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Wright State faculty ask for laid off colleagues to be rehired

Published: Friday, February 17, 2017 @ 11:49 AM


            Wright State faculty members asked the university’s board of trustees to reinstate instructors who are set to be laid off. Some faculty stood at the back of the room to protest the cuts.
Wright State faculty members asked the university’s board of trustees to reinstate instructors who are set to be laid off. Some faculty stood at the back of the room to protest the cuts.

Wright State University faculty, representing the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors, today asked the board of trustees to reinstate faculty positions that were cut last fall.

The university announced in October 2016 that it would eliminate 23 positions, including six faculty jobs, following spring semester. The cuts were one way the university said it was dealing with its budget issues and a drop of enrollment in WSU’s College of Liberal Arts.

RELATED: Wright State merges departments to create new school

The first faculty member to speak at the board meeting this morning, Gretchen McNamara, a lecturer in the school of music, said that students “are devastated” to be “stripped away” from their instructors. The elimination of positions in the music school will make Wright State a less competitive university, McNamara said.

The October layoffs included two instructors in the school of music, officials have said.

Another faculty member pointed to arguments that the university needs to up enrollment to increase revenue as a reason why instructors should not have been laid off.

“Faculty are the revenue generators,” said Noeleen Mcllvenna, a WSU history professor. “We need more faculty not less. The rest is just noise.”

Wright State president David Hopkins said he understands faculty concerns and that he hopes enrollment increases so that faculty members who were laid off can eventually return if they want to.

“It’s always the last thing we want to do,” Hopkins said of the layoffs. “Because of the circumstances of the budget and enrollment challenges, these are the tough decisions we’re forced to make.

RELATED: Students call for WSU foundation to divest from hedge funds

Additional faculty stood at the back of the trustees meeting Friday where they held signs protesting the cuts, budget issues and the Wright State University foundation’s hedge fund holdings.

Students today were set to call for the foundation to divest from its hedge fund holdings. Hedge fund holdings make up about $6 million or 8 percent of the foundation’s nearly $80-million endowment, according to a statement from WSU spokesman Seth Bauguess.

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Ford recalls 117K trucks, SUVs

Published: Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 7:59 AM

FILE PHOTO: A Ford Escape is seen on a dealerships lot on September 26, 2014.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
FILE PHOTO: A Ford Escape is seen on a dealerships lot on September 26, 2014.(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Ford has issued a recall involving almost 117,000 trucks and SUVs.

That’s because the company says the bolts in the seat, seat belt or seat belt buckle may break. If they fracture, the seat or the seat belt could fail in a sudden stop or a crash, the Associated Press reported.

>> Read more trending news

Ford said it is not aware of any accidents or injuries caused by the issue, but customers will be notified. Dealerships will replace the bolts for free.

The 2014 F-Series pickup, 2014 E-Series van, 2014 and 2015 Ford Escape and the 2015 Lincoln MKC SUV are all under this latest recall, the AP reported.

The Biggest Product Recalls in US History

Dixie Twin Drive-in armed robbery suspect empties register

Published: Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 12:40 AM

Robbery reported at Dixie Twin Drive-In

Police are seeking a gunman who robbed a drive-in movie theater early today in Harrison Twp.

The armed robbery suspect was wearing all black clothing and a black mask when around 12:30 a.m. he displayed a black handgun to workers at the box office of the Dixie Twin Drive-In, 6201 N. Dixie Drive. He fled with all the contents in the register, according to Montgomery County Regional Dispatch reports.

READ: Multi-county I-75 pursuit involving OSP ends in crash, 2 in hospital

The suspect, described as approximately 6 feet tall with a stocky build who weighs about 200 pounds, fled northeast through the woods toward Miller Lane, according to the dispatch center.

The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident.

Missing Florida woman found because she saved her scent with kit

Published: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 @ 3:46 PM

Missing Florida Woman Found Because She Saved Her Scent With Kit

A Florida woman with dementia, who was missing for hours, was found within five minutes of a K-9 being dispatched all because she saved her scent. 

>> Read more trending news 

Deputy Justin Williams and a K-9 named Ally tracked down the missing, endangered elderly woman Tuesday using a scent preservation kit she made two years ago. 

The kits require people to swab under their arms with a sterile pad and seal it inside a container. If the person ever goes missing, the unique smell captured can easily be tracked by a K-9. 

“The woman was returned home safely and K9 Ally was rewarded with a special treat, a tasty vanilla ice cream cone,” the Citrus County Sheriff’s Office wrote on Facebook

Clock ticks as “Skinny” Senate GOP health bill remains a mystery

Published: Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 7:36 AM

With half of the debate completed in the U.S. Senate on a House-passed bill to overhaul the Obama health law, Republicans have yet to reveal the details of what may be the only GOP option that can get a majority of votes, a streamlined measure which would change only a few provisions of current health law.

“I don’t know what the “skinny” repeal looks like,” said Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN) to a group of reporters, as he acknowledged doing the bare minimum on health care might be about the only way to keep GOP options open on changes to Obamacare.

“What you’re really voting on is to try to keep the discussions alive between the House and Senate,” Corker told reporters.

The way the “skinny” Republican option has been described in recent days is this:

+ Zero out the tax penalty on the individual mandate (note – this does not “repeal” the mandate – it just reduces the penalty to $0).

+ Zero out the employer mandate penalty

+ Repeal the medical device tax.

But there were rumblings on Wednesday that the details of the plan would have to be fiddled with, leaving GOP Senators in the dark on what they might be voting on late on Thursday night, or Friday.

“I want to see what it says; I don’t know what it says – no one knows what it says yet,” Corker said.

“All of this right now is procedural setup to get to an end that none of us are certain what it’s going to look like,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA).

“I’d rather comment when we see it actually formulated,” said Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) of the “skinny” Senate bill.

Down at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue, President Trump was continuing to press GOP Senators for action, using his platform on Twitter to make one more direct appeal on Thursday morning.

But as the day began, it wasn’t clear whether there would be 50 Republican votes for any GOP health plan in the Senate – skinny or not.

For seven years, many Republicans and conservative groups have pushed a story line that wasn’t completely true about the Congressional debate on the Obama health law – that few hearings were held, that the bill text was kept a secret until the bitter end, that the House and Senate votes were done in the middle of the night, and more.

Having covered the legislative battle over the Obama health law, many of those criticisms weren’t entirely accurate – but the irony right now is that the GOP may be following a health care script in 2017 which mirrors many of their own complaints from 2009 and 2010.