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"They want to erase us." Hunger used to target Rohingya

Published: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 @ 5:17 PM
Updated: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 @ 5:15 PM

In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, photo, a newly arrived Rohingya refugee mother feeds her daughter at a transit camp in Nayaprar refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Thomas MacManus, a specialist in international state crimes, says tightened curfews in Rakhine state meant people couldn’t harvest shrimp or rice, tend to their cattle, gather firewood or fish. Since August, an almost 24-hour-a-day curfew means no one is leaving their villages, he said.
AP Photo/Manish Swarup
In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, photo, a newly arrived Rohingya refugee mother feeds her daughter at a transit camp in Nayaprar refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Thomas MacManus, a specialist in international state crimes, says tightened curfews in Rakhine state meant people couldn’t harvest shrimp or rice, tend to their cattle, gather firewood or fish. Since August, an almost 24-hour-a-day curfew means no one is leaving their villages, he said.

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