gas grill, or a hibachi.

    Never leave grill unattended. Keep children away! Don’t grill near leaves, wood or other flammable objects.

    CHARCOAL GRILLS

    Safety first! Grills can kill. Charcoal emits carbon monoxide. It’s odorless and colorless and deadly. Grills emit it even if the lid is on, and they can emit it even if coals appear completely out. After Hurricane Wilma in 2005, a mother in a family of three died from carbon monoxide poisoning after a smoldering grill was left in a kitchen.

    Grill food in a well-ventilated area. NEVER bring a grill inside a home, camper or tent. Do NOT grill in a garage, carport or shed.

    Douse coals with water, stir and douse again. They are out when they are cool to the touch.

    Stock up early. Store in a dry area, away from flame.

    PROPANE GRILLS

    Fill your propane tanks now! Lines will be long once the storm approaches. If you have a big tank, have it filled regularly during the season. If you use small tanks, have two or even three full ones on hand.

    When refilling, have supplier check for dents, damage, rust or leaks. At home, check hoses for leaks, kinks or deterioration.

    If tank appears damaged after a storm, don’t use it.

    Keep propane tanks outside the home, but secure them so they don’t become missiles during the storm.

    Use and store propane cylinders outdoors in an upright position after the storm. Do not store spare tanks close to a hot grill.

    Don’t tamper with supply lines or permanent connections.

    Keep grill lid open until you’re sure it’s lit.

    Always make sure valves and dials are shut tight on both grill and tank. Escaping propane fumes, easy to detect by their strong odor, are deadly to breathe in quantity and can explode. If you smell gas, clear the area and seek help.

    Never smoke around propane!