RTA to provide better transportation opportunities at Wright-Patt

Published: Friday, February 09, 2018 @ 9:33 AM


            Base personnel board an RTA bus on route X1A near the lodging office in Area A Jan. 31. As of Feb. 18, the RTA will begin providing transportation to and from the base through its RTA Connect On-Demand service, which means riders will still use the regular RTA buses to get to one of the RTA Connect transfer point locations, either at Wright State University on the Route 1 or at Old Harshman Road at Springfield Street on the Route 11. From there, a taxi provider or one of RTA’s other providers (an RTA driver with a smaller vehicle) will pick riders up at that location and then take them on base to the building they want to go to. (U.S. Air Force photo/2nd Lt. Weston Woodward)
Base personnel board an RTA bus on route X1A near the lodging office in Area A Jan. 31. As of Feb. 18, the RTA will begin providing transportation to and from the base through its RTA Connect On-Demand service, which means riders will still use the regular RTA buses to get to one of the RTA Connect transfer point locations, either at Wright State University on the Route 1 or at Old Harshman Road at Springfield Street on the Route 11. From there, a taxi provider or one of RTA’s other providers (an RTA driver with a smaller vehicle) will pick riders up at that location and then take them on base to the building they want to go to. (U.S. Air Force photo/2nd Lt. Weston Woodward)

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base personnel interested in a way to avoid driving to and from work in heavy traffic or bad weather or those who are frustrated with the difficulty of finding a parking space on base may soon be able to take advantage of an improved transportation program provided by the Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority, or RTA.

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The RTA Connect On-Demand program will begin service to and from the base Feb. 18, said Jessica Olson, communications manager with the Greater Dayton RTA.

The RTA Connect On-Demand program offers riders transportation service directly to the building they work at and is not limited to just one drop-off and pick -up time per day. So riders will no longer have to be concerned about missing the bus when traveling to and from work.

Currently, riders can connect with the RTA routes X1A and X1B at the Wright Stop Plaza Transit Center in downtown Dayton. Those routes run along designated bus stops along the route lines, which end on the base in Areas A and B. These stops are limited to the route line and only run service once in the morning and once in the afternoon after work. If a rider misses the bus, he or she has to find another way home.

When RTA Connect On-Demand service begins on base Feb. 18, riders will still use the regular RTA buses to get to one of the RTA Connect transfer point locations, either at Wright State University on the Route 1 or at Old Harshman Road at Springfield Street on the Route 11. From there, a taxi provider or one of RTA’s other providers (an RTA driver with a smaller vehicle) will pick riders up at that location and then take them on base to the building they want to go to. Riders must call the RTA at 937-425-8300 and select the RTA Connect On-Demand option to book directly with one of the approved providers.

Riders must work with security forces to ensure clearance onto the base for the driver. Some taxi providers have already been cleared for access onto the base, said Olson.

“Riders have the responsibility to work with security forces for clearance, but they can schedule it out with RTA. So if they work five days a week from this time to this time, they can schedule a month’s worth of trips around when they want to be picked up and dropped off,” said Olson.

Riders will be able to book transportation any time they want with no additional cost to the rider. When a bus pass is purchased, the pass is used to get to the connection point at Wright State University or on RTA Route 11 at Springfield Street and Old Harshman, she said.

Riders will be able to schedule their transportation onto and away from the base as they desire.

“It will just be in a smaller vehicle, a smaller RTA bus or with one of RTA’s service providers,” Olson said.

“Because we’re not running a big bus, riders can actually book this trip to go to any location the rider wants within the base directly at the desired drop-off location. The big busses were a lot more limited where they could get to on base. This additional trip doesn’t cost the rider anything extra,” Olson said.

“Existing on-base signage will be taken down at the former bus stops since there won’t be need for them any longer,” said Olson.

“RTA Connect On-Demand will be sort of a concierge service – a much nicer service to just book a trip, walk out the front door from any building on base, and transportation will be waiting for the rider to take them to the transfer point they need to get to,” she said.

For more information about the RTA Connect On-Demand opportunity, call Customer Service at 937-425-8300 or email them at customerservice@greaterdaytonrta.org, or visit RTA’s website at http://www.i-riderta.org/rta-connect/on-demand.

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Move to Hamilton, get a “scholarship”: New program gets the city’s endorsement

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 1:21 PM

Stunning aerial view of downtown Hamilton

Hamilton lent its endorsement last week to a program that will pay down the student loans of recent college or trade-school graduates who move into the city.

Hamilton City Council’s 7-0 approval of the program does not authorize the city to administer or spend money on the program, which instead will be run by the Hamilton Community Foundation using money it has or donations for the program. But while the city isn’t participating in the program, leaders are thankful for the community foundation’s efforts, which are expected to draw young, educated people to the city.

The “Talent Attraction Program Scholarships” are competitive.

RELATED: How Hamilton is trying to attract more educated residents: Scholarships

“Definitely, we want to make sure our area colleges are aware of this, so we’ll be communicating with them,” Katie Braswell, vice president of the foundation, told this media outlet.

Applicants cannot live in Hamilton at the time of the application process, which starts March 5.

They must have graduated within the past seven years from a “STEAM” program, meaning Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics. They must have at least $5,000 in outstanding student debt.

They also must move into Hamilton’s urban core, which includes the specific neighborhoods of Downtown/Central Business District, Riverview, German Village, Dayton Lane or Rossville.

Glenn Holmes, a recent employee in Hamilton’s fellowship program, last year told City Council, “Less than two decades ago, at the turn of the century, our poverty rate was only 13 percent. Today more than one in five Hamiltonians live in poverty.”

The solution, he said, is a better-educated population.

MORE: Staffer says Hamilton needs college grads

City Manager Joshua Smith before the vote thanked the community foundation, as well as Jim Cohen of Blue Ash-based CMC Properties, developer of The Marcum project downtown of apartments and businesses, “for really pushing the idea in front of us, to explore further. But without the Hamilton Community Foundation, this would never have happened.”

“Obviously, they’re administering the program, paying for the program, so a huge thank-you to them.”

The program has received wide praise throughout the city’s administration.

“It’s being so popularly received by the entire region,” said Mayor Pat Moeller. “What a great assist by the foundation.”

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Paul Manafort, Rick Gates face new charges: report

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 11:49 AM
Updated: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 12:06 PM

Robert Mueller - Fast Facts

Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump's former campaign manager, and Rick Gates, who served as a campaign aide, are facing new charges in special counsel Robert Mueller's criminal case against the pair, Politico reported Wednesday.

READ MORE: Mueller investigation: Lawyer pleads guilty to lying to investigators in Russia probeWho is Rick Gates and why was he indicted by Robert Mueller? | Who is Paul Manafort, the man indicted in Robert Mueller’s Russian investigation? | What are Paul Manafort and Rick Gates charged with? | MORE

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Rounds of rain, dropping temperatures expected today

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 3:53 AM
Updated: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 11:48 AM

Several rounds of rain may lead to flooding problems this week.

>> Record-breaking warmth this week 

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Rain likely today
  • Several rounds of rain continue into weekend
  • Flood threat lingers 

>> 5-Day Forecast

DETAILED FORECAST

5 Day Forecast with Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs

TODAY: Rain continues through the afternoon, a bit breezy along with falling temperatures. By the end of the afternoon most will be in the upper 30s to low 40s. Drivers should slow down and watch for pockets of heavy rain that could drop visibility. More rain into the evening and overnight. As temperatures fall into the 30s overnight, a few elevated surfaces may become slick by morning. Areas north of I-70 are in the best position to see any slick spots early Thursday as temperatures fall close to freezing. 

>> County-by-County Weather

THURSDAY: Temperatures, especially in the northern Miami Valey, should reach the low to mid 40s. Scattered rain showers in the morning will mix with freezing rain in some spots, however, temperatures will quickly climb to above freezing, limiting any major impact. Road temperature may also stay warm enough to limit problems, but conditions could get slick briefly in some areas. The rest of the day will be dry in most cities as highs reach the upper 40s. 

FRIDAY: Another wave of energy will bring widespread showers back to the Miami Valley. It’ll be breezy with highs in the upper 50s. Rain may fall heavy in some spots, keeping the flood threat elevated for low lying cities, creeks, and streams. 

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

SATURDAY: We’ll see scattered showers at times, especially in the afternoon. A breezy day with highs in the upper 50s. 

SUNDAY: Morning showers come to an end with it being windy and cooler at times as highs peak in the low 50s. These temperatures will drop quickly into the evening. 

WHIO Weather App

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Local pastor reacts to death of Rev. Billy Graham

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 9:34 AM

NEW YORK - JUNE 21:  The Rev. Billy Graham speaks at a news conference about the upcoming Greater New York Billy Graham Crusade June 21, 2005, in New York City. The crusade will most likely be Graham's last mass event in the United States and will be held Friday to Sunday in Flushing Meadows Corona Park.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
NEW YORK - JUNE 21: The Rev. Billy Graham speaks at a news conference about the upcoming Greater New York Billy Graham Crusade June 21, 2005, in New York City. The crusade will most likely be Graham's last mass event in the United States and will be held Friday to Sunday in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)(Mario Tama/Getty Images)

A Springboro pastor called Rev. Billy Graham a “Godly man” and remembered being a part of a crusade in St. Louis.

“I had the privilege of being a part of his crusade in St. Louis in 1999,” said Mark Goins, associate pastor at Newspring Chruch in Springboro. “Always appreciated the fact he lived what he preached.”

PHOTOS: Billy Graham’s last visit to the Dayton area

Graham, who long suffered from cancer, pneumonia and other ailments, died at his home in North Carolina at the age of 99, according to the Associated Press.
RELATED: Evangelist Billy Graham dies at 99

Graham preached to millions across the globe and counseled several presidents during his life.

“He didn’t confine his ministry to just local,” Goins said.  “He had a voice to speak into the lives of leaders.”

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