Would you vote to raise driver’s license fees? State may let you decide

Published: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 6:38 PM
Updated: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 6:38 PM

Would you pay $140 plate fee to avoid state gas taxes?

If counties want to increase vehicle registration fees to help pay for roads and bridges, it won’t be easy.

The Senate Transportation Committee decided Monday that local voter approval should be required before counties can levy an additional $5 fee on vehicle registrations. The committee also agreed to change how gas tax revenues are allocated to local road and bridge projects so that an additional $24 million a year is generated.

RELATED: Ohio House votes to raise driver’s license fees

Senate Transportation Committee Chairman Frank LaRose, R-Copley, said he expects to take testimony on House Bill 26 early this week and put the measure up for a full floor vote as early as Wednesday.

The bill prescribes how Ohio will spend $7.82 billion on transportation over the next two years. The revenue comes from fees, federal highway money and the state gas tax, which has stood at 28 cents per gallon since July 2005.

The House voted 83-13 in favor of the legislation on March 1. Once the Senate approves its version, the bill will return to the House for agreement or rejection of Senate changes.

Related: Did you know you can get a ticket for starting your car unattended?

The bill would allow deputy registrars who run the state’s approximately 200 Bureau of Motor Vehicles offices to charge $1.75 more for transactions.

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Car gets stuck, catches fire after rear-ending semi on I-70 

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 1:59 AM
Updated: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 2:35 AM

Staff Photo/Joey Bryant
Staff Photo/Joey Bryant

Two people were injured when a car that rear-ended a semi on I-70 got stuck and caught fire early Thursday morning.

Around 1:45 a.m., a car rear-ended the semi in the middle lane of westbound Interstate 70 near mile marker 42, trooper said. The car became stuck, and the semi dragged the car for a couple hundred feet.

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The semi driver was able to pull off to the right shoulder, at which point the car caught fire.

The driver and passenger of the car were able to escape before the car became fully engulfed. They were taken to Soin Medical Center with minor injuries, trooper said.

The car driver will be cited with failure to maintain distance. It’s unknown if the driver was impaired, troopers said.

The driver of the semi was not injured. Contents from the semi were being loaded onto another semi.

The right lane was closed while troopers investigated the crash.

OSP cruiser hit in Dayton after I-75N pursuit from Middletown

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 12:01 AM
Updated: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 2:21 AM

Pursuit ends on Keowee St in Dayton

A trooper’s cruiser was struck Wednesday night in Dayton during a pursuit that began in Middletown.

The chase involved a white Chevrolet Camaro, which began on northbound Interstate 75 south of exit 32 (Ohio 122).

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Three people were taken into custody, and the trooper was not hurt, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Hamilton Post.

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Keowee Street was closed just north of Third Street and police had taped the area off for the investigation.

A Miamisburg man said he was in his vehicle at East Third and Keowee streets when a white Camaro — its headlights out — raced by him from behind.

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T.C. Cavinder said the sports car narrowly missed his and another vehicle, hit curbs along Keowee and stopped near a bridge. A man in the Camaro hopped out and threw up his hands, Cavinder said.

We are working to find out what led to the pursuit.

Convicted rapist won't have joint custody of victim's child after judge rescinds ruling

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 1:49 AM

Woman’s Rapist Gets Joint Custody Of Child He Fathered In Assault

The Michigan judge behind a controversial ruling last month, which granted a convicted sex offender joint legal custody to the child conceived by his 12-year-old victim in 2008, has rescinded his decisionCBS News reports.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Woman’s rapist gets joint custody of child he fathered in assault

Sanilac County Judge Gregory Ross ruled Tuesday that 27-year-old Christopher Mirasolo will not have any parental rights to the 8-year-old boy. However, he will still be expected to pay for child support.

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Mirasolo was not seeking custody of the child. This odd scenario started when the mother, now 21, sought state assistance for her son. Ross ruled for joint legal custody after a DNA test verified Mirasolo was the boy’s biological father.

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Why did Ross initially grant Mirasolo legal custody? John Nevin, a spokesman for the Michigan Supreme Court, said that Ross wasn’t aware of Mirasolo’s two convictions, nor of how he and the mother were connected. After learning of Mirasolo’s record, Ross put the order on hold and rescheduled a hearing for Tuesday.

In a statement released to the Port Huron Times Herald, Sanilac County Prosecutor James Young said he wanted to “express [officials’] apologies for the manner in which this case was handled.”

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The mother, identified only as Tiffany, spoke to CBS News earlier this month and expressed dismay that the judge would grant her attacker joint custody of her son. She said she had to provide the father’s name as a condition of receiving state financial assistance.

“I was receiving government assistance, and they told me if I did not tell them who the father was of my child, that they would take that away from me,” Tiffany said.

She said “horrible things” and “flashbacks” still come to mind when she hears Mirasolo’s name.

Tipp City family: Petland offers little help to puppy with hip dysplasia

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 9:09 PM

Petland puppy has "worst case" of hip condition vet has seen

A family says the puppy they bought from a Dayton pet store has one of the worst cases of hip dysplasia their vet has ever seen.

They are blaming the store and its breeders for selling them the injured dog, but the store says it’s not their fault.

Thor, a young German shepherd, loves on everyone who comes through the front door at the Miller home. At 9 months old, he already has serious, debilitating medical issues, and is in pain.

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“It’s every day and he’s on pain medicine but they’re not doing much at all,” his owner, Courtney Miller said.

She and her father-in-law, Frank Miller, bought the pup in March from a Petland in Dayton. At the time, Thor was given a clean bill of health. But almost immediately, Courtney Miller said she noticed something was wrong with his hips.

“Pretty much everything is wrong with them. They area all out of socket. Walking up the steps he does a bunny hop. Outside he tries to walk around and his legs just hit each other,” Miller said. “So he’s just all in pain. He can barely sit, he cannot lay down.”

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Miller’s veterinarian said Thor likely was born with his severe hip dysplasia.

That’s when Miller and her father-in-law called Petland’s corporate office, which offered a partial reimbursement, or money toward a new dog.

“Two thousand dollars for his expense, which we know it’s going to be more. Or we give you $4,000 towards a new dog. You know, that’s like giving up your kid,” Frank Miller said.

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JR Badger, director of Petland’s companty stores, sent an email to Miller around 8 p.m., hours after Miller’s story ran on WHIO-TV.

It reads: “Good evening Courtney! I am sorry you are dealing with this. All you will need to do is take Thor to MedVet for the consultation and they will bill us directly ... Thank you and we will get Thor taken care of.”

A subsequent email sent just before 9 p.m. clarified that the offer is for a second opinion. 

“Let’s get the consultation and see what the doctors recommend. Then we can discuss our options.”