Storm knocks out power to thousands, damages neighborhood

Published: Saturday, September 08, 2012 @ 4:05 PM
Updated: Saturday, September 08, 2012 @ 4:05 PM

KETTERING — A storm that tore through the region Friday night and early Saturday left hundreds of customers without power and ripped through a Kettering neighborhood, where trees were torn from their roots and several homes were damaged.

At its height, the storm knocked out power to as many as 580 residents in Preble County. According to DP&L, about 150 customers in Montgomery County also lost power, along with more than 50 in Greene County. In all, as many as 5,000 customers were impacted by the storm, according to Kevin Hall, a DP&L spokesman.

Most customers lost power due to blown fuses from lightning, but some transformers were also damaged, Hall said. Power had been restored to all but about 100 customers by Saturday afternoon.

But one Kettering neighborhood may take longer to recover.

Sue Clagg, a Kettering resident whose was home when the storm struck, said it was like something from a movie.

“It looked like branches were swirling out of the air,” she said. “I immediately thought of ‘The Wizard of Oz.”

The storm struck particularly hard in an area that included Eureka Drive, Circle View Drive and Dexter Avenue, just off Wilmington Pike.

Ronald Bradford, who lives in the 1100 block of Dexter, was sleeping on his couch when a tree from across the street was torn from its roots, collapsing the roof of his 2000 Chevy Blazer. The storm sounded like a bomb going off, he said.

“We heard the alarm go off on the truck and I’m thinking, ‘Where’s the truck at?’” Bradford said. “Here it was under the tree.”

The storm blew the a rocking chair off Marissa Andrews’ deck, destroyed her potted plants and left debris scattered throughout her yard.

“It shredded all my flowers and broke all my pots,” said Andrews, who lives in the 1200 block of Eureka.

Two tall pines trees toppled onto the deck and rested on top of two vehicles in front of a home on Hampton Road. Nancy Miro, who lives there with her family, said she was thankful no one was injured.

“It sounded like a train or a jet engine coming up along the side of the house,” Miro said.

Adobe to finally kick Flash to the curb

Published: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 @ 2:16 PM

A window on the Mozilla Firefox browser shows the browser has blocked the Adobe Flash plugin from activating. According to online reports from 2015, Adobe Flash was easily exploitable on several fronts by hackers, who used Flash to gain access to a user's computer. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Sean Gallup/Getty Images
A window on the Mozilla Firefox browser shows the browser has blocked the Adobe Flash plugin from activating. According to online reports from 2015, Adobe Flash was easily exploitable on several fronts by hackers, who used Flash to gain access to a user's computer. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)(Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Are you a frequent user of Adobe’s Flash? If so, it will be time to say goodbye soon, because the company announced that it will get rid of the program by the end of 2020. 

» RELATED: Google launches SOS alerts in Maps and Search to help users during a crisis

The corporation broke the news this week, revealing that its partners - Apple Inc, Microsoft Corp, Alphabet Inc's Google, Facebook Inc and Mozilla Corporation - will phase out support for Flash over the next three years. 

>> Read more trending news

In 2020, Adobe will no longer release updates and browsers will no longer support it. 

The decision comes after Flash’s usage begin to dwindle in 2010 after Apple decided not to use it for iPhones. Since then, more modern applications were created, and Flash continued to suffer. 

» RELATED: Microsoft Paint to be depreciated in next Windows release, could be removed in future

To prepare for the shift, companies are encouraging their developers to work with other programs. 

Flash first launched more than 20 years ago, and many developers used it as a way to create a variety of applications, such as video games, that were able to run on several web browsers.

» RELATED: The new Google Maps tracker will ruin your lies about being late 

Despite the end of Flash, its creators are still proud of its impact. 

“Few technologies have had such a profound and positive impact in the internet era,” Govind Balakrishnan, vice president of product development for Adobe Creative Cloud, told Reuters. “In fact, we think the opportunity for Adobe is greater in a post-Flash world.”

When does school start for area districts and schools?

Published: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 @ 2:16 PM

Back-To-School Do's And Don'ts

Start dates at schools and districts throughout the Miami Valley range from Aug. 2 to Sept. 5.

When does your school or district start? Choose from the dropdown menu below or scan by start date. Schools that have already started are listed at the bottom of the page.

Note: In some schools and districts, some grade levels might start on different dates.

MORE ON SCHOOLS
» Back to school guide for 2017: Everything you need to know
» State makes major changes to graduation requirements for Class of 2018
» Ohioans to get sales tax holiday in August for back-to-school supplies


Coroner can’t determine sex of buried Carlisle baby; hearing delayed

Published: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 @ 9:36 AM
Updated: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 @ 2:03 PM


            Brooke Skylar Richardson, right, and her attorney Charles M. Rittgers appear before Judge Rupert E. Ruppert last Friday during her arraignment hearing in Franklin Municipal Court. Richardson, 18, is charged with reckless homicide for the May death of her baby after its remains were found in the backyard of her home. If convicted of the third-degree felony, she faces one to five years in prison. ED RICHTER/STAFF
Brooke Skylar Richardson, right, and her attorney Charles M. Rittgers appear before Judge Rupert E. Ruppert last Friday during her arraignment hearing in Franklin Municipal Court. Richardson, 18, is charged with reckless homicide for the May death of her baby after its remains were found in the backyard of her home. If convicted of the third-degree felony, she faces one to five years in prison. ED RICHTER/STAFF

UPDATE@1 p.m.:

Warren County’s coroner today said investigators have not been able to determine the sex of the baby found buried in the backyard of a Carlisle home.

The baby’s mother, 18-year-old Brooke Skylar Richardson, a cheerleader who graduated this year from Carlisle High School, faces one count of reckless homicide.

Warren County Coroner Dr. Russell Uptegrove said today that his office was not able to determine the sex of the infant from the remains, which are two months old. The criminal complaint against Richards alleges she caused the infant’s death on or about May 7.

MORE: Investigators search 3 times in 10 days in Carlisle baby remains case

“We may eventually do DNA testing, but we could not determine that (the sex) from the remains,” Uptegrove said.

The sex of the baby has not been released by deputies or the prosecutor.

Also today, the defense attorney for Richardson did not give a reason for seeking a delay in a court hearing scheduled for next week.

Richardson, of Eagle Ridge Drive, was scheduled to appear in Franklin Municipal Court for a preliminary hearing on the charge of reckless homicide. Attorney Charlie M. Rittgers requested a continuance, which was granted by Judge Rupert Ruppert.

The court document obtained by this news outlet gives not reason for the request. Rittgers did however, give a brief statement via email.

MORE: Professor on baby death: Hard to know how common it is

“We agreed to a continuance because we think it is in the best interest of Skylar,” Rittgers said.

The teen is free on $15,000 bond.

The Warren County Sheriff’s Office and Prosecutor David Fornshell have released few facts about the case that began 10 days ago with a call from a doctor’s office to Carlisle police about a possible stillborn baby. The remains were unearth and Richardson was charged with reckless homicide.

Fornshell made it clear that the evidence indicates the baby was born alive.

INITIAL REPORT:

A Franklin judge has continued a preliminary hearing for a Carlisle woman accused of reckless homicide for the May death of her baby after its remains were found in the backyard of her home.

MORE: Warren County buried baby case: 5 things we know now

Franklin Municipal Court officials said that Charles M. Rittgers, the attorney for Brooke Skylar Richardson, 18, filed a motion late Tuesday afternoon to continue the preliminary hearing until 5 p.m. Aug. 8. Judge Rupert Ruppert signed the order Tuesday night after court ended.

Three separate searches in 10 days of a Carlisle house where the remains of an infant were found buried are part of continuing investigation against the mother and anyone else involved in the baby’s death, Warren County Prosecutor David Fornshell said Tuesday.

Richardson, who is free on a $15,000 bond, had been scheduled for a preliminary hearing on Aug. 1 on the third-degree felony charge.

MORE: Could Ohio cheerleader have used safe haven law to give up baby?

Investigators from the Warren County Coroner’s Office and Warren County Sheriff’s Office first went to the Richardson house on July 14, unearthing remains of a baby. They have been back to the Eagle Ridge Drive property twice since, including going inside the house Monday night, gathering more evidence.

“This is an ongoing investigation. We are investigating what happened and who may have been involved,” Fornshell said, adding if that investigation led other others involved, they would be charged.

MORE: Carlisle baby alive at birth, prosecutor says after teen mom in court

Richardson was a cheerleader and had graduated from Carlisle High School this past spring, according to Carlisle School Superintendent Larry Hook. He declined to comment on Richardson, citing privacy laws.

According to the criminal complaint filed against her in Franklin Municipal Court, “On or about May 7, 2017, one Brooke Richardson … did recklessly cause the death of another, or the unlawful termination of another’s pregnancy.”

PREVIOUS REPORT: Anthropologist examining remains of baby found in Carlisle yard

Investigators initially received a tip from a doctor’s office that a Carlisle teenager may have delivered a stillborn infant. Investigators later found an infant’s remains buried in the backyard at the residence in the 100 block of Eagle Ridge Drive.

Staff Writer Lauren Pack contributed to this report.

71-year-old woman takes dog to national park to scatter husband's ashes, ends up stranded for 6 days 

Published: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 @ 2:06 PM

Sajean Geer was stranded in Olympic National Park for six days. (Photo via KIRO7.com)
Sajean Geer was stranded in Olympic National Park for six days. (Photo via KIRO7.com)

After six days of being stranded in Olympic National Park, 71-year-old Sajean Geer and her Chihuahua-terrier mix dog, Yoda, were rescued by a Coast Guard aircrew

>> Read more trending news

Rescuers found the pair around 7:15 p.m. Sunday. Both were fatigued and thirsty, but otherwise reported to be in good health. Geer was taken to the Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, where she was treated and released.

Geer's husband died several months ago. She had scattered half of his ashes in Hawaii and wanted to scatter the other half in his favorite spot in the park -- Obstruction Point.

Geer, of Port Angeles, Washington, said she drove up a dirt road and planned on scattering the ashes and then leaving right away, but after locating the area to scatter her husband's ashes, she realized she was lost and couldn't find her way back to the road.

“I couldn't find the car, I couldn't find the road, and I got really disoriented,” she said.

She said she was upset with herself because she is an experienced hiker, but she knew she wasn't prepared to be in the park for an extended period of time since she had brought her dog with her, was only wearing a Hawaiian shirt and did not have cellphone service.

>> Related: Seniors: Get your $10 lifetime pass for National Parks now before price hike

Geer also said she did not tell anyone where she was going since she didn't intend on being on an extended hike.

A close friend in Hawaii couldn't get in touch with Geer, so she then notified Geer's brother, who called police.

Geer said she spent the first day trying to find her way out of the park, but didn't have any luck. She then made a shelter for herself and Yoda, who helped keep her warm.

She ate pine needles and bugs and descended a steep ravine a few times a day to get water from a stream.

Geer said she is a voracious reader and a few years ago, she read a number of books on survival, which she said helped her immensely in her predicament.

She said she maintained a positive attitude throughout the ordeal and when she eventually heard a helicopter, she stood on a log to wave the crew to her location.