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Dogs rescued from meat farm brought to U.S. in search of forever homes

Published: Wednesday, May 04, 2016 @ 5:47 PM


            In this image released on Thursday, April 28, 2016, an HSI rescuer snuggles with a dog at the Incheon airport before his flight to the US. Humane Society International rescued the dogs from a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea this week, the fifth such farm that the organization has closed down as part of its campaign to end the dog meat trade. A total of 171 dogs are being flown to shelters and rescues in the United States and Canada for a second chance at life. (Meredith Lee/Humane Society International via AP Images)

Humane Society International has again rescued dozens of dogs from a South Korean meat farm. 

The 171 dogs and puppies were rescued from a farm in Wonju that has now closed, making it the fifth farm HSI has helped close in recent years. 

The owner of the farm contacted the group and asked for its help in getting out of the dog meat business.

In all, 250 dogs and puppies were rescued from this single farm. 

Most South Koreans don't eat dog meat regularly, but it is consumed more during the annual Bok Nal festival and throughout the hot summer months, because many believe it cools their blood. 

A majority of the rescued pups will head to a temporary emergency shelter in New Jersey, and the others will be transported to one of 17 partner shelters in the U.S. or to foster families in Canada. 

But once these dogs reach the U.S., many will likely need rehabilitation before going up for adoption.

shelter that took in dogs rescued from a meat farm in 2015 found that the adult dogs needed more emotional and behavioral help than the puppies. But after working with shelter volunteers, nearly all the dogs were adopted. 

Popular fitness model killed in freak whipped cream accident

Published: Thursday, June 22, 2017 @ 9:00 AM

A popular French fitness model was killed in a freak accident involving a whipped cream dispenser, her family says.

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Fox News reports that Rebecca Burger, who has more than 150,000 followers on Instagram, was killed when a defective whipped cream dispenser exploded and hit her in the chest.

She was 33 years old.

La pratique du culturisme de manière sérieuse et passionnée implique un mode de vie sain mais aussi un mode de vie axé sur le contrôle. Le contrôle de l'alimentation, de l'entrainement, du repos, de la vie en générale. Les journées sont rythmées par le travail, les entrainements, les repas, l'organisation et tout ce qui s'en suit. Pour ma part je me lève tous les jours à 5h30-6h00 et me couche le plus souvent à 21h. Des sorties en semaine ? Non Des party le weekend ? Encore moins, cela impliquerait alors de se coucher aux aurores pour finalement se lever trop tard et pour moi, se serait une journée de gâchée. Attention, je ne jette pas la pierre à ce qu'ils le font mais cela ne rentre juste pas mes principes et encore moins dans mon mode de vie. Tout ce que je fais dans mes journées, les heures de travail, d'entrainement, de réalisation de projets sont dépensées de façon à ce qu'au final, cela m'apporte quelque chose de concret et m'aide à atteindre quotidiennement mes objectifs. Peut-être que ce rythme de vie peut choquer ou provoquer l'incompréhension de pas mal de gens, mais c'est ma vie, celle dans laquelle je me sens vivante, heureuse et épanouie.

A post shared by Rebecca Burger (@rebeccablikes) on

Burger did receive medical attention but died of cardiac arrest, according to reports.

Now her family is warning others not to buy the defective dispensers, claiming thousands of faulty devices are still being sold, according to Fox News.

Read more here.

C'est avec une grande tristesse que nous annonçons le décès de Rebecca le dimanche 18 juin 2017 suite à un accident...

Posted by Rebecca Burger on Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Dramatic video shows aid worker, Texas Aggie rescuing child from ISIS gunfire

Published: Thursday, June 22, 2017 @ 11:47 AM

In this May 5, 2017 file photo, destroyed buildings from fighting between Iraqi forces and the Islamic State group are seen in western Mosul. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen, File)
Bram Janssen/AP

Among the many things that are required of a freshman in Texas A&M’s Corps of Cadets — from buzzed hair, to shined shoes to elaborate rituals for nearly every situation — is to memorize a simple Bible verse, John 15:13.

“Greater love hath no man than this; that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

These are not hollow words in Aggieland. It happened famously in Corregidor; tragically in Fallujah; in the trenches of World War I and mountains of Afghanistan.

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Texas A&M graduate David Eubank knew this when he saw a girl of about 5 amid the remains of her family, slain in the ruins of the streets of Mosul, Iraq.

The girl was alive. There was a wall between her and deadly ISIS snipers.

For one little Iraqi girl, Eubank was prepared to stretch the definition of greater love. 

“I thought, ‘If I die doing this, my wife and kids would understand,’” he later told the Los Angeles Times.

His dramatic rescue was caught on video and can be seen on Youtube. (Warning: The video contains graphic content that may be disturbing to some viewers. Viewer discretion is advised.)

Eubank’s heroism is hardly out of character. He was a Texas toddler when he knew he wanted to be a soldier and a third-generation Aggie. After completing A&M’s Corps of Cadets, the class of ‘83 graduate served 10 years in the U.S. Army. He was a Ranger and, ultimately, a Special Forces commander.

If that seems like enough service for most, Eubank was just getting started. The son of missionaries, in 1997, he founded the Free Burma Rangers to help those displaced by the civil war in Burma. He moved his wife and kids across the world to help provide food, medical care and Christian outreach to those in need.

Nearly 20 years later, the Free Burma Rangers shifted their focus to Iraq, Syria and the victims of Islamic State terrorists.

That brings us back to Mosul, where this month’s dramatic rescue happened.

Nabih Bulos, reporting for the Los Angeles Times, described how it unfolded:

As clouds from the smoke canisters swirl about, he prepares to dash from behind the tank to save the girl. He’s wearing a helmet and a bullet-proof vest over a black T-shirt.

He runs out as his colleagues, armed with machine guns, give covering fire. He scoops up the girl with his right arm, stumbling as he runs back. He’s gone and back in 12 seconds. The girl’s hair is in pigtails, secured with what appear to be pink ribbons.

It wasn’t quite a Hollywood moment. Another toddler seen alive disappeared in the chaos. A wounded man didn’t make it. As for Eubank? He’s not playing the part of action hero. Instead, he works to keep the humility of a Christian aid worker.

“I believe God sent me here, and I don’t think about security,” he told the Times. “... but I always ask myself if I’m doing it out of pride.”

Read the Los Angeles Times interview with Eubank about his rescue and work in Iraq.

Read a Texas Aggie magazine story from 2012 on the Free Burma Rangers.

Tour company used by Otto Warmbier no longer taking Americans to North Korea

Published: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 @ 11:50 AM

The company that organized the trip that took U.S. student Otto Warmbier to North Korea announced Monday that they would no longer take Americans to the Hermit Kingdom after the 22-year-old died, days after he was released back to his home country.

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“The devastating loss of Otto Warmbier's life has led us to reconsider our position on accepting American tourists,” the China-based Young Pioneer Tours company wrote on its Facebook page. “There had not been any previous detainment in North Korea that has ended with such tragic finality and we have been struggling to process the result.”

Warmbier died Monday in Ohio, where he had been hospitalized since his June 13 release.

Our deepest sympathies are with Otto Warmbier and those who loved him. We had held onto hope that he might recover, and...

Posted by Young Pioneer Tours on Monday, June 19, 2017

He had been detained in North Korea since January 2016, when he was arrested in Pyongyang for attempting to steal a propaganda poster from a hotel. He was sentenced to 15 years in prison and hard labor, according to NPR News.

He was medically evacuated last week and returned to the U.S. in a coma. North Korean officials said he became comatose after he was given a sleeping pill following a botulism diagnosis. Doctors with the University of Cincinnati Health system said last week that they found no evidence that Warmbier had suffered from botulism, but that his condition appeared to stem from a cardiopulmonary arrest.

>> Related: Doctors say Otto Warmbier has 'extensive loss of brain tissue' on return from N. Korea

“The way his detention was handled was appalling, and a tragedy like this must never be repeated,” officials with Young Pioneer Tours said Monday. “The assessment of risk for Americans visiting North Korea has become too high.”

Other high-profile tour operators who take travelers to North Korea also said this week that they are “reviewing” their policies regarding traveling Americans in the wake of Warmbier’s death, The Associated Press reported. Tour operators told the wire service that Americans account for about a fifth of all non-Chinese tourism to North Korea.

VIDEOS: Vehicle hits people near London mosque

Published: Sunday, June 18, 2017 @ 11:11 PM
Updated: Sunday, June 18, 2017 @ 8:31 PM

A vehicle struck pedestrians near a mosque in north London early Monday morning, causing several casualties, police said.

One person has been arrested. The London Ambulance Service says the injured are being taken to hospitals. Eyewitnesses reported seeing police give emergency medical treatment to at least one of the injured.

The Muslim Council tweeted that worshippers were struck by a van as they were leaving prayers near the Finsbury Park mosque. It said its prayers are with the victims.

The neighborhood has two mosques, and several hundred worshippers would have been in the area after attending prayers as part of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

The Finsbury Park mosque was associated with extremist ideology for several years after the 9/11 attacks in the United States but was shut down and reorganized. It has not been associated with radical views for more than a decade.

London police have declared the crash a major incident and closed the area to normal traffic. A helicopter circled above the area as a large cordon was established to keep motorists and pedestrians away.

Metropolitan Police said officers were called to the scene on Seven Sisters Road at 12:20 a.m. Monday. Many police cars and ambulances responded to the incident.

No other details were immediately available.

Britain's terrorist alert has been set at "severe" meaning an attack is highly likely.

Earlier this month, a van veered into pedestrians on London Bridge, setting off vehicle and knife attacks that killed eight people and wounded many others on the bridge and in the nearby Borough Market area. Three Muslim extremists who carried out the attack were killed by police.

Manchester was also hit by a severe attack when a bomber killed more than 20 people at an Ariana Grande concert.