Patriots parade Lakota school hallways for Veterans Day event

Published: Friday, November 10, 2017 @ 12:44 PM

Military veterans were honored with a parade thru Lakota's Heritage Elementary Friday.

Patriotism proudly paraded the hallways of Lakota’s Heritage Elementary on Friday as military veterans were honored by students.

The long-standing tradition at the Liberty Twp. school is one of the more emotional and popular events each school year, said school officials.

VETERANS DAY 2017: Restaurants offer deals on meals for veterans and active duty service members

“We feel it’s very important for us to honor our veterans and thank them for their service,” said Missy Alexander, principal of Heritage Elementary. “It’s a pretty emotional event. It always brings a tear to my eyes and many other eyes.”

In the last decade such ceremonies at Butler County and other area elementary schools have grown increasingly popular.

School officials often showcase the veterans — many of whom come dressed in military uniform — and tie in their appearance with instructional lessons on American history or American government.

MORE: Butler County Veteran of the Year honored

Friday morning’s events included a school-wide singing of the national anthem and reciting of America’s pledge of allegiance.

The emotions of ceremonies are mutually felt, said Warren Rayburn, Sgt. 1st Class U.S. Army Reserves, who was in uniform as he walked with his daughter through a tunnel of her flag-waving classmates.

“It’s a really good thing to celebrate the veterans and I think it’s a good thing for the veterans to feel the community supports them,” the Liberty Twp. resident said.

“I know in a lot of places we (veterans) don’t get that kind of support, so it’s nice to live in an area where you do get that and it means a lot. And the kids seem very excited about it because it’s a chance for them to see and deal with veterans in and around their community,” Rayburn said.

“Less than 1 percent of all people have served in the military, so some of these kids may not know anybody who has ever served in the military and so it’s a chance to be around those folks and get a comfort level,” he said.

MORE: 2 newcomers win seats on Lakota school board

One of the many appreciative students was Bronson Holland.

“I thought it was pretty cool,” the sixth-grader said. “I think it means to my classmates that this is a day we can celebrate the veterans from different branches of the military that have served our country and protected us.”

Ohio college towns ranked by cost, social scene, opportunities

Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 7:30 AM

Cheryl Schrader, Wright State University's next president, says she will start tackling the college's financial issues right away.

Ohio is home to dozens of universities, but just 10 of the cities those schools call home were recently ranked in the nation’s top 415.

Personal finance website WalletHub ranked America’s college towns by three main factors including “wallet friendliness,” social environment and academic and economic opportunities.

RELATED: Wilberforce U. president takes job at Texas college

The highest ranking Dayton area college town was Oxford, which received the No. 29 overall ranking. The town is home to Miami University.

The next highest rated Ohio college city was Cincinnati, which came in at No. 50 overall, according to WalletHub. Columbus came in at No. 71 followed by Athens at No. 112 and Bowling Green at No. 267.

Dayton, which is home two universities, was ranked No. 345 by WalletHub. Akron was the lowest rated Ohio college town at No. 378.

RELATED: Bad fraternity behavior causing schools to take sweeping action

Ann Arbor, home to the University of Michigan, was ranked No. 1 while Orlando, Fla. came in at No. 2. Rexburg, Idaho took the third place spot, according to WalletHub. Below are the Ohio college towns that made the list:

29. Oxford: Miami University

50. Cincinnati: University of Cincinnati and Xavier University

71. Columbus: Ohio State University

112. Athens: Ohio University

RELATED: Around 1,900 to graduate from Wright State this weekend

267. Bowling Green: Bowling Green State University

325. Kent: Kent State University

332. Cleveland: Cleveland State University and Case Western Reserve University

345. Dayton: University of Dayton and Wright State University

372. Toledo: University of Toledo

378. Akron: University of Akron

Students walk between class periods on the campus of Miami University in Oxford, Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. GREG LYNCH / STAFF(Staff Writer)

Good Samaritan Hospital closing will stress EMS transport system, Dayton chief says

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 10:41 PM

Dayton Fire Director and Chief Jeffrey L. Payne
Dayton Fire Director and Chief Jeffrey L. Payne

Premier Health's decision to close Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton by the end of the year will stress the city fire department's emergency transport system, but the issue will be regional issue in terms of emergency medical service response and transport, Dayton Fire Chief Jeffrey Payne said.

"It will leave a little bit of a void in coverage for emergency rooms we can transport to," he said of the Dayton Fire Department, but "we should still be able to get patients to the hospital within five minutes or so, for the most part." 

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The closing of Good Samaritan will mean longer transport times, which will stress the Dayton Fire Department's system, the chief said, noting, "this could be problematic, but I think it's something we can handle." 

The protocols -- official procedures or a system of rules under which all hospitals and fire departments operate -- call for taking patients to the closest hospital. 

Payne said, "The most important message we need the public to understand is that regardless of which hospital you go to ... whether it's Miami Valley, Kettering, Grandview, the VA , Wright-Patt, they all operate under the same protocols to make sure you get swift, efficient and effective patient care." 

He warned that the void left by the hospital's closing will be a regional issue, not just a city of Dayton issue, in terms of EMS response and transport because there are a number of fire departments that normally transport to Good Samaritan Hospital. 

Payne stopped his comments there, saying he didn't want to speak for those other fire departments.

Boston University study finds repeated hits to the head can cause CTE, without concussions

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 10:27 PM

Youth football players. (Photo: Boston25News.com)
Youth football players. (Photo: Boston25News.com)

Kimberly Archie was pleased to hear about the new findings on chronic brain injuries released by Boston University on Thursday. 

>> Read more trending news

Doctors at BU have found constant hits to young athletes – even without concussions – cause Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, or CTE. 

Archie says this better explains how her son died.

“I think it's great that peer-reviewed research has finally caught up to what a lot of us have known for a long time,” she told Boston 25 News. “And it seemed very suspect the way he died because the behavior was so erratic.”

Archie says her son died at age 24 from reckless driving that seemed suicidal, but she didn't understand why, until she had his brain autopsied and found he suffered from CTE after playing football from age 7 to 15.

“My son never had any brain injuries or what a lot of people like to call a concussion,” Archie said. 

The new research could change the way some sports are played. The athletic director at Walpole High School says he already plans to talk to coaches about the findings from BU, to find ways players can avoid those dangerous hits.

Ron Dowd says the new findings that hard hits can cause brain damage in several sports at a young age -- makes sense. 

“The more education, the more proof that you have is always better, you're always looking to improve” Dowd said. 

He plans to work with coaches to show players how to make tackles and plays without injuring their brain.

“You can still encompass techniques and so forth, still get your point across and not be slamming heads,” he said. 

Dowd says game rules could also be changed in the future to prevent CTE after this new research.

Archie hopes the new research helps other families avoid the loss she's had.

“It's different once you have the proof and you look back, then it becomes crystal clear,” she said.

3-month-old girl exposed to heroin, taken to hospital

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 10:17 PM

Crystal Cumberland. (Photo: WPXI.com)
Crystal Cumberland. (Photo: WPXI.com)

Police arrested a woman after they say she exposed her baby to fentanyl.

>> Read more trending news

But she told investigators that's not the drug she thought she was using.

The baby had to be flown to Children's Hospital from Uniontown.

Crystal Cumberland is in jail and facing charges including aggravated assault and endangering the welfare of a child.

According to Pennsylvania State Police in Fayette County, in November, the baby girl had to be given several doses of Narcan to revive her.

At the time, investigators thought the baby overdosed on heroin, but according to a criminal complaint, Cumberland "admitted to hospital staff to snorting a white powder to get high, which exposed the infant to fentanyl that was sold as heroin."