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Wright Patt: Physician part of Air Force’s global health initiative

Published: Friday, July 07, 2017 @ 10:26 AM


            U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Glenn Burns demonstrates how to communicate and read a patient’s symptoms during a cardiac arrest event using the METIman during the Advance Cardiovascular Life Support class in the simulation center at the military hospital in Kigali, Rwanda, May 3. Basic Life Support and Advanced Cardiac Life Support are part of phase four of the Defense Institute for Medical Operations program funded by the African military education to establish a reliable simulation center for the Rwanda military hospital to support United Nations peace-keeping operations.(U.S. Air Force photo/Ruth A. Medinavillanueva)
U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Glenn Burns demonstrates how to communicate and read a patient’s symptoms during a cardiac arrest event using the METIman during the Advance Cardiovascular Life Support class in the simulation center at the military hospital in Kigali, Rwanda, May 3. Basic Life Support and Advanced Cardiac Life Support are part of phase four of the Defense Institute for Medical Operations program funded by the African military education to establish a reliable simulation center for the Rwanda military hospital to support United Nations peace-keeping operations.(U.S. Air Force photo/Ruth A. Medinavillanueva)

Lt. Col. (Dr.) Glenn Burns’ passion for improving health has taken him around the world – to 65 countries and counting.

Commander of the 88th Emergency Services Flight, 88th Medical Operations Squadron, 88th Medical Group, Burns travels extensively because he is a recognized international health specialist and master educator. He is often accompanied by personally hand-picked medical specialists as well as medical residents, so they can develop their expertise in global health engagement missions.

Burns also is an associate professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine and Division of Pediatric Critical Care.

During the past year he’s traveled on missions to Rwanda six times and also to Laos, Cambodia, the Philippines and Thailand as part of joint operations between the Department of State and U.S. combatant commanders. His next venture will be to the Ukraine.

The Department of State works with such commanders to determine what regional needs are and how the U.S. military may cooperate with that country on improvement and stabilization efforts.

Burns joined the Air Force in 1997 and has devoted much of the last decade to global health engagement, he said, and wants more Air Force personnel to know about the opportunities such work affords.

“The International Health Specialist Program is a great opportunity, along with the Defense Institute for Medical Operations Program. They are looking for people with competitive academic credentials and experience, along with a certain amount of cultural competence,” Burns said.

He became passionate about global health because he wanted to do something different in his Air Force career.

“The Air Force tells you to expand your horizons and look for opportunities. I’ve always had an interest in preventive medicine, disaster medicine and global health and how to make the world a better place. You can make huge impacts when you work in international health,” he said.

As an example, he cited his most recent trip in May to Kigali, Rwanda, to help establish a reliable simulation center for the military hospital there to support United Nations peace-keeping operations. The DIMO-funded missions are assisting the Rwandan military with training their physicians to become their own instructors.

“Now they can train their own trainers so they can practice the same standards as we do and they can certify their own people,” Burns pointed out. “A big goal of what we do is to assist other countries to build capabilities they might not have otherwise.”

Wright Patt: Pathologists pave way for more accurate medical treatment

In Rwanda he helped personnel meet one of the United Nations’ standards of managing a cardiac patient’s arrest and survival.

“The Rwandan personnel were amazing to work with,” he said. “They are extremely open, receptive and excited learners who follow up with in-depth questions. Teaching there was very rewarding. ”

Burns said he is proud to be a part of Air Force Materiel Command’s culture of expertise and footprint in sending forth pockets of international health specialists.

He said he is thankful that his work is so well supported by Air Force Medical Service leadership, including Col. Shari Silverman, 88 MDG commander.

But the lieutenant colonel is away from home frequently, which can be a challenge to his spouse, Lt. Col. (Dr.) Cassandra Burns, a pediatric neurologist in the 88 MDG, and their three children, ages 16 to 5.

“They don’t like it when Dad is gone, and Dad doesn’t like it when Dad is gone,” he laughed. “But such work helps me expand the next generation of Air Force physicians so they get the knowledge and wisdom of what we’re doing. They are learning how to practice international medicine.”

Burns is encouraging Airmen to retrain and pursue a career change as an international health specialist or if not interested in a medical career, enter the Language Enabled Airman Program. LEAP sustains, enhances and utilizes the existing language skills and talents of Airmen across specialties and careers.

“When I hear people on base speaking a second language, I ask them if they are a ‘LEAPster.’ We don’t have enough such Airmen who have this expertise; we need more for international missions,” Burns said.

Judge limits Middletown cat rescue owner’s contact with animals

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 4:23 PM
Updated: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 1:19 PM

Lesli Martin Sentencing

The former owner of a Middletown cat rescue was sentenced Wednesday after being found guilty of animal cruelty in August.

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Lesli Martin, who was found guilty of five of six charges of cruelty to companion animals, was sentenced to pay $500 for each of the five counts and court costs for one count by Middletown Municipal Court Judge Melynda Cook Howard.

The judge also sentenced Martin to 30 days in jail on each of the five charges, but suspended the jail time if she successfully completes one year probation.

Martin was ordered to pay restitution to Animals Friends Humane Society for euthanasia fees and cruelty exam fees and to the Butler County dog warden for the 28 animals it took that were in her care. Martin was ordered to pay a total of more than $2,148 in restitution.

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She will be allowed to keep one dog and three cats she has in her personal possession. For an indefinite period of time, however, she will not be allowed to have any other animals.

Cook Howard made it clear that Martin was to own no additional companion animals of any kind.

“No cats, dogs or four-legged animals. Not a gerbil, not a hamster, not a llama, not a goat,” the judge said.

Martin is also prohibited from running an animal shelter, volunteering at an animal shelter, or being involved in any way with an animal shelter for an indefinite period of time.

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A search warrant was served Nov. 30 at Martin’s rescue, then located at a storefront in Middletown Shopping Center, and 50 cats were found. About 28 cats that were sick and injured were seized from the shelter, according to records.

One cat and five kittens were euthanized because a veterinarian determined they were suffering from multiple medical conditions, including ring worm and flea anemia. Those animals were the basis of the charges against Martin, 51.

Martin told the judge before sentencing that the mother cats were taken by her shelter and had kittens. Those kittens developed discharge from their nose and she did that them to the veterinarian. When two of the kittens were not getting any better, Martin said she made an appointment to take them back for treatment.

“I was diligent with medication … I did everything I could,” Martin said.

Cook Howard told Martin she thought her heart was in the right place, but that she was reckless in not proceeding with getting the kittens the care they needed, thus, “the animals suffered and were put to death.”

The judge said she did not believe Martin intentionally harmed the cats, if that were the case, “you would be serving multiple days in jail.”

‘He can’t hear you’: Police officer shoots deaf man as neighbors scream warning

Published: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 10:15 AM

Deaf Man Fatally Shot By Oklahoma City Officers, Criminal Investigation Underway

An Oklahoma City police officer fatally shot a deaf man Tuesday night as the man’s neighbors screamed warnings that the man could not hear them.

Magdiel Sanchez, 35, was pronounced dead at the scene in his front yard, according to police officials. Sanchez, who authorities confirm had no criminal record, was a resident alien from Mexico who had lived in his home for about five years, a neighbor told the Oklahoman

The neighbor, Julio Rayos, witnessed Sanchez’ death. He told the newspaper he does not believe the shooting was justified. 

“I don’t think they had to shoot him,” Rayos said of the officers, both of whom are white. 

Capt. Bo Mathews, a police department spokesman, confirmed witnesses’ statements that they tried to tell the officers that Sanchez could not hear them demanding he drop the metal pipe he held in his hand. 

“The witnesses did hear the officers giving the verbal commands, but they were also yelling, ‘He can’t hear you,’” Mathews said.  

Mathews said it is possible that the officers did not hear the witnesses’ screams. 

“In those situations, very volatile situations, when you have a weapon out, you can get what they call tunnel vision or you can really lock into just the person that has the weapon that'd be the threat against you,” Mathews told reporters at a news conference Wednesday morning. “I don't know exactly what the officers were thinking at that point, because I was not there. But they very well could not have heard, you know, everybody yelling, everybody yelling around them.”

Watch the entire news conference below.

Mathews said that officers were working a hit-and-run accident just after 8 p.m. Tuesday when a witness told them they could find the green truck involved in the crash at a nearby house, which turned out to be Sanchez’s home. When Lt. Matthew Lindsey arrived at the scene, Sanchez was on the porch with what was first described as a large stick. 

Mathews said the item turned out to be a two-foot-long metal pipe wrapped in material, with a leather loop at the end.

“He had this in his right hand and he was holding it up,” Mathews said of Sanchez. 

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Mathews said when Sanchez advanced toward Lindsey, the officer, who had pulled his Taser, called for backup. That backup arrived in the form of Sgt. Christopher Barnes, who pulled his duty weapon.

Both officers yelled commands for Sanchez to drop his weapon, Mathews said. 

“The witnesses also were yelling that this person, Mr. Sanchez, was deaf and could not hear,” Mathews said. “The officers didn't know this at the time.”

Lindsey deployed his Taser and Barnes simultaneously fired multiple shots at Sanchez, striking him as he stood about 15 feet from the officers, Mathews said. They provided medical attention until emergency medical personnel arrived, but Sanchez died in his yard.

It was later determined that Sanchez’s father was the driver involved in the hit-and-run accident. Sanchez was not in the vehicle, Mathews said.

Oklahoma City Police Capt. Bo Mathews demonstrates how Magdiel Sanchez reportedly held a metal pipe before he was shot and killed by a police officer Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. Mathews said that the Oklahoma City police officer who opened fire on Sanchez may not have heard witnesses screaming that the deaf man could not hear officers telling him to drop the pipe.(AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Barnes was placed on paid administrative leave, though Lindsey remains on active duty, Mathews said. The shooting is being investigated by the department’s homicide unit, as all officer-involved slayings are. 

The information from the investigation will be turned over to the Oklahoma County District Attorney’s Office, where prosecutors will determine if the killing was justified, he said. Once that determination is made, the department will conduct an internal investigation into Barnes’ actions. 

When asked if any of the officers involved were wearing body cameras, Mathews said that officers responding to the shooting wore cameras, but Lindsey and Barnes did not. 

Rayos told the Oklahoman that besides being deaf, Sanchez also had developmental disabilities and was non-verbal.

“The guy does movements,” Rayos told the newspaper. “He don’t speak, he don’t hear, mainly it is hand movements. That’s how he communicates.”

Rayos said he believes Sanchez was frustrated as he tried to communicate with the officers. 

NPR reported that another neighbor, Jolie Guebara, said Sanchez often carried the pipe when walking through his neighborhood. He used the pipe as protection from a number of stray dogs that roamed the area, she said. 

Former Blue Jacket theater set for demolition in Greene County

Published: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 11:15 AM

Greene County Parks & Trails looking to make Caesar's Ford Park more accessible

It’s been 10 years since the Blue Jacket theater group performed at Caesar’s Ford Park, and now the dilapidated buildings are slated to be torn down.

A padlock on the front gates keeps the public out of the park at 520 S. Stringtown Road. The structures, which were built in the 1970s, have not been maintained and now pose safety hazards, Greene County officials said.

>>PHOTOS: Looking back at the memories made at former Blue Jacket theater

“It’s a sad end of an era, but the future is bright,” said Brandon Huddleson, Greene County administrator.

Rezod LLC has been awarded the $308,851 contract to demolish the buildings and clear the way for reopening the 65-acre park and exploring new recreational options for residents.

STAY CONNECTED: Greene County News on Facebook

Remnants of the Blue Jacket Amphitheater in Caesar’s Ford Park in Greene County. TY GREENLEES / STAFF(Staff Writer)

To pay for the three-month project, county commissioners approved spending $208,000 out of the general and capital funds, and the park district is providing $100,000. County officials have not said when the demolition work will begin.

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Memories of the Blue Jacket theater

Many people, like Kevin Carsey of Beavercreek, earned lifelong memories working at the amphitheater and seeing the life of Blue Jacket, a famous American Indian who lived in the Greene County region, portrayed in the open air.

“It is a sacred land,” said the 39-year-old father of two. Carsey got chills as he recalled walking the trail toward the back of the property and being near the area that was dubbed “the medicine wheel.”

“At the end of the show, the actors would say ‘look around you at the forest and listen to the streams nearby’ … The spiritual piece of that is just huge for those of us who worked at the theater,” he said.

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Carsey and others want an opportunity to visit the park and the buildings before they are torn down. Carsey said there was always a ceremony at the beginning of the shows to show respect for the Americans Indians who once lived in the region. He hopes the county allows a similar ceremony before the demolition work begins.

Elizabeth Gutierrez Burke, 33, of Riverside, started acting in the shows when she was 12. When she wasn’t acting, she would work as an usher, and her siblings also participated in the shows.

“We weren’t just a cast, we were a family that transcended seasons,” Burke said. “That show will always be a part of every cast and crew member to grace that stage.”

Remnants of the Blue Jacket Amphitheater in Caesar’s Ford Park in Greene County. TY GREENLEES / STAFF(Staff Writer)

‘A beautiful piece of property’

The strong sentimental ties the community has to the park are not lost on Greene County Parks and Trails Director Chrisbell Bednar.

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“A lot of people grew up out there,” Bednar said. “They had their summer job out there. A lot of people have great, fond memories of being part of the show or seeing the show.”

Bednar said the seats that make up the amphitheater will be disassembled and removed before demolition in an effort to preserve them for future use. She said measures will be in place to try to avoid damaging the concrete that forms the seating area, but the iconic light tower, which shined down onto the large outdoor stage, will have to come down.

“It’s a beautiful piece of property,” Bednar said. “We want to make it a multi-use facility for various programs throughout the year. Cycling and equestrian groups have made inquiries, and they need a big facility, but right now we can’t open it to the general public.”

The Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail passes through a portion of the park, and extending the trail is part of the ongoing conversation about what to do after the demolition work is over.

Dayton child, 3, dies in drowning at Georgia pool

Published: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 1:15 PM

A 3-year-old Dayton girl has died after family members found her underwater in a backyard pool at a vacation home in Hall County, Georgia near Atlanta.

Kenlee Ward died from her injuries after being transported to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston on Monday following the incident, according to a report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

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Hall County Sheriff’s Deputy Stephen Wilbanks said Ward was pulled from the water, given CPR and someone called 911.

No other information was immediately available.