Cleveland Clinic demands retraction from Yes on Issue 2 campaign

Published: Thursday, October 05, 2017 @ 12:26 PM
Updated: Thursday, October 05, 2017 @ 12:26 PM

WHIO Reports State Issue 2 October 1 2017

The Cleveland Clinic has sent a cease and desist letter to the PAC supporting Ohio Issue 2 claiming the campaign illegally used its CEO’s image on mailers, making it look like he was supporting the ballot issue.

The flyer, which was mailed to a large number of Ohio households, used Dr. Toby Cosgrove’s photo and the name of the Cleveland Clinic, “to infer that they support Issue 2,” according to the letter.

The proposed Ohio Drug Price Relief Act will appear on the Nov. 7 ballot as Issue 2. It would prohibit the state from paying more for prescription drugs than what the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs pays.

FULL COVERAGE: Helping you understand Ohio Issue 2

“Dr. Cosgrove and Cleveland Clinic did not authorize this use. Neither the Cleveland Clinic nor Dr. Cosgrove have taken any position on Issue 2 and do not intend to do so,” the letter to Ohio Taxpayers for Lower Drug Prices says.

The clinic is demanding a retraction be sent to the same households as the original flyer. According to the Akron Beacon Journal, the mailer could have been sent to up to 2 million households.

This is not the first time a campaign spearheaded by AIDS Healthcare Foundation President Michael Weinstein has been called out for a misrepresentation.

During a campaign earlier this year in Los Angeles to put restrictions on real estate development, Mayor Eric Garcetti accused the Weinstein-backed “Yes on S” campaign of using his likeness without permission in order to make it appear that he supported the measure. He was on record as being adamantly opposed, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Weinstein’s AHF is funding the Yes on 2 campaign.

We’ve reached out to the campaign for comment on the Cleveland Clinic’s accusations.

MORE ISSUE 2 COVERAGE:

Yes vs. No on Issue 2: What they’re saying on both sides

Your questions answered about Issue 2

Ohio’s drug price ballot issue: What’s really going on?

Trending - Most Read Stories

Take our poll: Would you vote for a levy to pay for school security?

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:53 AM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:53 AM

After 17 people died in a high school shooting in Florida, one Ohio mayor wants school leaders to consider using the ballot box to improve school safety. (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
After 17 people died in a high school shooting in Florida, one Ohio mayor wants school leaders to consider using the ballot box to improve school safety. (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

After 17 people died in a high school shooting in Florida, one Ohio mayor wants school leaders to consider using the ballot box to improve school safety.

WOIO-TV reports Streetsboro Mayor Glenn Broska in a Facebook post reacting to last week’s Parkland, Florida, school shooting says the Streetsboro schools should either “find” money to pay for armed security guards or put a small levy on the ballot.

The district is outside of Cleveland.

Broska says at least $500,000 a year is needed to pay for two armed guards at each of the district’s four schools. Broska wrote: “We have to defend our children and it starts with us.”

RELATED: 4 students arrested as threats rock southwest Ohio schools

The Streetsboro school board says it will consider Broska’s idea and suggested he might consider a city levy to finance increased school security.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

» Can students get in trouble for #NeverAgain walkouts?

» TRENDING: Hundreds of local students walk out after Florida shooting, more walkouts planned 

Trending - Most Read Stories

Envelope with white powder sent to Sen. Portman’s office

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 5:22 PM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 5:22 PM


            Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio
Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio

Hazmat crews are testing white powder that was on an envelope received at U.S. Senator Rob Portman’s office in Columbus on Friday, according to 10TV .

RELATED: Vanessa Trump taken to hospital after white powder scare

Crews were called to 37 West Broad Street in downtown Columbus just before 4.p.m. Friday.

Battalion Chief Steve Martin said the incident remains under investigation at this time.

Channel 10 will continue to update this story as it develops

Trending - Most Read Stories

Gov. John Kasich wants group to act on gun issues by next week

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 2:15 PM

Gov. Kasich forms group to tackle gun violence in Ohio. Getty Images
Gov. Kasich forms group to tackle gun violence in Ohio. Getty Images

Ohio Gov. John Kasich said he is hoping that a group he’s convened to find solutions to gun violence in the state will be able to deliver something by the end of business next week to the Ohio General Assembly.

Kasich, in Washington, D.C. for a meeting of the National Governors Association, declined to lay out what the group is considering, but said they’ve reached agreements on four different issues. The governor’s office declined to disclose the members of the group, but Kasich said they are on both sides of the gun debate.

TAKE OUR POLL: Would you support a school levy to pay for security?

Kasich himself said he advocates complete background checks and “the need to have these large magazines” but acknowledged that the committee may go in a different direction. “One of the things I don’t want to do in this process is put my finger so much on the scale that the committee doesn’t have a chance to work,” he said.

He said he’s talked to House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger and Senate President Larry Obhof as well as some members to say “this is not going to go away.”

“It’s apparent,” he said. “People are saying something has to be done. And I think that peole are saying do something. When people demand something over and over and over again politicians usually respond.”

RELATED: 4 students arrested as threats rock southwest Ohio schools

Kasich talks debt, New Hampshire

Kasich also spent time in D.C. where he accepted the Concord Coalition’s “Economic Patriot” Award and led a panel discussion on the nation’s woes.

Kasich, who chaired the House Budget Committee the last time the federal government balanced the budget in 1997, didn’t sound particularly optimistic about the nation’s current spending path.

“The biggest problem with spending is it’s all theoretical and hypothetical,” he said. “Nobody cares.”

He said Republicans and Democrats alike have contributed to the ballooning debt, which he predicts will ultimately have a “dramatic impact” on our economic growth.

“They’re all in the game – all of them,” he said. “Spend money like there’s no tomorrow.”

He also visited the nation’s capital on the same day that Politico reported he was preparing to run for president in 2020. Kasich dismissed the report, saying he told his wife “pay no attention.”

Still, he was more coy at the Concord Coalition event, saying he’d urged Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper to run as a Democrat and urging those running in the state to “be real…because the people in New Hampshire are really cool. They smell a fraud.”

“And by the way,” he said, to laughter. “I like New Hampshire a lot.”

» TRENDING: Hundreds of local students walk out after Florida shooting, more walkouts planned

Trending - Most Read Stories

Ohio may crack down on prostitution to fight opioid crisis

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 12:33 PM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 12:33 PM


            Ohio may increase the penalties on people who solicit prostitutes in an effort to fight the state’s opioid crisis.
Ohio may increase the penalties on people who solicit prostitutes in an effort to fight the state’s opioid crisis.

Ohio may increase the penalties on people who solicit prostitutes in an effort to fight the state’s opioid crisis.

A bill proposed would increase the penalty from a third-degree to a first-degree misdemeanor. Those convicted could face up to 180 days in jail. Currently the penalty is up to 60 days.

RELATED: Damage from opioid crisis tops $1 trillion

The bill was introduced by Rep. Adam Miller, D-Columbus, and Rep. Jim Hughes, R-Upper Arlington.

The Columbus Dispatch reports Democrat Sen. Enda Brown and Republican Sen. Stephanie Kunze plan to sponsor a sister bill that would increase the potential fine for so-called “johns” from $500 to $2,500.

MORE: Collaborative effort needed for solutions to Ohio opioid crisis

Brown says drug abuse leaves people vulnerable and susceptible to fueling their addiction any way they can. She says that’s resulted in a rise in prostitution among women suffering from addiction.

Forum: Solutions to opioid crisis in Ohio should be ‘self-sustaining, repeatable’

Collaborative effort needed for solutions to Ohio opioid crisis

Residents weigh-in on drug crisis: ‘People are in despair and hopeless’

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Trending - Most Read Stories