Activist warns: 'Days of eating Pacific Ocean fish are over'

Published: Sunday, September 01, 2013 @ 1:48 PM
Updated: Sunday, September 01, 2013 @ 1:48 PM

The aftershock of Japan’s disastrous earthquake and tsunami can still be felt by the continuous cleanup at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Two years of nuclear runoff spilling into the ocean have caused environmental activist Joe Martino to warn: “Your days of eating Pacific Ocean fish are over.

His choice words on the activist website Collective Evolution are quantified in this infographic compiled by German researchers at GEOMAR. The animation shows the dispersion of Cesium-137, a radioactive byproduct, will reach every corner of the Pacific by the year 2020. (Via GEOMAR)

Martino’s claim comes after the latest numbers by the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, show more than 300 tons of contaminated water seep into the Pacific Ocean each day. 

NHK News confirms: “A low wall surrounds tanks at reactor No. 4. Workers found a puddle forming just outside it. Officials with Tokyo Electric Power Company says the water in one of the tanks dropped from 1,000 to 700 tons.”

Martino clarifies the severity of the new numbers, saying, “To give you an idea of how bad that actually is, Japanese experts estimate Fukushima’s fallout at 20-30 times as high as as the Hiroshima and Nagasaki nuclear bombings in 1945.” (Via Collective Evolution)

March 11, 2013, marked the two-year anniversary of the disaster. And while activists like Martino recount new numbers that continue to grow, other voices like energy consultant Mycle Schneider are asking for a call to action.

On Friday, he wrote in CNN saying even Japan’s top brass see the slow-paced cleanup as “careless” and “shocking.” (Via CNN)

So to save Japan’s coast and fishing community, Schneider says Fukushima “needs international help.” He proposes global liaisons compile a task force to hold Japan accountable for the cleanup.

However, Japan’s domestic problems could also be to blame for standstill. A report Friday from Bloomberg reveals clashes between Japan’s deep fishing culture and TEPCO aren’t making things move faster.

Currently, fishermen are butting heads with the Japanese energy company over a pipeline that could divert inland groundwater away from the Fukushima disaster area. This could possibly cut the amount of contaminated water reaching the Pacific by 25 percent, but Japan’s fisheries have yet to sign off on the deal. They worry the plan will spread radioactive water to clean areas. (Via Bloomberg)

With a limited supply of seafood, no one might hurt more than Japan’s population. The country imports more seafood than any other. Data from the United Nations shows 6 percent of the world’s fish harvest is eaten in Japan. Its citizens make up 2 percent of the global population.

- See more at Newsy.com

Manchester attack: What we know about suspected suicide bomber Salman Abedi 

Published: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 @ 12:39 PM
Updated: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 @ 3:44 PM

British authorities on Tuesday identified the suicide bomber believed to have blown himself up outside an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, as 22-year-old Salman Abedi.

>> Read more trending news

Greater Manchester police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins confirmed Abedi’s identity Tuesday but declined to comment further, citing the need for the coroner to confirm the identity.

Authorities said Abedi detonated a suicide bomb near one of the entrances to the Manchester Arena on Monday, just after an Ariana Grande concert wrapped up. The attack killed 22 people and injured 59 others, officials said.

Here’s what we know:

Abedi was a British man of Libyan origin who was born in 1994Politico Europe reported. His parents were emigrants who settled in England and later moved back to Libya, The Telegraph reported. He was the second youngest of four children.

Police were warned about Abedi’s “extreme and violent views” several years before Monday’s deadly bombing, according to BBC News.

A Muslim community worker, who was not identified, told the news station that two people who knew Abedi from college called police separately to warn authorities that “he was supporting terrorism.”

The community worker told BBC News that the calls were made about five years ago after Abedi said, among other things, that “being a suicide bomber was OK.”

Police declined to comment on the claim.

Abedi’s “links with ISIS are proven,” France’s Interior Minister said Wednesday, according to Politico Europe.

He traveled to Libya before Monday’s attack and had links with the Islamic State group, Politico Europe reported, citing French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb.

“Today, we only know what British investigators have told us – someone of British nationality, of Libyan origin, who suddenly after a trip to Libya, then probably to Syria, becomes radicalized and decides to carry out this attack,” Collomb told BFMTV.

Abedi lived at a home 3.5 miles from Manchester Arena, according to The New York Times. A law enforcement official told the newspaper that Abedi's ID was found at the scene of the bombing.

Police arrested two of Abedi's brothers and his father in the aftermath of the attack, according to multiple reports.

Anti-terrorism officials in Libya told The Associated Press that Abedi’s father, Ramadan Abedi, was arrested Wednesday for interrogation. One of Salman Abedi’s brothers, Hashim, was arrested Tuesday in Libya on suspicion of having links with the Islamic State group, according to BBC News. Another of Salman Abedi’s brothers, Ismail, was arrested Tuesday in Manchester.

Rouhani wins re-election as Iran’s president

Published: Saturday, May 20, 2017 @ 5:19 AM

According to state TV, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, left , has won re-election, defeating Seyed Ebrahim Raisi, a former attorney general.
Kyodo News/Kyodo News via Getty Images

According to state television, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has won re-election, CNN reported Saturday. Rouhani defeated conservative challenger Ebrahim Raisi.

>> Read more trending news 

"The National Media (IRINN) congratulate the victory of Mr. Hassan Rouhani in the presidential election," Iranian state media channel IRINN announced in an on-screen news ticker.

Rouhani won 57 percent of the vote, or 23,549, 616 votes, Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli said.

Rouhani, a moderate, was a key architect of the 2015 nuclear deal with the United States, the European Union and other partners and his first term was marked by an emergent international engagement.

More than 40 million Iranian voters flocked to polling stations Friday, and by Saturday morning more than 25 million votes had been counted, according to the head of Iran's Interior Ministry State Elections Committee.

No sitting President has failed to win a second term since 1981 and Rouhani's engagement with the outside world resonated with voters who have disliked the country's isolation., CNN reported.

Sale of dog meat reportedly banned at controversial Yulin festival

Published: Thursday, May 18, 2017 @ 10:18 AM

Every year thousands of animals are slaughtered and sold for their meat at a controversial festival in Yulin, China that marks the summer solstice. 

Now, authorities have reportedly banned the sale of dog meat at the festival. The ban was confirmed by Chinese activists and several meat traders.

>> RELATED: Dog, cat meat banned in Taiwan

While eating dog meat has been a tradition in China for hundreds of years, the Yulin festival was only created in 2010 to boost sales.

The ban will reportedly start on June 15, just a few days before the festival begins.

Princess to give up royal status to marry commoner

Published: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 @ 7:48 AM

A Japanese princess is deciding love over royalty. 

Princess Mako, who is the oldest granddaughter of Emperor Akihito, will marry her former college classmate and in doing so, will become a commoner after the ceremony.

>> Read more trending news 

The princess’ now-fiance, Kei Komuro, was sighted as he left the law office where he works, but would not speak to reporters other than to say, “Now is not the time for me to comment, but I want to speak at the right time.”

Currently there are four people in line for the throne: Akihito’s two sons who are in their 50s, his brother who is in his 80s and his 10-year-old grandson, The Telegraph reported.

Mako graduated from International Christian university and went on to get a masters degree from the University of Leicester. She has been working as a museum researcher.

No wedding date has been set, but the official announcement of an impending marriage has a ritual behind it. 

First a public announcement will be made, then a date will be set, and finally the couple will make a formal report to the emperor and empress, The Telegraph reported.