SNEAK PEEK: Dayton’s newest brewery now hiring, gearing up to open

Published: Friday, June 30, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Sneak peek inside Lock 27 Brewing in downtown Dayton

The Dayton area’s ever-expanding beer scene will welcome a new and major player in the next two months.

>> PHOTOS: Check out the inside of Lock 27 Brewing

Lock 27 Brewing’s new downtown Dayton brewery and restaurant in the Delco Lofts building adjacent to Fifth Third Field is poised to ramp up hiring “in the next week or two” in anticipation of an August opening, according to brewery founder Steve Barnhart.

8 things you’ll love about new Canal Street Arcade and Deli

Lock 27 will be the third restaurant/beer pub to open in the space of about two months within a stone’s throw of the Dayton Dragon’s baseball stadium, joining Canal Street Arcade and Deli, which opened this week, and Mudlick Taphouse, which is poised to open in the coming days.

New Mudlick Tap House ‘so close we can almost taste it’ (April 2017)

“This neighborhood was a blank slate, and we’re excited to see what it’s developing into,” Barnhart said.

The Lock 27 brewpub is expected to seat about 120 to 150 and will serve lunch and dinner seven days a week, Barnhart said. Customer seating will be along the first-floor wall overlooking the Fifth Third Field plaza.

Dayton’s craft beer: A guide to breweries 

The brewery and restaurant will occupy about 12,000 square feet of the Delco Building’s basement and first floor. It will open with about 50 employees, Barnhart said. The original Lock 27 location on Ohio 48 in south Centerville has open interviews every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., and starting July 11, the downtown Dayton location will hold open interviews on Tuesdays and Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

The brewery’s restaurant will have an open kitchen on the first floor. Its brewhouse will be in the basement, with some of the tanks and other taller pieces of brewing equipment extending through the basement ceiling to create a visual centerpiece of sorts for the first-floor restaurant, Barnhart said.

Lock 27 to build 2nd brewery, pub in downtown Dayton

At Barnhart’s urging, those working on the brewery build-out have found creative ways to re-use and incorporate some of the items left behind in the building prior to construction of the brewery and the 100-plus Delco Loft apartments.

Initial plans call for distributing Lock 27’s downtown Dayton beers in kegs only, but there is space to add a canning or bottling line for potential future retail distribution, Barnhart said.

Centerville brewery doubles its capacity to meet demand

Barnhart is a native of Chicago who moved to the Dayton area in 1984. He spent 15 years working in corporate development at NCR. An avid home-brewer since 1997, Barnhart opened Lock 27 in Centerville in June 2013.

Power outage ends for most near Miami Valley Hospital, UD student neighborhoods

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:17 PM
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:41 PM

Brown Street loses power

UPDATE @ 7:39 p.m.:  The DP&L online outage map now shows 126 customers without power along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the UD student neighborhoods, from Chambers Street to U.S. 35. 

A hospital administrator at MVH said the hospital is operating on generator power. 

Elevators there stopped immediately when the outage struck about 6:45 p.m., she said. Workers and security were able to get everyone off the cars, she said. 

No patients were put in danger because of the outage, she said.

INITIAL REPORT

Hundreds of businesses and residences along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the University of Dayton student neighborhoods, are without power. 

According to the Dayton Power & Light online outage map, nearly 1,200 customers are affected. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Guest lists being checked to track drug dealers

Calls began coming into the newsroom just before 7 p.m. 

We’re hearing the outage extends along Brown Street, from Chambers Street west to U.S. 35. 

Jimmy’s Ladder 11, in the 900 block of Brown, and Subway, in the 1100 block, are among the businesses in the dark. 

We have a call into DP&L for details about the possible cause of the outage.

Stay with whio.com for breaking news.

Tom Petty died of accidental drug overdose, family says

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:15 PM

The Life of Tom Petty

Tom Petty died from an accidental drug overdose after taking a variety of medications, the family for the legendary rock star said Friday. 

>> Read more trending news

Petty, who suffered emphysema, knee problems and more recently a fractured hip, was prescribed various pain medications including Fentanyl patches, his family said. 

“On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” his family wrote on Facebook

The family called Petty’s Oct. 2 death an unfortunate accident. 

“As a family we recognize this report may spark a further discussion on the opioid crisis and we feel that it is a healthy and necessary discussion and we hope in some way this report can save lives. Many people who overdose begin with a legitimate injury or simply do not understand the potency and deadly nature of these medications.”

DOVER, DE - JUNE 22: Tom Petty performs onstage at the Firefly Music Festival at The Woodlands of Dover International Speedway on June 22, 2013 in Dover, Delaware. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Firefly Music Festival)(Theo Wargo)

Everything you need to know in the event of a government shutdown

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 6:41 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

The fight over a border wall, the fate of nearly 800,000 DACA recipients, and the wrangling over the funding of an insurance program for children could force a U.S. government shutdown after midnight on Friday if Congress does not pass legislation that would keep the government up and running.

A government shutdown doesn’t mean the government completely shuts down. Employees and services deemed “essential” would remain in place. Here’s a breakdown.

Will a shutdown delay my tax refund?

Wright Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown occurs

What happens to veterans?

Will I get my mail?

Could travel plans be impacted?

Wright Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown occurs

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 5:46 PM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employs more than 27,000 employees and is the largest single-site employer in Ohio. The base has a $4.1 billion economic impact in Ohio. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employs more than 27,000 employees and is the largest single-site employer in Ohio. The base has a $4.1 billion economic impact in Ohio. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Thousands of Wright-Patterson employees were expected to report to work Monday morning for further instructions “to carry out orderly shutdown activities” if a partial federal government closure stuck at midnight Friday, base authorities said.

The scenario could be a replay of October 2013 when most civil service employees at Wright-Patterson were sent home on furlough at the state’s largest single-site employer with more than 27,000 personnel, but how many might be impacted in another temporary closure could not be answered Friday.

“It is difficult to determine how many employees would be impacted because a determination of the furlough parameters has not been released,” base spokeswoman Marie Vanover said in an email.

All military personnel, regardless of their job, would report for duty, according to the Defense Department.

RELATED: Threat of government shutdown wearing on workers

Those who stay on the job — both military and civilian — will not be paid until a Congressional appropriations bill is passed, according to the Pentagon. The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force planned to remain open over the weekend unless it receives a shutdown order, according to spokeswoman Diana Bachert. She said the museum would issue an update to the news media, and post an alert on the museum’s social media sites and its website if it must close.

Retired Col. Cassie B. Barlow, installation commander of Wright-Patterson the last time a shutdown hit, said Friday carrying out shutdown activities were “very complex” and “all encompassing.”

“I feel sorry for the folks on the base right now and what they have to go through,” she said. “It’s very frustrating. It’s frustrating for the commanders, but it’s also frustrating for all of the employees because they are starved for information right now and they’re listening to the news …

“It’s a stressful time especially when there’s a potential to not get paid,” she said, adding it was “no way” to treat employees or run a business.

The Pentagon issued a contingency plan Friday that listed broad categories where employees may be allowed to stay on the job, such as police, fire and medical services and other duties deemed “essential” to national security.

RELATED: What if a government shutdown happened: Five things to know

The reverberations of a government shutdown would be similar to the last one struck in 2013, according to Air Force Capt. Hope Cronin.

“We are hopeful that there is enough time for Congress to prevent a lapse in appropriations,” she said Friday afternoon. “However, at this time, we must plan for a range of scenarios” that include a short-term stopgap funding measure, a budget deal or a shutdown.

Air Force reservists were expected to attend a previously funded drill weekend Saturday and Sunday at the base with the 445th Airlift Wing, said spokeswoman Lt. Col. Cynthia Harris.

Among other impacts, U.S. District Court in Dayton would remain open, federal Judge Walter Rice said Friday. “I don’t expect any immediate change,” he said.

RELATED: Will a shutdown happen? Wright-Patterson in holding pattern

The U.S. Postal Service mail delivery and post offices would stay open and Social Security payments would continue to recipients, according to authorities.

The Ohio National Guard issued a statement Friday saying the agency would continue national defense operations and respond to state emergencies.

At the University of Dayton Research Institute, which has millions of dollars in federal contracts employing some 200 people, some employees may be prevented from doing their jobs and the institute “would need to find other work for them as possible,” John Leland, UDRI executive director, said in a statement. “Other contract work might have to shift temporarily shift from a government installation to a UD facility.”

Those changes are “disruptive” and “causes waste at taxpayer expense,” he added.

Head Start education programs for pre-schoolers were expected to be open Monday if a shutdown occurred, but a long-term government closure may have an impact on operations, according to Barbara Haxton, executive director of the Ohio Head State Association in Dayton.