The Latest: Another Wells Fargo CEO faces an angry Congress

Published: Tuesday, October 03, 2017 @ 11:06 AM
Updated: Tuesday, October 03, 2017 @ 11:04 AM

The Latest on Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan's testimony before Congress (all times local):

11:30 a.m.

Some U.S. Senators questioning Wells Fargo's CEO say an auto insurance scandal is an example of how the bank's culture hasn't changed.

Wells Fargo acknowledged earlier this year that it signed up tens of thousands of auto loan customers up for insurance they did not need, and some of those customers who could not afford the auto insurance had their cars repossessed.

That came after a scandal over millions of accounts created without customer knowledge as bank employees tried to meet aggressive sales targets.

Sen. Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat from Maryland, said "it was amazing" for Wells Fargo to claim it puts customers first when people's cars were repossessed.

And Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, a Democrat from North Dakota, expressed anger about the auto insurance scandal as well as the sales practices scandal. She said bank executives promise to look into situations and promise they care about customers. But she said, "I do not hear a level of cultural change that satisfies me today."

11 a.m.

A year later, it appears Congress remains united on at least one thing: its anger at Wells Fargo over a sales practices scandal.

Senators on both sides of the aisle expressed their continuing disappointment Tuesday as CEO Tim Sloan appeared before them, wondering whether one of the nation's largest consumer banks has truly changed its culture a year after the sales practices were exposed.

Wells Fargo has said that 3.5 million accounts were potentially opened without customers' permission between 2009 and 2016, as employees tried to meet ambitious sales targets. Sloan's predecessor, John Stumpf, testified twice in front of Congress last fall and the scandal cost him his job.

Senator Tim Scott, a Republican from South Carolina, said, "We are irritated at Wells Fargo. Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, a vocal critic of Wells Fargo, called for Sloan's firing. She said, "At best you were incompetent, at worst you were complicit," in the sales practices.

1 a.m.

Wells Fargo's chief executive will face Congress saying the bank remains "deeply sorry" for its previous sales practices, and that in the year since the scandal over them exploded it has substantially changed for the better.

The prepared comments from Tim Sloan come ahead of his scheduled appearance in front of the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday, about a year since his predecessor did the same and was grilled about the sales practices.

Wells Fargo has said that 3.5 million accounts were potentially opened without customers' permission between 2009 and 2016, as employees tried to meet ambitious sales targets. The scandal was the biggest in Wells Fargo's history. Sloan's predecessor, John Stumpf, testified twice in front of Congress last fall.

Can you find the camouflaged soldier hidden in this viral photo?

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 2:53 AM

Can you find the camouflaged soldier hidden in this viral photo? (Photo credit: British Army / Twitter)
British Army / Twitter
Can you find the camouflaged soldier hidden in this viral photo? (Photo credit: British Army / Twitter)(British Army / Twitter)

The British Army wants you to test its woodland camouflage. Do you see a soldier in this image?

>> See the tweet here

The British Army asked Twitter users to scan the photo — which reportedly was shot in Wales on the Section Commander’s Battle Course — to find the soldier in the scene.

>> Read more trending news 

A hint, in case you’re having any difficulty: The soldier is not standing up.

To make things a bit difficult, the soldier is wearing a woodland camouflage pattern designed to blend in with the misty forest terrain.

>> This coffee riddle has baffled the internet – can you solve it?

Is the British uniform good enough for you? If you haven’t found the answer yet, it’s here — the soldier lying prone, enveloped in mist, with just the perfectly round helmet giving any indication that it’s not all forest floor.

>> Click here or scroll down to see the answer
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Teen trying to kill bed bug starts fire, causes $300,000 in damage, firefighters say

Published: Thursday, November 30, 2017 @ 12:27 PM

Teen Starts Fire, Causes $300,000 In Damage Trying To Kill Bed Bug

A Cincinnati teen trying to kill a bed bug is accused of starting a fire in his apartment complex that caused $300,000 in damage and displaced eight residents. 

WCPO in Cincinnati reported that the 13-year-old boy tried to kill the pest by lighting it on fire. His mattress burst into flames, and the fire spread to the building’s attic.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze, but one apartment was destroyed. Two other units had fire damage, and two others were damaged by smoke and water.

Three adults and five children were displaced by the incident, the news station reported. Firefighters said the American Red Cross was assisting the residents. 

>> Read more trending news

Bed bugs are flat, reddish-brown insects that feed on the blood of humans or animals. According to pest control company Orkin, they are usually found in cracks and crevices, including mattress seams, sheets and furniture. They also hide behind baseboards and in electrical plate outlets. 

They are often found in hotels because they can travel easily in luggage, purses and briefcases, the company’s website said

Signs of an infestation include not only the bugs, which are about the size of an apple seed, but also the empty skins that young bed bugs shed as they grow. They also leave behind their droppings. 

Homeowners may also discover bites on their bodies when they wake up. Bed bugs prefer to be active at night, when their hosts are asleep, Orkin said

Another home burns down in botched attempt to kill bedbugs with rubbing alcohol

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 1:57 AM

What You Need to Know: Bed Bugs

Three people were hospitalized and 10 are homeless after a Cincinnati woman attempted to douse a bedbug infestation in her home with rubbing alcohol and started a house fire instead, authorities said.

>> Teen trying to kill bedbug starts fire, causes $300,000 in damage, firefighters say

The rubbing alcohol — which is extremely flammable — ignited because of a nearby open flame, according to authorities cited by the New York Post. The ensuing fire caused $250,000 in damage to the five-unit multi-family Ohio home.

Three people had to be hospitalized for smoke inhalation, according to CBS News. Their injuries are not considered life-threatening.

For now, the American Red Cross is assisting and providing housing for those displaced by the inferno, WXIX reported.

>> Read more trending news

This is the second time that a rubbing-alcohol-fueled fire has burned down a Cincinnati house in as many months. Just after Thanksgiving, a 19-year-old lit a match after dousing a bedbug in rubbing alcohol, causing a fire that did $300,000 in damage to six apartments and left eight people homeless.

Cincinnati District 3 Fire Chief Randy Freel told WXIX that people should stay away from any home remedies for bedbugs, especially the more flammable kinds.

“Get a professional,” he said.

Read more here.

Teen Starts Fire, Causes $300,000 In Damage Trying To Kill Bed Bug

Pregnant woman fatally shot by boyfriend trying to end relationship, police say

Published: Sunday, December 10, 2017 @ 11:39 PM

A man fatally shot his pregnant girlfriend in an attempt to end the relationship, police say. (Photo: Fox13Memphis.com)
A man fatally shot his pregnant girlfriend in an attempt to end the relationship, police say. (Photo: Fox13Memphis.com)

A man fatally shot his pregnant girlfriend Saturday in an attempt to end the relationship, police said.

>> Read more trending news

Keosha Miller, 22, was shot around around 6:59 p.m. in the Faronia Square Townhomes, Memphis police said. 

Brandon Freeman was seen by witnesses, fleeing the residence at a high rate of speed, police said. The witnesses called Freeman to check and see if he was OK. He told them "some random guys tried to shoot he and his girlfriend."

Freeman later returned to the scene and moved evidence there, police said. 

Freeman later admitted to police that he shot and killed Miller because he was unsure if she was pregnant with his baby and it was the easiest way he could think of to get out of the relationship.

“There are a number of things you could’ve done to get out of that relationship. You got abortion and a number of things other than taking a baby’s life,” a neighbor said. 

Memphis police told FOX13 that Miller was three months pregnant when she was shot and killed by Freeman. The fetus did not survive the shooting.

Freeman was arrested and charged with first-degree murder; he is scheduled to appear in court on Monday morning.