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Springfield teens search for dad's killer

Published: Tuesday, February 16, 2016 @ 4:11 PM
Updated: Tuesday, February 16, 2016 @ 4:11 PM

SPRINGFIELD - Two teenagers are determined to find out who killed their father 13 years ago. They recently reached out to News Center 7 in a letter asking us to
look into this Clark County cold case. 

The body of Chad Mullenix, 23, was found by a neighbor in his apartment at the Ashton Meadows complex on January 23, 2003. He was laying on his back in the kitchen
with a gunshot wound to the head. 

Chad's children were only babies when he was shot to death but now Kiersten Mullenix, 17 and her brother Phillip, 16, are on the hunt for his killer.

"I just want to know why and who? I could be seeing the guy everyday, or her," said Kiersten. "I just want to know why and why...why my dad?"

Kiersten, who is graduating from high school in May, is planning to go to college and major in criminal justice. 

"I want to be a detective. I want to help people get justice that I haven't gotten," said Kiersten. 

Phillip is interested in cars and his mother, Heather Moore, said he looks a lot like his father. 

"They've always known about their dad," said Moore. "I've always kept the memory alive." 

Clark County Sheriff Gene Kelly said the Mullenix murder is on his list of cold cases. Detectives just need that additional piece of evidence to bring this case to a conclusion. 

"We believe that we've had a viable suspect and we believe that the person who took his life, who committed this homicide, still lives in this area," said Sheriff Kelly.

Detectives said Mullenix, who suffered from Cerebral Palsy, was taking prescribed painkillers. They also know that he had been a victim of arson when a girlfriend set his van on fire.
They also know that he was alive on Jan. 21 when he was captured by a bank camera getting money out of his account.

However, robbery does not appear to be the motive because nothing was missing from Chad's apartment and he has $500 in his pocket at the time of the murder.

"Chad left behind two children and in his memory, we would like to solve this crime," said Kelly.

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Hundreds join annual heart walk at Upper Valley Mall

Published: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 4:12 PM

More than 300 people, mostly in red, participated in the annual Clark and Champaign Counties Heart Walk today at the Upper Valley Mall.

The local walk joins efforts by the American Heart Association to fight heart disease and stroke. The annual event also featured vendor booths and a health fair, and was sponsored by Springfield Regional Medical Center.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

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Delta ending discount for NRA members 

Published: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 10:40 AM
Updated: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 11:24 AM

Delta Air Lines will be ending discounts for NRA members.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Delta Air Lines will be ending discounts for NRA members.(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines announced Saturday it is ending a discount for National Rifle Association members.

>> Read more trending news

The move comes as some other businesses broke ties with the NRA amid debate over gun control in the wake of the Parkland school shooting in Florida earlier this month.

“We will be requesting that the NRA remove our information from its website,” Delta said in a written statement.

>> 3 car rental companies cancel discounts for NRA members 

The move comes as some other businesses break ties with the NRA amid debate over gun control in the wake of the Parkland school shooting in Florida earlier this month

Following is a list of some of the companies that have cut ties or distanced themselves from the NRA:

  • United Airlines -- United tweeted Saturday, "United is notifying the NRA that we will no longer offer a discounted rate to their annual meeting and we are asking that the NRA remove our information from their website." 

  • Delta Air Lines -- Delta issued the following statement Saturday: "Delta is reaching out to the National Rifle Association to let it know we will be ending its contract for discounted rates through our group travel program. We will be requesting that the NRA remove our information from its website." 

  • First National Bank of Omaha -- The bank announced that it would not renew a co-branded Visa credit-card with the NRA.

  • The Hertz Corp. -- The rental car company ended its discount program for NRA members.

  • MetLife Inc. -- The insurer terminated discounts that had been offered to NRA members on the NRA website

  • Enterprise Holdings Inc. -- The car rental company that also owns Alamo and National cut off discounts for NRA members.

  • Symantec Corp. -- The software company that makes Norton Antivirus technology ended its discount program with the NRA.

  • Chubb Ltd. -- The insurer announced it was ending participation in the NRA's gun-owner insurance program, though it provided notice three months ago.

  • Best Western -- The hotel chain told multiple social media users that it was no longer affiliated with the NRA, though it did not say when that decision was made.

  • Wyndham Hotels -- The hotel chain told social media users it is no longer affiliated with the NRA without specifying when that decision was made.

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Daytonian shares Ali’s favorite title belt and legacy

Published: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 3:39 PM

Tony Shultz (right) holding Ali's belt with WBC President Mauricio Sulaiman with world champions Zab Judah and Jessie Vargas.
Tony Shultz (right) holding Ali's belt with WBC President Mauricio Sulaiman with world champions Zab Judah and Jessie Vargas.

The decorated green strip of leather was the first WBC title belt custom-made for a boxer, and that boxer was Muhammad Ali, according to Tony Shultz, a Daytonian who shares the belt with everyone he meets. 

The 39-year-old who lives in the Dayton View Triangle neighborhood is a former boxer who trained with the likes of Manny Pacquiao and Roy Jones Jr. 

Shultz said the belt was given to him at Ali's funeral by Ali's wife, Lonnie.

MORE >>> One of our writers prepares to step into the ring 

"This was the first belt created for a champion," Shultz said. "It was created to divide all the weight divisions. This was the heavyweight championship belt and named the "Ali WBC Belt" because it would always have his image on it as the division's greatest champion." 

The belt has the signatures of many famous boxers — including Sugar Ray Leonard, Tommy "The Hitman" Hearns and Neon Leon Spinks, who defeated Ali in 1978 in one of the biggest upsets in boxing history. 

Shultz said the belt was Ali’s favorite and he often wore it around the house. 

"After he passed away, Lonnie (Ali's wife) decided that she wanted to keep the Ali legacy alive and the best way she could do that was having a belt in circulation," Shultz said. "All the other belts are either in the Ali Center, they're in the museum or his kids have them. This is actually the only Ali belt that's in circulation, outside of the 'Rumble in the Jungle' belt which just sold at a private auction." 

Shultz said he was given the belt on the condition that he share it with people and thus share Ali's legacy. 

>> 3 unforgettable moments in Dayton’s boxing history

"Lonnie gave it to me, said 'Tony, here's the deal. I want you to have every champion that you know, every champion that you meet, sign it … have their story told. I want (to continue) Ali's legacy of humanity, his spirit of equality, fairness, and most importantly that of conquering any challenges," he said. 

At the last sparring session for Dayton Fight Night competitors at the Brown Institute of Martial Arts, Shultz brought the keepsake and let anybody who wanted to have a photo taken with it draped over their shoulder. 

Shultz will be sharing the amazing keepsake tonight at Memorial Hall at Dayton Fight Night. Tickets are $20. The doors open at 7 p.m.

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FDA approves blood test that can detect concussions 

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:58 PM

Maxime Chanot #4 of New York City FC holds his head after a clash of heads form a corner kick during the New York City FC Vs San Jose Earthquakes regular season MLS game at Yankee Stadium on April 1, 2017 in New York City. 
Tim Clayton - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images
Maxime Chanot #4 of New York City FC holds his head after a clash of heads form a corner kick during the New York City FC Vs San Jose Earthquakes regular season MLS game at Yankee Stadium on April 1, 2017 in New York City. (Tim Clayton - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images)

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved a breakthrough blood test that can help detect concussions in adults.

>> Read more trending news 

The blood test, also known as the Banyan Brain Trauma Indicator Test, works by measuring UCH-L1 and GFAP, both proteins released from the brain into the blood, within 12 hours of a head injury.

It can be administered as soon as 15 minutes after the injury, but results take a few hours to produce.

>> Related: When love isn’t enough: A daughter’s suicide leaves a grieving father searching for answers

According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traumatic brain injury is a “serious public health problem in the United States.” In 2013 alone, there were about 2.8 million visits to emergency rooms for traumatic brain injury-related conditions. Of these, nearly 50,000 people died.

TBI is typically caused by a blow or bump to the head, or a by a head injury that disrupts the brain’s normal functioning. It can range from mild to severe. About 75 percent of TBIs that occur each year are assessed as mild TBIs or concussions. 

>> Related: Spit test could diagnose concussion in kids, study says

Most patients with traumatic brain injury undergo a neurological exam, followed by a CT scan.

For their research, the FDA evaluated data on 1,947 individual blood samples from adults with suspected mild TBI or concussion and reviewed the product’s performance by comparing blood test results with CT scan results.

They found the blood test was 97.5 percent as effective in detecting concussion and 99.6 perfect as effective in ruling out the injury.

The test also costs as little as one-tenth as much as a CT scan.

» RELATED: Which high school sports have the most concussions? 

"A blood test that accurately, reliably and consistently detects the presence of brain proteins that appear in the blood after a brain injury is a major advance," Dr. David Dodick, a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology who specializes in sports medicine and neurology, told CNN. Dodick was not involved in the study.

One of the challenges of diagnosing concussions is that the injury’s symptoms can occur at various times. For some, they appear instantly. Others may not experience symptoms for hours or even days.

» RELATED: Football players under 12 at high risk of brain injury, study finds

Symptoms also vary from person to person. Some may experience light or noise sensitivity, or may lose balance.

“This is something that has been a long time coming,” Col. Dallas Hack, who was director of the Army’s Combat Casualty Care Research Program from 2008 to 2014 and is now retired, told the New York Times. 

“The concept originally was that we would have something that medical personnel in the field would be able to use to assess whether somebody who had received a head injury needed a higher level of care,” Hack said.

» RELATED: Youth football called ‘child abuse’

But Dodick told CNN that researchers still need to better understand when brains have fully healed from trauma and how the protein biomarkers may actually affect prognosis. Additionally, it’s unclear whether or not the new test can determine subconcussive blows, hits to the head that don’t always cause symptoms but do cause brain injury. 

Subconcussive or repeat blows are believed to lead to the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. Over time, that damage may lead to personality changes, mood disorders and other behavioral issues.

"These occur much more often than actual concussions, especially in certain collision and contact sports,” Dodick told CNN.

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