Severe Weather: Slight vs Enhanced Risk

Published: Thursday, February 23, 2017 @ 1:41 PM

In advance of the potential for strong to severe storms, the Storm Prediction Center will issue a report that is known as their convective outlook. This is used to help highlight the regions that will have the greatest ingredients for storm development. 

 

One of the more commonly used outlooks is the ‘Slight Risk’. 

This means a few storms could reach severe criteria; wind damage is possible as well as hail up to one inch in diameter with an isolated spin-up tornado.

 

If the Storm Prediction Center believes there is a greater risk for severe storms, they will elevate a region to an Enhanced Risk. 

This indicated that within the region highlighted, there could be more numerous severe storms and the systems potential longevity is greater. There is also a higher risk for several damage reports, hail one to two inches in diameter and a few tornados possible.

Stay weather aware anytime, anywhere by downloading our free WHIO Weather App.  You’ll have immediate access to live radar and can receive alerts anytime severe weather is approaching.

Congress already squeezed by its 2017 calendar

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 9:02 PM
Updated: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 9:02 PM

While the calendar says we are days away from the month of June, Republicans in Congress are already feeling pressure over their legislative agenda for 2017, as time is already growing short for GOP efforts to overhaul the Obama health law, which also puts a time squeeze on other major initiatives on Capitol Hill.

There are no votes scheduled this week in the Congress; the Senate returns to legislative session on June 5, while the House is back in Washington, D.C. on June 6.

Here’s some of what faces Republicans in the Congress:

1. Everything keys off of the GOP health care bill. Because the GOP is trying to use the expedited “budget reconciliation” process, which allows them to avoid a filibuster in the Senate, nothing involved with next year’s budget – or with tax reform – can move until health care is settled. GOP Senators have been meeting regularly in recent weeks to decide what to do on health care – but they don’t have a deal as yet, and no one is quiet sure when they might have a vote. “We’re a long ways from that,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND) told reporters this week. “Damned if I know,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) said about when a deal might be reached. Writing their own bill takes time.

2. Why do you keep saying there isn’t much time? Two things are at work here – the Congressional calendar, and the limits on the “budget reconciliation” process. The authorization to use reconciliation for a health care bill expires on September 30 – the end of the 2017 Fiscal Year. So, the GOP has four months to figure out a bill, and get it approved and sent to the President. But, lawmakers won’t be here much of that four month period. In fact, between now and the end of the fiscal year – there are 43 scheduled legislative work days in the House, which mirrors the Senate schedule. That’s 43 legislative days in session spread out over 18 weeks. You could always get extra time by scrapping the August recess, or working some weekends.

3. The budget is way behind schedule – more than usual. This past week, President Trump delivered his 2018 budget to the Congress. Normally that is done in February. The House and Senate only started having hearings on spending bills this past week. Lawmakers were supposed to approve the blueprint known as the “budget resolution” by April 15. As of now, that plan doesn’t even exist. Congress is supposed to pass all spending bills by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, but that has not happened since 1996. With the schedule still showing five weeks off during the summer, there is no way that lawmakers are going to meet that spending deadline, which will pave the way for stop gap budgets, and then most likely a year-end omnibus spending deal. Sound familiar?

4. Tax reform still hasn’t taken shape. Despite the Sunday tweet by President Trump about his tax plans, it was obvious in budget hearings last week involving Secretary of Treasury Stephen Mnuchin that a Trump tax plan is not ready to be rolled out any time soon. Remember – all we have right now is a one page document with some bullet points. Even if the White House put out the details this next week, Republicans couldn’t take it up under budget reconciliation rules until they get finished with health care legislation. And, as stated above, the GOP does not seem to be near a deal. Senate Republicans probably cannot let June go by without some kind of agreement on health care.

5. You can’t pass bills when you aren’t in DC. Whenever I point out how the Congress is going to be home for an extended break, I always hear from people who say, “If they’re not in DC, they can’t screw things up.” Yes, that’s true. On the other hand, it’s also true that when they aren’t working on Capitol Hill, they can’t pass any bills to fix things, either. And for Republicans right now, if you aren’t at work on the floors of the House and Senate, you aren’t passing any of President Trump’s agenda. Those Republican lawmakers having town hall meetings this week will get a lot of attention.

It’s not even the end of May. But time is already running short for Republicans in 2017.

Related

Memorial Day 2017: Soldiers place 280,000 flags on headstones of fallen service members 

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 9:00 PM

As part of a Memorial Day tradition, soldiers placed 280,000 flags on the headstones of fallen service members at Arlington National Cemetery.

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The tradition, which soldiers call “Flags In,” has been held every year since the 3rd U.S. Infantry, known as the “Old Guard,” was designated as the Army’s official ceremonial unit 70 years ago.

RELATED: On Memorial Day, President Trump honors those who have made the ultimate sacrifice

Specialist Kristen Pinnock participated in the tribute for the first time this year, telling WFLA, “I’m thinking about the families -- what they had gone through, what they still go through.”

“It really pulls at your heartstrings as it reminds you that we’ll always be there. We’ll always honor our guys,” Staff Sgt. Jason Kohne said.

RELATED: Take a look at this moving memorial dedicated to soldiers who lost their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan

It takes nearly 1,000 soldiers to complete the ritual, and they also perform the same task at U.S. Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

“I would do this every single year I could until I retire, if I could,” Army Pvt. Wes DeFee said told The Washington Examiner. “It’s such an honor to help the families and support them with honor and respect.”

Tiger Woods issues statement on DUI arrest, says no alcohol involved

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 8:20 PM

Tiger Woods is apologizing to family, friends and fans following his DUI arrest early Monday in Juniper, Florida.

“I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions,” the pro golfer said in a statement Monday night, according to The Associated Press.

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Woods clarified that “an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications,” not alcohol, was a factor in the arrest.

“I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn’t realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly.

“I would like to apologize with all my heart to my family, friends and the fans. I expect more from myself too.”

Related: Tiger Woods arrested on drunken driving charges in Florida

The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office said Woods, 41, was arrested around 3 a.m. ESPN reported he was booked at 7:18 a.m. People reported that he was released on his own recognizance at 10:50 a.m.

Woods said in a blog post on his website last week that, following a recent surgery on his back, he is focusing on short-term goals rather than a fast return to golf.

“Presently, I’m not looking ahead,” he wrote. “I can’t twist for another two and a half to three months. Right now, my sole focus is rehab and doing what the doctors tell me. I am concentrating on short-term goals.”

“It was instant nerve relief,” Woods said of the surgery. “I haven’t felt this good in years.”

The surgery was the fourth done on his back since spring 2014.

Woods said that “the long-term prognosis is positive” for a return to golf.

Read Woods’ full statement, from USA Today, below:

I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions. I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn't realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly.

I would like to apologize with all my heart to my family, friends and the fans. I expect more from myself too. I will do everything in my power to ensure this never happens again.

I fully cooperated with law enforcement, and I would like to personally thank the representatives of the Jupiter Police Department and the Palm Beach County Sheriff's office for their professionalism."

Navy SEAL falls to death in Hudson River after parachute failure

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 5:51 PM

In this Sunday, May 28, 2017 photo, the U.S. Coast Guard rescues a U.S. Navy SEAL who fell into the Hudson River after his parachute failed to open during a Fleet Week demonstration over the river in Jersey City, N.J. The Navy said the parachutist was pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center. 
Joe Shine/AP

 

An investigation is underway into the tragic death of a Navy SEAL in a parachuting accident Sunday during a demonstration for Fleet Week in Jersey City, New Jersey, across the Hudson River from Manhattan.

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The SEAL, part of the Navy’s elite skydiving team, the Leap Frogs, plunged to his death in the river when his chute failed to open, according to a Navy spokesperson.

The SEAL was immediately rescued from the water, but later pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center, the Navy said in a statement.

The parachutist was not identified pending notification of his family.

“Our hearts and prayers go out to his family, and I ask for all your prayers for the Navy SEAL community who lost a true patriot today,” Navy Rear Adm. Jack Scorby said, according to The Associated Press

The Leap Frogs have numerous performances scheduled throughout the rest of the year, according to their website.