Second Ward turnout sparse in meetings to plan Hamilton’s future

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 9:32 AM


            A corridor in Lindenwald. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF
A corridor in Lindenwald. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

When residents participating in the Plan Hamilton effort to create a 10- to 15-year vision for the city’s future met in five areas of the city recently, they were asked to place dots on a city map to represent where they live.

As a neighborhood leader of the Lindenwald neighborhood looked at that map on Wednesday, he noted dots were notably sparse in some of the poorest areas of the city, including the East Side neighborhoods of the 2nd and 4th wards, Jefferson, the East End, and even northern Lindenwald.

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Those are some of the city’s areas most in need of help, noted Frank Downie, chairman of PROTOCOL (People Reaching Out To Others; Celebrate Our Lindenwald).

It’s especially surprising because city leaders had taken care to distribute the five meetings throughout Hamilton, including at Booker T. Washington Community in the 2nd Ward on July 22, a Saturday.

Wendy Moeller, owner and principal planner of Blue Ash-based Compass Point Planning, which is facilitating the comprehensive plan, said the East Side turnout was disappointing. The map’s dots make it easy to see the gaps.

“The main reason we did this map is we wanted to see if there were those big spots, and then we need to re-think how we need to get those folks engaged,” she said. “We will probably try to do some strategies to get them involved, but there’s other things we’re going to be doing …”

“We are trying to get any idea to go out there,” she added. “Sometimes it’s very engaging to go out to churches, or if they have local community events there.”

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While the Lindenwald business district made both lists of things residents are proud of and want to see improved in coming years, not making either list was the 2nd Ward, which city officials have previously committed to work to revitalize along with Lindenwald in coming years.

“There were a number of places that called out the 2nd and 4th wards,” Moeller said. “People talked about neighborhoods, or even sub-neighborhoods that we didn’t try to identify individually. A lot of times they were identified in specific meetings, and didn’t necessarily cross all of them.”

“That’s why one of the things I continuously hounded on was ‘Just because you don’t see something specifically here does not mean it’s not important,’” she said. “This (series of lists of top issues raised) is where we’re just hearing repeated issues.”

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Bob Harris, president of the South East Civic Association, which focuses its efforts on the 2nd and 4th wards, said he attended the BTW Center meeting.

“I don’t know where Hamilton’s going to be 10 years from now,” Harris said. “What I do know is you have to have your best minds at the table. You need those who will work hard, with sweat equity, to make a difference in your city. And you do need diversity on all of your committees and boards.”

“That may not be something I’ll see in my lifetime,” he said. “That’s what we should be looking for as a community and a city.”

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Harris said the lack of diversity in city government, and on City Council, was one reason he supported a recent failed effort to place on the November ballot an issue that would change council’s elections to a ward system. Opponents have said a ward system could create infighting between parts of the city, and lead council members to represent parts of Hamilton, rather than the whole.

“I hope that what is being done this time (with Plan Hamilton), that we use that information to make a major difference,” Harris said.

One person transported to hospital after stabbing in Trotwood

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 12:30 AM
Updated: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 12:40 AM

ON SCENE:Stabbing reported at Trotwood apartment

At least one person was taken to Miami Valley Hospital early Wednesday following the report of a stabbing at the Wingate at Belle Meadows Apartments in Trotwood.

Police and medics were called late Tuesday night to a report of a woman stabbed.

Crews were dispatched around 11:50 p.m. to an apartment in the 300 block of Outer Belle Drive.

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According to initial reports, a caller heard glass breaking and a woman screaming.

Additional details were not available on scene. We will continue to follow this story.

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Hurricane Maria: Live updates

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 12:00 AM
Updated: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 1:12 AM

VIDEO: Hurricanes Jose and Maria From Space

Hurricane Maria is bearing down on the Caribbean and is set to pass over much the same area devastated by Hurricane Irma nearly two weeks ago.

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Middletown police: Beware tree-trimming scam

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 1:03 AM

Middletown police are warning residents of “unscrupulous tree trimmers” who have been taking advantage of elderly people.

The police department posted its warning Tuesday on its Facebook page.

One incident was thwarted, but the culprits were paid in another incident.

Police remind residents that door-to-door solicitors need a permit in the city. Call police if tree trimmers knock on your door uninvited.

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Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine offers tips to avoid tree-trimming scams. Beware of a tree trimmer who:

  • Comes to your door unexpectedly
  • Says your trees are diseased
  • Requires a large down payment
  • Accepts only cash or check
  • Says nothing about your right to cancel
  • Starts work immediately

Sidney businessman accused of not paying people in Piqua

Published: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 11:32 PM

Duaine E. Liette
MIAMI COUNTY JAIL
Duaine E. Liette(MIAMI COUNTY JAIL)

A 57-year-old Sidney businessman is facing numerous felony theft charges after multiple people claimed he hired them to do work but didn’t pay them.

Duaine E. Liette has a preliminary hearing scheduled for Wednesday afternoon in Miami County Municipal Court. He was arraigned Friday on four felony theft charges and three misdemeanor theft counts and was released from custody on his own recognizance.

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The cases were related to complaints from June 2015, June 2017 and July 2017, in which people stated they were hired to complete work for Liette but never received payment, according to Piqua police and court records.

Piqua police arrested Liette on Thursday at 1037 Broadway St., in Piqua. The house is owned by Sidney-based real estate company American Land Investments, of which Liette is listed as its principal; the business also has the same address as Liette’s residence, records show.

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Piqua police are urging anyone else who believe they may be victims to call 937-440-9111.