WEEKEND WEATHER: Chance for SNOW and COLD!

Published: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 @ 6:38 AM

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini looks at how cold we stay and when we could see some snow showers this weekend.

Are you ready for bone-chilling cold and snow? The cold is here and we could see snow this weekend.

>>Track snow with LIVE Interactive DOPPLER 7 RADAR

It’s not uncommon to have outbreaks of arctic air this time of year, said Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini.

December, meteorologically speaking, is the beginning of winter and the winter solstice will also arrive in just a few weeks.

>>Your personal county forecast, click here

A negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation is allowing very cold air to spill into the Miami Valley and stay through the middle of December. This means any storm systems or disturbances this week will have temperatures cold enough to support snow, Zontini said.

WHEN YOU MIGHT SEE SNOW THIS WEEKEND:

A piece of upper-level energy will enter the Miami Valley Saturday and bring the chance for snow showers. The timing looks to impact the morning and afternoon hours.

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini said there isn't much moisture so accumulations will be light — likely less than an inch.

You can track it moving in yourself if you have our free WHIO Weather App.  It gives you access to LIVE Doppler 7 Radar anytime, anywhere. It’s LOCAL forecast information, not forecasts from a national app. Take a tour of the apps features and see what it can do for yourself. 

Looking at the past, the Dayton International Airport usually sees the first measurable snow — a tenth of an inch or more — at the end of November. This year we got a little snow around that time.

The first inch of snow at the airport is usually around December 7.

Since temperatures will stay so cold over the week, the chance this weekend for some slick spots on the roads will be something to watch for late Saturday afternoon and evening.

Shutdown: Air Force museum closes: Wright-Patt workers face furlough

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 11:32 AM
Updated: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 3:12 PM

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force closed Saturday after initially opening in the morning in the midst of a federal government shutdown.

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force closed Saturday after initially opening in the morning in the midst of a federal government shutdown.

Hundreds of people had trekked inside the world’s largest military aviation museum Saturday morning before the closure at 1 p.m.

The fallout was the latest from the federal closure expected to affect thousands of workers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the largest single-site employer in Ohio with an estimated 27,000 military and civilian personnel.

RELATED: Wright Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown still in place

Wright-Patt employees were told to report to work Monday for further instructions on “shutdown activities,” but it was not yet known how many would be furloughed if the partial federal closure continued into the work week.

National Park Service interpretive centers near Huffman Prairie where the Wright brothers perfected the airplane, and the Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center in Dayton, were among NPS sites closed Saturday in the region because of the shutdown, although the two properties were open to traffic.

What’s next for the base?

More fallout was expected Monday if the shutdown persists into the work week.

As of Friday, base officials did not have an estimate of how many Wright-Patterson civil service workers might be furloughed. All military personnel, and some civilian employees deemed in “essential” jobs, would be exempt from being sent home temporarily, but would not be paid until Congress passes an appropriations bill, according to the Pentagon.

When the last shutdown struck in 2013, both furloughed workers and those who stayed on the job were reimbursed.

Base authorities have not released further details of the full scope of what might be impacted at Wright-Patterson.

The Child Development Center was scheduled to be open Monday, spokeswoman Marie Vanover said Saturday.

Col. Alden Hilton, commander of the Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine which marked its 100th anniversary Friday, said essential classes to train aeromedical flight personnel would continue without interruption.

Hundreds of Air Force reservists scheduled for a monthly drill weekend Jan. 20-21 with the 445th Airlift Wing were expected to proceed because it was previously funded, said Lt. Col. Cynthia Harris, a unit spokeswoman.

Museum to remain closed

Matthew and Leigh Boyce, a married couple, traveled from St. Louis to the Air Force museum hoping it was open despite a partial federal government shutdown that struck midnight Saturday when Congress failed to pass a short-term stopgap funding measure.

RELATED: Government shutdown now official; Political parties blame each other

“We came into town to see our daughter and this was obviously one of the things we wanted to go to, but we were worried after we heard the news that we weren’t going to be able to get in,” Boyce, 46, said as he and his wife, Leigh, stood in the newest gallery housing iconic presidential planes and one-of-a-kind experimental jets.

“We checked the website that said it might be a possibility that it would not be open because of the shutdown, and we called this morning and they said they didn’t know whether they were even going to be open, but they suggested we come and see,” he added.

A museum spokeswoman said in an email late Friday the museum planned to stay open this weekend until it received a federal order to shut down. On Saturday, the museum indicated it would remain closed until the shutdown has ended.

Steven Wright said he was part of a group with a Cub Scout pack that drove four-and-a-half hours Saturday from Pittsburgh, Pa., only to discover the museum closed.

“It would have been nice to have known, but we didn’t even think to check on that,” he said.

The political drama over the failure of Congress and the White House to prevent a shutdown because of a lapse in a temporary funding frustrated Boyce.

RELATED: Government shutdown: How will you be impacted

“Our entire government causes me frustration,” he said. “It’s a little ridiculous that things like this get used as pawns in political games.”

WHIO-TV’s Malik Perkins contributed to this story.

Dayton detective fires shots; no injuries in Salem Avenue incident

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 1:02 PM

Salem Ave Police Shootout

UPDATE @ 2:05 p.m.

Two people are in custody following an officer-involved shooting late this morning in the 3500 block of Salem Avenue.

No one was injured, and the coroner’s office did not respond to the scene, despite earlier reports.

Law enforcement responded to the area of Lev’s Pawn Shop, 3351 Salem Ave. in Harrison Twp.

Dayton police Maj. Eric Henderson said there were reports that a vehicle was spotted there that may have been involved in an aggravated burglary in Riverside, and that the suspects may have been trying to pawn weapons stolen in that incident.

“While approaching this vehicle there was immediate threat and officers discharged several rounds,” he said.

No one was injured when the Dayton detective fired his service weapon.

There are two, possibly three people in custody, Henderson said. The names and potential charges have not been released.

The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident, Henderson said.

Riverside is investigating the aggravated burglary in its jurisdiction, and the Dayton Police Department is handling its own administrative investigation, police said.

FIRST REPORT

Yellow crime scene tape surrounded Lev’s Pawn Shop this afternoon as part of a police investigation.

Two people were seen in the back of a police cruiser.

Officers were called at 10:47 p.m. by Riverside police to the pawn shop, 3551 Salem Ave., in Harrison Twp., according to the Montgomery County Regional Dispatch Center. No information was available on what led police there.

>> 2 arrested in armed robbery at Springfield Verizon store

A witness at the scene told our crew on scene that the incident began as a robbery, but dispatch did not confirm that report.

(JEFF BROWN / STAFF)
We are on scene and will update this report as we learn details.

Crowded governor field puts Democratic race up for grabs

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 2:51 PM
Updated: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 2:51 PM

Akron City Councilwoman Tara Samples (left) and former U.S. Representative Dennis Kucinich talk to the media after Kucinich announced Samples as his running mate for Ohio governor at the Burning Bush church Friday, Jan. 19, 2017. Karen Schiely/The Akron Beacon Journal
Akron City Councilwoman Tara Samples (left) and former U.S. Representative Dennis Kucinich talk to the media after Kucinich announced Samples as his running mate for Ohio governor at the Burning Bush church Friday, Jan. 19, 2017. Karen Schiely/The Akron Beacon Journal

Nobody denies the Democratic field of candidates running for Ohio governor is crowded.

But the whether that is a good thing for the party — and its fortunes in November — depends on how the five candidates behave, according to political experts and party officials.

“I am not sure we can assume that a tight primary will damage a candidate for a general election unless the party emerges fractured,” said Mark Caleb Smith, director of the Center for Political Studies at Cedarville College.

Assuming no one drops out — or suddenly appears — by the Feb. 7 filing deadline, Democratic voters will chose among five candidates, two of whom have strong statewide name recognition.

FILE - In this July 19, 2011, file photo, Rep. Betty Sutton, D-Ohio takes part in a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington to discuss their support for a bill. Former federal consumer watchdog Richard Cordray is joining forces with former congresswoman and Obama-era official Sutton in the Ohio governor's race as Democrats position to win back the key battleground state in November.(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

RELATED: Hamilton businessman tapped to run with Mary Taylor in governor race

Dennis Kucinich, a former U.S. congressman and former Cleveland mayor, joined the race on Wednesday. Kucinich has twice run for president, but has been out of Congress since 2012, after Republican-led redistricting combined his Cleveland-area district with the one held by Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Toledo. Kaptur defeated Kucinich in the Democratic primary.

Ohio Gov. candidate Joe Schiavoni and his running mate Stephanie Dodd(Staff Writer)

Richard Cordray was also a late entry in the Democratic race, joining it in November after leaving his job as director of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Cordray has twice won statewide elections — once for Ohio treasurer and once for attorney general. He lost to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine in 2010. President Barack Obama then picked him to lead the consumer protection bureau.

RELATED: Richard Cordray brings governor campaign to Dayton

Former Ohio Rep. Connie Pillich of Cincinnati, state Sen. Joe Schiavoni of Boardman, and Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill are also in the running. Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley was in the race but dropped out and said she would support Cordray. Former U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton withdrew her candidacy after Cordray picked her to be his running mate.

Kucinich on Friday selected Akron councilwoman Tara Samples to join him on the ticket.

Narrowed Republican field

There are just two candidates left on the Republican side: DeWine and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor. The field narrowed when DeWine tapped Secretary of State Jon Husted to be his running mate. Husted had been running for the top job. Then Rep. Jim Renacci changed races and said he would run for the Senate instead of governor after Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel abandoned his bid for that office, attributing the decision to his wife’s health.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Bill O’Neill, left, introduces his running mate, Chantelle E. Lewis, an elementary school principal in Lorain County.(Facebook)(Columbus bureau)

Smith says DeWine is the frontrunner in the race and has what he called the “experience edge.” Taylor, who has been in state government since 2003, has taken aim at what she calls “career politicians,” hoping perhaps to borrow from the winning strategy employed by President Donald Trump in Ohio in 2016. She picked Cincinnati businesman Nathan Estruth to be her running mate.

RELATED: DeWine-Husted ticket called governor’s race ‘dream team’ by GOP state senator

“In many ways the Ohio GOP has been ground zero for a Trump-Kasich proxy war,” said Lee Hannah, assistant professor of political science at Wright State University. “I think that could continue into the primaries although I’m not really sure that Taylor and Estruth can keep up with DeWine and Husted’s fundraising,”

No cake walk

Christopher Devine, assistant professor of political science at the University of Dayton, sees Cordray as the frontrunner in the Democratic race and said the primary will give him a chance to knock off some rust since he hasn’t run for office since 2010.

Connie Pillich is the lone woman remaining in the Democratic field for governor. She picked Marion Mayor Scott Schertzer to be her running mate Thursday. Photo by Jay LaPrete, Associated Press.(Columbus bureau)

RELATED: O’Neill’s boast of sexual liaisons brings calls for his resignation

But it’s far from a cake walk. Kucinich has strong name identification and a working class back story. Pillich is a lawyer, has an Air Force background and is the lone woman in the field. Schiavoni has a strong following in northeast Ohio, a part of the state crucial for any Democrat to win. And O’Neill, while perhaps best described as a wild card, has made enough controversial statements to draw headlines from one end of the state to the other —if nothing else, putting his name before voters.

RELATED: Pillich picks Marion mayor as running mate in governor’s race

Senate Republicans have started a process to remove him from the Supreme Court for campaigning while on the bench.

David Pepper, chairman of the Ohio Democratic Party, says he is staying neutral. The party is holding candidate debates open to any of the Democrats willing to be vetted by the party. Only O’Neill has refused to be vetted, according to Pepper.

Pepper said his goal is to have an energetic, transparent primary and he sees it as a plus that five people and their running mates will be scouring the state for votes and preaching the Democratic message. When it’s over, he expects everyone to unite around the candidate who wins.

“The first thing we need to do is make sure the core Democrats are energized about our candidates,” he said.

RELATED: Democrat Kucinich picks running mate in Ohio governor’s race

RELATED: Kucinich launches governor bid

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Arizona mother who gave toddler fatal meth dose receives 20-year prison sentence

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 2:44 PM

File image of a courtroom.
Jason Morrison/Freeimages
File image of a courtroom.(Jason Morrison/Freeimages)

An Arizona woman who gave her toddler a fatal dose of methamphetamine in 2016 was sentenced Friday to 20 years in prison.

>> Read more trending news 

Natalie Russell, 30, pleaded guilty last month to second-degree murder and child abuse, azcentral.com reported. Russell claimed she gave her 22-month-old daughter meth to counteract the effects of methadone. The child had accidentally ingested methadone that was left in an open container, Russell allegedly told police. Officials said Russell failed to get her daughter medical assistance.

Several friends and family members attended Russell's sentencing at the Maricopa County Superior Court, azcenteral.com reported. Russell's supporters said they forgave her for her actions. Russell maintains that she never meant to harm her daughter, and her actions were driven by her drug addiction.