UPDATE


Welcome to winter! Major below-normal cold swing begins this week

Published: Monday, December 04, 2017 @ 1:24 PM

The Storm Center 7 team has a detailed look at what the 2017-18 winter will be like.

Welcome to winter. I know you are probably thinking … wait, doesn’t it officially begin in another two weeks? Well, technically, yes.

However, meteorological winter actually arrived on Dec. 1. This is because meteorologists consider the three calendar months with the lowest average temperatures to be meteorological winter.

Created by WHIO Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell

5 Fast Car Tricks for Winter Weather

But whatever the calendar may say, temperatures are on their way down and likely won’t rise much, if any, through at least mid-December. The average high temperature in early December is in the lower 40s, and we will likely drop to at least 10 degrees below normal by this weekend as a piece of the polar vortex drops southward into the Hudson Bay area of Canada.

READ MORE: After a busy November, what can we expect from December weather?

At the same time, a large area of high pressure will build across the North Atlantic near Greenland. This blocking area of high pressure will force cold air that is building from the North Pole into northern Canada and southward across the eastern half of the United States.

Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell breaks down the 3 different types of Winter Weather Alerts.

The block can cause the polar vortex to weaken and even splinter into “spokes” that can get pushed southward toward the U.S.-Canadian border. Such patterns lead to some of the coldest temperatures of the year in Ohio, especially in the months of January and February. While the air that is now moving into the Miami Valley will be quite cold, it will not be as extreme as it could be if the same pattern were to occur again in about four to six weeks.

If the long-range models are correct, the pattern now developing will likely hold through mid-December. This will keep temperatures well below average with occasional bouts of snow showers and/or flurries. Such patterns often don’t lead to major precipitation events, although clipper-type systems are common. These “Alberta Clippers” will bring gusty winds, rapid temperature swings and a couple of inches of snow at most. Such a system may be on track to move into the Ohio Valley this weekend with perhaps another one passing early next week.

READ MORE: Colder, snowier winter likely in 2017

The bigger question will be if such a pattern will hold into the holiday week of Christmas, which is still just too far away to know for sure. While chances appear to be better than average (typically about 30 percent) for a white Christmas, there are some signs that the blocking pattern may begin to break down right around that time.

Eric Elwell is WHIO StormCenter 7 Chief Meteorologist. Contact him at eric.elwell@coxinc.com or follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Miami Valley native discusses Alaska earthquake experience 

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 2:14 PM

AP Photo Contributed
AP Photo Contributed

A 7.9 magnitude earthquake off the coast of Alaska forced families to evacuate their homes last night around 4:30 a.m. local time. 

News Center 7’s Lauren Clark spoke with a Tipp City native who is now living in Anchorage and felt the effects of the quake in her home.

RELATED: See more trending stories on WHIO.com

“The bed started to move a little bit, and I looked over at my doorway and the door was swinging,” said Miami Valley native Katherine Krupa.

Krupa moved to Alaska three years ago with her husband who is an army Lieutenant General. 

When my husband said, "Oh, we're going to Alaska.”  “I just never thought about earthquakes,” stated Krupa.

Krupa has since learned that earthquakes are a regular occurrence in Alaska, which is located in the Ring of Fire. 

The Krupa’s home was not damaged, but friends of theirs were forced to leave their home and seek higher ground after Tsunami warnings.

Lauren Clark’s full interview with the Tipp City native will be on News Center 7 beginning at 5 p.m. 

Inspiration for 'Rosie the Riveter,' Naomi Parker Fraley, dies

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 1:31 PM

File - In this Oct. 31, 2007 file photo, a poster showing signatures of former Rosie the Riveter's is seen at the offices of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historic Park in Richmond, Calif. A woman identified by a scholar as the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, the iconic female World War II factory worker, has died in Washington state. The New York Times reports that Naomi Parker Fraley died Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Longview. She was 96. Multiple women have been identified over the years as possible models for Rosie, but a Seton Hall University professor in 2016 focused on Fraley as the true inspiration. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Eric Risberg/AP
File - In this Oct. 31, 2007 file photo, a poster showing signatures of former Rosie the Riveter's is seen at the offices of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historic Park in Richmond, Calif. A woman identified by a scholar as the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, the iconic female World War II factory worker, has died in Washington state. The New York Times reports that Naomi Parker Fraley died Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Longview. She was 96. Multiple women have been identified over the years as possible models for Rosie, but a Seton Hall University professor in 2016 focused on Fraley as the true inspiration. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)(Eric Risberg/AP)

The woman who many believe empowered housewives to leave their kitchens and enter the workplace left empty when men went to fight in World War II has died.

Naomi Parker Fraley was discovered in 2015 to have been the inspiration for the “Rosie the Riveter” poster tha decades earlier had become the symbol in which women realized “We Can Do It.”

>> Read more trending news 

Fraley was a factory worker at Alameda Naval Station when a photographer asked to take her photo. With her hair in a bandana, just like the poster, Fraley is believed to be the starting point for the artist’s representation of women taking over what had been a men’s world, CNN reported.

Fraley was only 20 years old and was working with her 18-year-old sister at the time of the war, KATU reported.

She realized it was her photo that helped started the movement during a convention of women WWII factory workers. Her photo was labeled as the poster’s inspiration. Originally the photo was identified as that of Geraldine Hoff Doyle, but years of research confirmed in 2015 it was Fraley in the photo instead, CNN reported.

The man who made the identification, Dr. James Kimble, said of Fraley, “She didn't’ think she did anything special. A lot of women did what she did. She just wanted her picture corrected,” CNN reported.

Fraley died in Longview, Washington, Saturday, the BBC reported. She was 96.

Employers to recruit at Springfield job fair

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 8:05 AM

FILE
FILE

Local employers like CareSource and Assurant will be recruiting in Springfield this Friday.

CareSource Life Services is holding a job fair 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday at the Faith United Methodist Church at 102 W. High St.

RELATED: Dayton Children’s plans career fair

Life coaching, job readiness training and resume support will be available.

Some of the employers who will be there include:

Assurant

CareSource

Interim Healthcare

Mama Rosa’s

Ohio State Highway Patrol

RTA

Vocalink

I-Supply

The Greentree Group

Klosterman Bakery

Securitas

2 killed, several injured in shooting at Kentucky high school; 15-year-old in custody

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 9:39 AM
Updated: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 1:47 PM

VIDEO: Shooting Reported At Kentucky High School

Two teenagers died Tuesday morning after a 15-year-old student at Kentucky’s Marshall County High School opened fire on campus, authorities said at a news conference.

>> Read more trending news

Officials did not identify the suspected shooter, who police said walked into the school just before 8 a.m., armed with a handgun. He shot 14 people before being stopped by a deputy with the Marshall County Sheriff’s Office, according to Kentucky State Police.

He was in police custody on Tuesday afternoon. State Police Commissioner Rick Sanders said he will likely face charges of murder and attempted murder.

“It’s a tragic day for all of us,” Sanders said. “I would just assure you of one thing: We in law enforcement will do our job and do it well, and we will pray for the families that are affected.”

Gov. Matt Bevin said a total of 19 people were injured in Tuesday’s attack, 14 of which were shot. Five other people suffered unspecified, non-gunshot related injuries, he said.

Authorities found a 15-year-old student dead at the scene of the shooting when they arrived just after 8 a.m. A second victim, a 15-year-old male, died at a hospital, Bevin said.

Earlier Tuesday, Bevin called the shooting "a tremendous tragedy" in a statement posted on Twitter. 

"It is unbelievable that this would happen in a small, close-knit community like Marshall County," he said. "As there is still so much unknown, I encourage people to love on each other at this time. Do not speculate, but come alongside each other in support and allow the facts to come out."