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Jameis Winston says boys should be strong, girls silent and gentle during school appearance

Published: Thursday, February 23, 2017 @ 11:15 AM
Updated: Thursday, February 23, 2017 @ 11:15 AM


            CHARLOTTE, NC - OCTOBER 10: Jameis Winston #3 of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers warms up before the game against the Carolina Panthers at Bank of America Stadium on October 10, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
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Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston said something Wednesday during an elementary school appearance that he wishes he could take back, like an errant pass.

Winston was speaking to third- through fifth-graders at Melrose Elementary, according to the Tampa Bay Times. At one point, when the kids appeared to be losing interest, Winston had the boys in the room stand up, while telling the girls to sit down. He told the boys, "All my boys, stand up. We strong, right? We strong! We strong, right? All my boys, tell me one time: I can do anything I put my mind to. Now a lot of boys aren't supposed to be soft-spoken."

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Winston said about girls: "But the ladies, they're supposed to be silent, polite, gentle. My men, my men (are) supposed to be strong. I want y'all to tell me what the third rule of life is: I can do anything I put my mind to. Scream it!"

According to a school staffer, a female student turned to her after Winston spoke and said, "I'm strong too."

Afterward, Winston claimed that he misspoke: "During my talk, I used a poor word choice that may have overshadowed that positive message for some."

As ESPN reported, Winston has been working on rehabilitating his image. In 2012, while playing football at Florida State University, Winston was accused of sexually assaulting a female student. While Winston was never charged with a crime, last year he settled a federal lawsuit filed by the woman. The school also settled with the woman last year.

Chad Johnson advised Roger Goodell on NFL celebration regulations

Published: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 5:18 PM
Updated: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 5:18 PM

Sometimes stories come along that are almost too good to be true.

CINCINNATI – OCTOBER 26: Chad Johnson #85 of Cincinnati Bengals celebrates with fans in the seating area after the Bengals 27-24 win over the Seattle Seahawks on October 26, 2003 at Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

CBS Sports reports Cincinnati Bengals legend Chad Johnson gave NFL commissioner Roger Goodell some advice as he was considering loosening some of the restrictions on self-expression after touchdowns this season.

“He asked my advice on what he could do to be able to loosen the reins on the celebration rules, but at the same time maintain the respect and integrity of the game.

“And I said, ‘It’s a fine line, and you have to find a way to find a balance between letting the players have fun and be themselves, without losing the integrity of the game as well.’”

This is perfect, of course, because it is akin to the FBI or CIA consulting the world’s best computer hacker about cyber security.

Johnson happens to make a lot of good points, too.

Source: Chad Johnson plays part in new celebration rule, probably deserves refund on fines – CBSSports.com

NFL loosens up celebration dance rule

Published: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 @ 11:12 PM

The National Football League is relaxing some rules around celebration dances for players, according to an announcement from Commissioner Roger Goodell on Tuesday.

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“We know that you love the spontaneous displays of emotion that come after a spectacular touchdown," Goodell said a letter to fans. “And players have told us they want more freedom to be able to express themselves and celebrate their athletic achievements.”

The New York Times reported that the decision was made by NFL owners as one of several rule changes at the Spring League Meeting in Chicago Tuesday.

Other rule changes include decreasing regular-season overtime from 15 minutes to 10, allowing two players to come off of injured reserve instead of one, banning jumping over the line to block kicks, and the elimination of one of the preseason roster cuts.

The letter lists some examples of celebrations that will be allowed under the new policy: 

  • Using the football as a prop after a touchdown, such as simulating a basket ball jump shot with a football,
  • Celebrating on the ground -- such as making snow angels, and 
  • Group demonstrations, like a coordinated dance move.

Those approved types of celebrations, allowed after scores, are illustrated in the letter in GIF form. 

Still, it’s not a free for all, ESPN reported.

“In my conversations with NFL players, it was also clear how much our players care about sportsmanship, clean competition and setting good examples for young athletes,” Goodell said. “That is why offensive demonstrations, celebrations that are prolonged and delay the game, and those directed at an opponent will still be penalized.”

So things like weapon imagery, such as a machine gun simulation, or sexually suggestive acts -- like Pittsburgh Steelers receiver Antonio Brown’s end zone twerking, are still things that can be penalized.

The strategy may lessen the number of unsportsmanlike-conduct penalties called on touchdowns. According to ESPN, the 2016 season had the highest number of penalties of the past five seasons with 29 called. Of the past three seasons, it has the highest cost of fines for touchdown celebrations at $310,301, up more than $240,000 from the 2015 season.

Former Buckeye hoping to impress the Bengals

Published: Saturday, May 06, 2017 @ 9:59 PM
Updated: Saturday, May 06, 2017 @ 10:18 PM

Corey Smith says all he wants is a chance to prove he can play, which is something he never really got in four years at Ohio State. The former Buckeyes receiver gets that chance as one of several free agents trying to make an impression at the Bengals rookie minicamp.

“I’m just going to go out there and compete and do what I’ve gotta do,” Smith said. “I know how to get open, I know how to catch the ball, and I’ve got a very high IQ of what to do when I’m out there.”

A rare junior college recruit at Ohio State, Smith caught 2 passes for 76 yards in the Buckeyes win over Oregon in the 2014 national championship game. The next season he broke his leg and missed the last of the 2015 schedule.

Smith spent more time on the sidelines than on the field in 2016, but he saved his best for last with a pair of catches against Clemson in the Fiesta Bowl.

“It’s feeling like I just got to Ohio State,” Smith said during a break in practice at Paul Brown Stadium. “I have to pick up the speed of the game, but it’s funny because everything coach (Urban) Meyer talked about is actually true.”

Bengals rookie on the ‘art’ of sacking a QB

Published: Friday, May 05, 2017 @ 9:15 PM
Updated: Saturday, May 06, 2017 @ 11:13 AM

It’s a violent game full of contact, collisions, and pain but Carl Lawson sees football in a much different light.

The Bengals fourth-round draft pick made a name for himself at Auburn as a guy who can get to the quarterback. To some it’s a talent, to Lawson it’s more of an art form.

“It’s a thing of beauty just to watch somebody else on film do something cool,” Lawson said in the Bengals locker room today. “ I study it and I watch it all the time…it’s a beautiful thing.”

Lawson lined up mostly as a defensive end at Auburn, but the Bengals see him as more of a linebacker.

“They want me to play both and this is what they brought me in here to do. I need to be able to learn to do that and do it better than anybody else in the league.”

The Georgia native struggled to stay healthy in college and he anxious to put the injury bug behind him, but back to the “beautiful” part of the game. Lawson says there is more to pressure than meets the eye.

“Rushing the passer is not always about getting sacks,” the rookie said. “It’s being able to affect the quarterback and make him move his feet, make him throw off balance, just anything to disrupt the passing attack. It’s a critical part of the game.”