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35 children die in north Indian hospital in 3 days

Published: Saturday, August 12, 2017 @ 12:49 PM
Updated: Saturday, August 12, 2017 @ 12:45 PM


            46-year-old Manthala weeps as she hears the news of the death of her one-month-old son Roshan at Baba Raghav Das Medical College Hospital in Gorakhpur, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. Parents of at least 35 children who have died in the state-run hospital over the past three days have alleged that the fatalities were due to the lack of a sufficient oxygen supply in the children's ward. District Magistrate Rajiv Rautela said Saturday that the deaths of the children being treated for different ailments were due to natural causes. He denied that an insufficient oxygen supply led to their deaths. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
46-year-old Manthala weeps as she hears the news of the death of her one-month-old son Roshan at Baba Raghav Das Medical College Hospital in Gorakhpur, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. Parents of at least 35 children who have died in the state-run hospital over the past three days have alleged that the fatalities were due to the lack of a sufficient oxygen supply in the children's ward. District Magistrate Rajiv Rautela said Saturday that the deaths of the children being treated for different ailments were due to natural causes. He denied that an insufficient oxygen supply led to their deaths. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

Parents of at least 35 children who have died in a state-run hospital in northern India over the past three days have alleged that the fatalities were due to the lack of a sufficient oxygen supply in the children's ward.

District Magistrate Rajiv Rautela said Saturday that the deaths of the children being treated for different ailments at the Baba Raghav Das Medical College Hospital in Gorakhpur city in Uttar Pradesh state were due to natural causes. He denied that an insufficient oxygen supply led to their deaths.

Parents said that the oxygen supply to the ward ran out Thursday night and that patients' families were given self-inflating bags to help the children breathe.

"That's the time when the death of the children peaked," said Mritunjaya Singh, whose 7-month-old son was admitted to the hospital and was not among the dead.

The Uttar Pradesh government has ordered an investigation.

Prashant Trivedi, the state's top health official, acknowledged that there was a problem in the pipeline supplying oxygen.

"But the situation was managed through oxygen cylinders," Trivedi said. "The hospital administration has enough supply of cylinders in its stock. So the report about death of children because of oxygen issue is false."

The parents said the company that supplies oxygen to the hospital had earlier threatened to stop the distribution of oxygen unless the government paid its long-overdue bills.

Rautela said that the hospital owed 6.8 million rupees ($106,000) to the company, but added that it had adequate numbers of oxygen cylinders.

Parmatma Gautam, whose 1-month-old nephew, Roshan, died when the oxygen supply stopped, said the hospital authorities and the district administration were trying to cover up their failure to pay the bills on time.

"We saw our baby struggling to breathe and we couldn't do anything," Gautam said as tears flowed down his weather-beaten cheek.

The family had rushed the newborn to the hospital from neighboring Siddharthnagar district on Aug. 9 because he had a high fever.

"We are now going back with his body," Gautam sobbed.

The federal health ministry sent a team of specialists to the hospital Saturday to verify what caused the deaths at the facility, which provides health care to a vast swath of Uttar Pradesh and neighboring Bihar state.

Meanwhile, opposition leaders took to social media to blame Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party, which rules the state, for its neglect and indifference to people's health.

Opposition Congress Party Vice President Rahul Gandhi tweeted: "Deeply pained. My thoughts are with the families of the victims. BJP govt. is responsible & should punish the negligent who caused this tragedy."

Some of the children had been treated for encephalitis, a disease that preys on the young and malnourished and is rampant in the state during the monsoon season, which runs from June till September.

The hospital, which has become a major center for children with encephalitis, has treated nearly 370 cases in the last two months. Of these, 129 children died, said Satish Chandra, a hospital spokesman.

Health activists said successive governments had ignored the threat posed by encephalitis as it was a disease that affected poor, malnourished children.

"Encephalitis has a mortality rate as high as 30 percent. The government needs to tackle it with a rigorous campaign," said R. N. Singh, a medical doctor who has been leading the fight against the disease in Gorakhpur district. "Commonly, this disease affects the voiceless poor, so it has not got the attention it warrants," Singh said.

Gorakhpur is located 300 kilometers (185 miles) southeast of the state capital, Lucknow.

Want better sleep? Cut down on binge-watching, study suggests

Published: Tuesday, August 15, 2017 @ 4:44 PM

It's important to get a good night's sleep, and these eight tips will help you catch some serious Z's. Powder down electronics Block the clock Beds are for sleep Avoid caffeine Eat right before bed No pets allowed

Love to binge-watch? Be cautious, because tuning in to your favorite shows for hours at a time could contribute to poor quality of sleep, according to new research

Scientists from the University of Leuven in Belgium conducted a study to determine the link between television viewing habits and quality of sleep. 

To do so, they handed out a survey to 423 people ages 18 to 25. The questionnaire was designed to record symptoms of insomnia and fatigue and the amount of time participants spend watching TV. 

On average, a binge-watching session lasted for three hours and eight minutes, and 52 percent of respondents viewed three to four episodes in a single sitting. 

After analyzing the data, researchers found that binge-watchers had more symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and greater alertness right before bed. Additionally, binge-watchers were more likely to have a poorer quality of sleep compared to non binge-watchers.

"The narrative structure that characterizes “bingeable” television shows involves a larger number of more diverse storylines that extend beyond one episode...As such, the narrative complexity in these shows leaves viewers thinking about episodes and their sequel after viewing them,” the study said. "This prolongs sleep onset or, in other words, requires a longer period to “cool down” before going to sleep, thus affecting sleep overall.”

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Scientists, however, did note their study did not factor in the different types of television content and television viewing behavior, which could introduce further variables.

“It would be interesting to study whether, for instance, relaxing media content does the opposite,” the study said. 

In the meantime, analysts believe there is one primary way to combat poor sleep caused by binge-watching. They suggest that streaming services allow users to set their “optimal viewing duration” beforehand. 

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An American tourist gave the Nazi salute in Germany - so a stranger beat him up, police say

Published: Sunday, August 13, 2017 @ 3:10 PM



German Federal Archives/Bundesarchiv
(German Federal Archives/Bundesarchiv)

An American tourist in Germany was beaten up by a passerby after he began giving the Nazi salute outside a cafe in Dresden, police said Sunday.

The incident occurred about 8:15 a.m. Saturday as the man left a cafe called Europe in the Neustadt district of Dresden, police said in a statement. The district is known to be a liberal part of the town and a popular meeting spot for students.

The tourist was identified only as a 41-year-old American man who was "severely drunk," according to police. He suffered minor injuries, while the stranger who assailed him fled the scene, police said.

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Police said the U.S. national is under investigation for violating German laws prohibiting Nazi symbols and that they are still seeking the passerby for causing personal injury, according to the Associated Press.

The Nazi salute - the right arm straight and angled slightly up, palm down - was used as a greeting and a way of expressing devotion to Adolf Hitler under the Third Reich. Germany outlawed the salute after World War II, along with Holocaust denial and other symbols and signals associated with the Nazis. A conviction can carry a prison sentence of up to three years, although courts often impose fines instead.

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The Dresden incident occurred just a week after two Chinese tourists were detained for giving Nazi salutes outside Berlin's Reichstag, once home to the Imperial Diet. The two tourists were fined nearly $600 each but were permitted to leave the country with their tour group, police said. Similarly, a 30-year-old Canadian tourist was detained in 2011 after being photographed giving the Nazi salute outside the Reichstag. He, too, got off with a fine.

Germany is not the only European country to ban the salute. Earlier this month, Switzerland's Supreme Court upheld the conviction of a man who appeared in 2013 photos making the Nazi salute outside a Geneva synagogue.

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The Washington Post's Isaac Stanley-Becker contributed to this report.

Related

Hungry sea lice likely attacked, bloodied teen's legs at Australian beach

Published: Monday, August 07, 2017 @ 3:20 AM
Updated: Monday, August 07, 2017 @ 3:59 AM

Hungry Sea Lice Likely Attacked, Bloodied Teen's Legs At Australian Beach

An Australian teen is recovering after tiny creatures – likely sea lice – attacked his legs at a beach in Brighton, a Melbourne suburb.

According to a report by the Guardian and the Australian Associated Press, 16-year-old Sam Kanizay of Melbourne went to the beach Saturday to soak his legs after a soccer game. But when he got out of the water 30 minutes later, his legs were numb, bloody and "covered in what his family said were tiny marine creatures eating his legs," the article said.

Sam's father, Jarrod Kanizay, took Sam to the hospital for the wounds, which the teen described to 3AW as "hundreds of little pin-sized bites" on his feet and ankles.

"There was a massive pool of blood on the floor," Jarrod Kanizay said, adding that "no one" at the hospital "knows what the creatures are." 

Marine experts say parasitic sea lice may be to blame.

>> Read more trending news

"They're scavengers who'll clean up dead fish and feed on living tissue," University of Melbourne marine biologist Michael Keough told The Age. "They're mostly less than a centimeter long, and so the bites they make are pretty small, and so that's more consistent with pinprick size marks."

He added: "It's just food for them. Especially if he's been standing around for a long time, it's the chance for more of them to come in and start biting. Just be attracted to a little bit of blood. And if he's standing in the water and he's cold and may not notice a whole lot of little bites."

University of New South Wales Associate Professor Alistair Poore, an authority on marine invertebrates, echoed the sentiment.

"If it is sea lice, then it is a pretty dramatic example of it," he told the Guardian.

In an effort to solve the mystery, Jarrod Kanizay said he returned to the spot where his son was attacked and caught some of the creatures using a net filled with meat. He then recorded the creatures eating the meat in a now-viral – and nauseating – video.

>> See the clip here (WARNING: Graphic content.)

Read more here or here.

Sea Lice and the Rash They Cause

Vladimir Putin bares chest, goes spearfishing

Published: Saturday, August 05, 2017 @ 8:40 AM

Vladimir Putin - Fast Facts

Russian president Vladimir Putin took a short vacation to begin August, heading to Tuva in southern Siberia to fish, swim and catch some rays.

In images and footage released by Russian state television, Putin and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu can be seen enjoying the outdoors, The Associated Press reports. Putin is seen swimming and fishing, including spending two hours hunting a pike while spearfishing.

>> Read more trending news

Most of the images of Putin feature him bare-chested, except for the photos where Putin dons a wetsuit.

Putin is known for his love of adventure and the outdoors, and has taken active vacations since becoming Russia's president, The Associated Press reports.

In this photo released by Kremlin press service on Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017, Russian President Vladimir Putin holds a fish he caught while fishing during a mini-break in the Siberian Tyva region, a few days ago.(Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)