Statistics: More Americans killed by gunshots since 1968 than in all U.S. wars

Published: Friday, October 06, 2017 @ 6:48 AM

Guns stacked in a store.
AFP Contributor/AFP/Getty Images
Guns stacked in a store.(AFP Contributor/AFP/Getty Images)

More Americans have died from gunshots in the past 50 years than have been killed in every U.S. war, NBC News reported.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 1.5 million people have died in gun-related incidents in the U.S.since 1968. By comparison, about 1.2 million service members have been killed in every war in U.S. history, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs and iCasualties.org.

At least 58 people and the gunman died in Sunday's mass shooting in Las Vegas, and hundreds were injured. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

"What we've seen in Las Vegas is an uniquely American scene," former FBI agent Ali Soufan said on MSNBC. "The aftermath of such traumatic events have become an all too familiar scene in our society and in our politics."

Suicide bomber kills 7 in Pakistani church

Published: Sunday, December 17, 2017 @ 7:25 AM

Methodist church in Pakistan.
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Methodist church in Pakistan.(Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Seven people were killed and more than two dozen were injured Sunday when a suicide bomber attacked a church packed with more than 400 worshippers during a service in Pakistan, CNN reported.

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A Methodist church in Quetta was targeted by two attackers, but only one was able to denonate his vest, according to Sarfaraz Bugti, the interior minister of the Balochistan province. The second attacker was shot by a church security guard before he could detonate his explosives, Bugti said.

The civilians were killed during the blast and in the intense firefight that followed, according to Moazzam Jah Ansari, the provincial police chief. 

Wife gets wedding ring back after husband accidentally drops it in Salvation Army kettle

Published: Sunday, December 17, 2017 @ 6:32 AM

Salvation Army kettle.
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Salvation Army kettle.(Scott Olson/Getty Images)

An Oklahoma couple is grateful to the Salvation Army after a wedding ring was accidentally dropped into a donation kettle.

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It happened while one Tulsa man, who asked not to be identified, was dropping some change into the red kettle.

“I had outpatient surgery at St. John's and I forgot to take [the rings] off. So at the last minute, I gave them to him and he put them in his pocket,” the wife said.

The husband did not realize what had happened until after they got back home and he couldn't find the ring in his pocket.

Captain Ken Chapman of the Salvation Army of Metro Tulsa said he received a frantic phone call from the couple asking if the ring was still with them. He said the kettles have a lock on them and stay locked until the counting process begins at the Salvation Army warehouse.

“So we count the kettles the next morning, find her ring, gave it to her and she gave us a $100 donation,” Chapman said.

Chapman said every year, they find odds and ends inside the red kettles.

“We have a little collection in our counting room of all the weird things we get in the kettle,” Chapman said.

Since the woman was reunited with her ring, she said she hasn't taken it off once.

Police: Washington State mother under investigation for infant's death

Published: Sunday, December 17, 2017 @ 5:51 AM

Kent Police Department.
Kent Police Department
Kent Police Department.(Kent Police Department)

A 24-year-old Washington State woman is under investigation for homicide and reckless care that caused the death of her infant son, Kent Police said late Saturday.

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Medics were called on Dec. 12 after the 2-month old baby was found unresponsive, police said. 

Police said the mother placed the child on his stomach on top of a sleeping bag and left him unattended for at least 20 minutes while she watched television in another room.

When the mother returned, she found the child unresponsive and not breathing.

A GoFundMe page has been set up for the child's memorial fund. Click here to view. 

CSX railroad chief Hunter Harrison dies

Published: Sunday, December 17, 2017 @ 4:55 AM

Hunter Harrison was the CEO of the Florida-based CSX railroad company.
Associated Press file photo
Hunter Harrison was the CEO of the Florida-based CSX railroad company.(Associated Press file photo)

Hunter Harrison, the president and CEO of railroad giant CSX, died Saturday in Florida. He was 73.

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CSX confirmed Harrison’s death in a statement, saying it was caused by “unexpectedly severe complications” from a recent illness. His death comes only a couple of days after the company announced he was taking an unplanned medical leave of absence.

“Hunter was a larger-than-life figure who brought his remarkable passion, experience and energy in railroading to CSX,” the company said in a statement.

Harrison was hired by Florida-based CSX in March under shareholder pressure. But recently there had been concerns about his health. The Wall Street Journal reported in May that Harrison often worked from his Wellington home and occasionally required portable oxygen.

Harrison, a member of the Wellington horse set, lived in a 9,200-square-foot mansion at Palm Beach Polo & Country Club, according to property records. He paid $4 million for the property in 2008.

The property now is held in the name of Harrison’s wife, Jeannie Harrison. They have a homestead exemption.

And the Harrison family’s Double H Farm owns a 22-acre property in Wellington.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee, Harrison was a long-time railroad executive who made his career turning around railroads.

“With the passing of Hunter Harrison, CSX has suffered a major loss. Notwithstanding that loss, the Board is confident that Jim Foote, as acting Chief Executive Officer, and the rest of the CSX team will capitalize on the changes that Hunter has made,” Edward J. Kelly III, Chairman of the CSX Board of Directors, said.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.