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Country Concert Weather Forecast: Strong storms, rain making soggy conditions, concert still on schedule 

Published: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 @ 7:51 AM
Updated: Friday, July 07, 2017 @ 2:06 PM

Storm moving into Ft. Loramie

Despite strong storms Country Concert 2017 is still starting their Friday night schedule on time

A cold front moved through Shelby County drenching Country Concert goers in Fort Loramie.  

Rain, storms causing soggy conditions at Country Concert in Fort Loramie, Shelby County. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO Jan Seipel

GUIDE: All you need to know about the region’s biggest, craziest country music tradition

Showers and storms will be approaching the northern Miami Valley around lunch. Active weather expected from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Country concert rain

RELATED: WHIO Interactive Radar 

Friday will be hot and muggy for the afternoon though and Fort Loramie will likely hit the middle 80s. Strong to damaging winds, large hail and minor flooding will be the main threats. Scattered storms will impact shows early in the day and some later ones like Old Dominion, but will be gone when Jake Owen who takes the stage at 10 p.m. that night. We will cool off to around 60 Friday night. 

RELATED: County-by-County Forecasts 

Graphic by Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini

Saturday looks the be the best day of the concert by far. The cold front that passes Friday will bring a change to the air. It won’t be muggy and temperatures will reach the upper 70s for Country Concert. Plenty of sunshine expected for the afternoon so make sure you have sunscreen. Shows like Dan & Shay and Florida Georgia Line will have dry forecasts when they take the stage. 

Graphic by Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini

Don't forget to turn on your push alerts on your WHIO Weather App to get any watches and warnings. You can also turn on "lightning detection" to be informed when storms are near you. Since you can add a location to the app, it will be helpful to make sure you have Fort Loramie set. 

 

Graphic by Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini

Snow, strong winds to make for hazardous travel Tuesday

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 3:48 AM
Updated: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 11:52 PM

Light accumulations, windy and cold conditions expected.

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

     
  • Increasing clouds, snow showers develop late tonight
  • Snow squalls, strong winds Tuesday
  • Falling temperatures, bitter wind chills into midweek

>> WHIO Doppler 7 HD Interactive Radar

DETAILED FORECAST

This evening: Increasing clouds and chilly. temperatures hovering in the 30s.

Tonight: Snow showers developing late with gusty winds developing. Snow accumulation by morning up to a half-inch. Temperatures dropping into the upper 20s.

>> County-by-County Weather 

>> Winter Weather Awareness: What to have in your car kit

Tuesday: Snow showers and squalls likely, especially early in the day. Expect rapidly changing visibility with near white-out conditions possible where snow squalls occur. Total snow accumulations of around an inch are expected with higher amounts, up to 3 inches possible where snow squalls occur.

 

Higher accumulations will generally be across the northwestern Miami Valley. It will be windy and cold with temperatures falling through the 20s. Wind chills will fall into the single digits by evening as snow tapers.

RELATED: Snow squalls could cause white-out conditions Tuesday

>> Winter weather traffic information

>> What are the chances for a White Christmas?

Wednesday: Expect a mix of sun and clouds during the day with increasing clouds late. Scattered snow showers will develop in the afternoon and continue into the evening. Some accumulation is possible, which could create hazardous travel for the evening commute. Highs will only reach into the middle 20s with wind chills in the teens.

(Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini)

Thursday: Expect lingering clouds and chilly temperatures. Highs will be near 30 degrees.

Friday: Expect a mix of sun and clouds. A few flurries or snow showers will be possible. Highs will be near 30 degrees.

Saturday: Temperatures will moderate with a bit more sunshine expected to start the weekend. Highs will rebound to near 40 degrees. 

>> Winter Weather Awareness: How does salt help melt ice on roads?

>> YOU NEED THIS: WHIO Weather App

WPAFB Tuesday Weather: Lake effect to bring snow showers, visibility possibly affected

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 12:21 AM

WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE—Snow showers and snow squalls will be an issue across the Miami Valley today thanks to lake effect snow bands, according to Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell.

RELATED: Dayton Interactive Radar - WHIO Doppler 7

Snow showers will be likely through the first half of the day and gradually taper off toward evening. While snow accumulation will generally be 1” or less, the snow may be briefly heavy. With strong wind gusts up over 30mph at times, visibility may change and drop rapidly.

RELATED: County-by-County Weather 

Temperatures will also be dropping through the 20s during the day with wind chills falling into the single digits by morning. After a brief break in the snow showers Tuesday night into early Wednesday, more snow will be around for the Wednesday evening commute.

Elwell: Alberta Clippers to bring frigid winds this winter

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 3:18 PM

Alberta Clippers are defined as very fast moving low-pressure systems, usually with low in moisture content, originating in Alberta in the lee of the Canadian Rockies, and then travel southeastward. CONTRIBUTED
Alberta Clippers are defined as very fast moving low-pressure systems, usually with low in moisture content, originating in Alberta in the lee of the Canadian Rockies, and then travel southeastward. CONTRIBUTED

What is typically born in Alberta, Canada, and tends to love La Nina winters? An Alberta Clipper, of course. 

It’s one of the most significant synoptic-scale winter weather phenomena affecting central North America and the Great Lakes.

STORM CENTER 7: Get the latest forecast

We had one bring us snow last weekend, and we have another one crossing the Great Lakes Tuesday. They occur most frequently during December and January and substantially less during October and March. 

Alberta Clippers are defined as very fast moving low-pressure systems, usually with low in moisture content, originating in Alberta in the lee of the Canadian Rockies, and then travel southeastward.

Because clipper systems develop and track usually far away from large moisture sources, they typically do not produce a lot of precipitation. They also tend to move very quickly, sometimes as fast as 40 miles per hour. 

Clippers are most known for producing strong, frigid winds, and the strongest ones can blast a region with 30 to 50 mph gusts or stronger.

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With freshly fallen snow, clippers can create blizzard-like conditions. With the low moisture content, these systems usually only produce a few inches of snow at most. This can vary, though, depending on how much moisture the clipper can bring with it and how cold the air is. The colder the temperature, the higher the liquid to snow ratio will be. Basically, if it is quite cold, snowflakes can “fluff up” more, leading to higher accumulations. 

Because we are likely entering a La Nina winter, it is likely that much of the snowfall we see this coming season will be from Alberta Clippers. Alberta Clippers love La Nina years. 

La Nina means the Jet Stream or storm track usually dives south across the Great Lakes. That can often mean areas surrounding the lakes often see a white Christmas.

The Great Lakes southern and eastern shores often receive enhanced snowfall from Clippers during the winter months from lake enhancement. Lake-effect snow substantially increases snowfall totals. 

Also, if conditions are favorable, an Alberta Clipper can rapidly intensify off the East Coast. Once the storm taps the relatively warm moist air over the Atlantic Ocean, the storm sometimes spreads heavy snow over New England and Southeastern Canada. Such a system appears to be brewing for this region this week. 

While not quite as common, there are two variations of Alberta Clippers. Manitoba Maulers and Saskatchewan Screamers are the names given to the other two. These systems are still often referred to as Clippers. The main difference between the three is from which Canadian province they begin their southward track. 

MORE: Snow squalls could impact drivers Tuesday

While the pattern may try to moderate some as we head through this week, we have clearly entered a weather pattern prone to frequent clippers. If we can maintain or get a reinforcement of fresh cold air, it is looking like our chances for a white Christmas this year may be higher than normal. 

There are signs in the long-range models that more cold air should arrive toward the end of the month. In fact, it is possible that the Ohio Valley could see a “battle-zone” of sorts set up around Christmas week between colder air trying to get reinforced from the northwest and moist, warmer air trying to get pushed northward. 

This could mean a bigger storm system could be brewing around that time-frame somewhere in our region. Of course, timing is everything, but it still looks like the weather will be busy the rest of the month.

WPAFB Monday Weather: Possible afternoon shower, snow to move into Tuesday

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 12:11 AM

WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE—More clouds are expected on Monday, and while it will be a notch warmer, it’s still going to be below the normal high for this time of the year, according to Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Brett Collar.

RELATED: Dayton Interactive Radar - WHIO Doppler 7

We’ll see highs in the upper 30s. Some models hint at a passing light shower north of I-70 this afternoon, but those chances look pretty slim. Most will stay dry today. That will change though overnight as more snow moves in.

RELATED: County-by-County Weather 

That snow looks to linger into your Tuesday.