Ohio House leader who criticized WSU to speak at commencement

Published: Friday, April 21, 2017 @ 2:29 PM


            Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger will serve as WSU’s spring commencement speaker.
Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger will serve as WSU’s spring commencement speaker.

Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger will serve as Wright State University’s spring commencement speaker, just a year after he warned legislators about working with the school.

Rosenberger, a 2012 WSU graduate, will speak at the commencement ceremony set for 10 a.m., April 29 in the Nutter Center, said board of trustees chairman Michael Bridges said today. Rosenberger, R-Clarksville, is a 2012 WSU graduate.

“My thing is going to be about congratulating the students and wishing them well,” Rosenberger said, quickly adding that he told Wright State officials that he would also address recent administrative problems at the university. “It was expressed to me that they would have it no other way.”

Rosenberger said graduating students and their families trusted Wright State and future students need to be able to have that trust as well so the university can continue to serve its mission.

RELATED: Rosenberger warns legislators to use caution in dealing with Wright State

Rosenberger said he is glad to see course corrections are being made at the university. Early last year, he told the Dayton Daily News that he advised his fellow lawmakers when dealing with WSU: “I said use caution on everything because clearly they can’t handle themselves right now.”

Then-WSU president David Hopkins said he was “deeply saddened” by Rosenberger’s comments. Hopkins resigned as president just over a month ago.

RELATED: From Wright State University to House Speaker

Since Rosenberger’s 2016 remarks, Wright State’s fortunes have not improved much.

The school must cut $25 million form its next budget in order to regain financial footing. Layoffs and budget cuts are expected to be announced later this spring.

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Donald Trump: Only modern president without pets in the White House

Published: Sunday, October 22, 2017 @ 10:45 PM

WASHINGTON - MARCH 15:  U.S. President Barack Obama greets his dog Bo outside the Oval Office of the White House March 15, 2012 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Martin H. Simon-Pool/Getty Images)
Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON - MARCH 15: U.S. President Barack Obama greets his dog Bo outside the Oval Office of the White House March 15, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Martin H. Simon-Pool/Getty Images)(Pool/Getty Images)

The Trump White House is likely to become known for many things, but cute and cuddly is apparently not one of them. Breaking from tradition, the First Family has not welcomed pets into their lair.

>> Read more trending news

"There are no plans at this time" to add animals to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Communications Director Stephanie Grisham told CNN. That would make the Trumps "the only first family in modern presidential history without a pet," CNN says.

Ivanka Trump wrote about her ex-husband's ambivalence toward her poodle, Chappy, in her memoir, Raising Trump. Chappy "had an equal dislike of Donald," she was also quoted as saying.

In recent times, dogs have been the most common furry friend at the White House. Who doesn't remember the Portuguese water dogs, Bo and Sunny, who frolicked with the Obamas, or the many mutts of the Bush presidents. George W. Bush's dog, Spot, was born at the White House, the offspring of Millie, during George H.W. Bush's administration. George W. and Laura also had terriers, Miss Beazley and Barney, famous for his "Barney Cam" videos.

But the history of First Family pets is also full of unusual sidekicks, from James Buchanan's elephants to Martin Van Buren's tiger cubs, according to CNN. Though unconfirmed, legend has it that John Quincy Adams had an alligator.

Many of these more unusual animals were gifts. First families with young children often went more traditional, taking full advantage of the benefits of living at America's most famous residence.

The Kennedy White House included a pony, horses, hamsters, dogs, parakeets, a canary, a rabbit and a cat. Pets "help create an atmosphere of the White House as a family, a lived-in place and not just a stiff museum, but a place where a family lives and plays and enjoys each other's company," the chief historian at the White House Historical Association, Ed Lengel, told CNN.

But it's not like the Trump administration is bereft of pet-lovers. Vice President Mike Pence and Karen Pence keep a menagerie at their nearby home at the U.S. Naval Observatory.

Their rabbit, Marlon Bundo, is a social media star with his own Instagram account. One of their longtime cats, Oreo, recently passed away but they've since added a new kitten, Hazel, who joins another feline, Pickles. The family's beloved 13-year-old beagle, Maverick, died days before the election. But an Australian shepherd puppy, Harley, has happily joined the family. 
More famous First Family pets 
• Thomas Jefferson: A mockingbird and several bear cubs.
• Woodrow Wilson: A flock of sheep and a ram, who grazed the White House lawn.
• William Taft: A Holstein cow named Pauline.
• Warren Harding: Laddie Boy, an Airedale terrier who had his own chair in the Roosevelt Room for Cabinet meetings.
• Calvin Coolidge: First Lady Grace Coolidge had an opossum and a raccoon, which she walked on a leash.
• Theodore Roosevelt: Nearly 30 pets, including his bulldog, Pete, famous for tearing the pants off the French ambassador.
• Richard Nixon: Checkers the cocker spaniel.
• Jimmy Carter: Daughter Amy had a Siamese cat named Misty Malarky Ying Yang. 
• Ronald Reagan: Rex, a King Charles spaniel.
• Bill Clinton: Socks the cat.

U.S. 42 reopens following double-fatal motorcycle crash in Greene Co.

Published: Sunday, October 22, 2017 @ 7:15 PM
Updated: Sunday, October 22, 2017 @ 11:47 PM

FROM THE SCENE: Spring Valley fatal crash

UPDATE @ 11:51 p.m.

Our crew at the scene reports U.S. 42 has reopened at Spring Valley Paintersville Road following a double-fatal motorcycle crash.

We are working to learn the identities of the victims and the cause of the crash.

UPDATE @ 10:05 p.m.

A man and woman from Xenia were killed after the motorcycle they were riding collided with a Dodge Charger in Spring Valley Sunday night, according to troopers.

U.S. 42 remains closed as crash investigators work to learn the cause of the crash and the party responsible, our crew reports.

Troopers said the victims on the motorcycle, both in their mid-20s, were wearing helmets at the time of the crash a third victim in the Dodge is recovering from non-life-threatening injuries.

A third female victim in the Dodge was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

>>Man in critical condition after motorcycle crash in Greene Co.

A preliminary investigation reveals the motorcyclist was northbound on U.S. 42 when the driver of the car attempted to turn onto the highway from Spring Valley Paintersville Road.

Troopers said at this time speed and failure to yield are being considered causes, but a definitive answer will not be available until investigators are finished.

A crashed motorcycle at the scene of a fatal crash on U.S. 42 and Spring Valley Paintersville Road in Spring Valley Sunday night. DeAngelo Byrd/Staff

UPDATE @ 9:13 p.m.

Two people are dead after the motorcycle they were riding crashed on U.S. 42 in Greene County, according to troopers at the scene. 

Our crew is told both victims were wearing helmets at the time of the crash. 

>>CareFlight called to Greene Co. motorcycle crash

A woman riding in a black Dodge Charger involved in the crash was taken to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries. 

U.S. 42 is closed at its intersection with Spring Valley Paintersville Road as an investigation continues

Our crew remains at the scene and is working to learn what caused the crash.

UPDATE @ 7:58 p.m.

At least one person is dead following a motorcycle crash in Spring Valley Sunday night, according to our crew at the scene. 

A motorcycle and black car can be seen near the intersection of U.S. 42 and Spring Valley Paintersville Road. 

Initial reports indicate a call to CareFlight was cancelled after crews arrived at the scene. 

U.S. 42 has been closed at its intersection with Spring Valley Paintersville Road as troopers investigate.

We are working to confirm multiple details with deputies in this developing story.

EARLIER REPORT

CareFlight has been requested to the scene of a motorcycle crash in Greene County. 

Crews were dispatched on a report of a crash involving a car and motorcycle just after 7 p.m. at the intersection of U.S. 42 and Spring Valley Paintersville Road. 

Initial reports indicate a motorcyclist on scene has been seriously injured. 

We have a crew heading to the scene as we work to learn more.

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Vegetables sold at Walmart, Trader Joe's recalled for Listeria

Published: Sunday, October 22, 2017 @ 9:43 PM

Mann Packing recalled various vegetable products over Listeria concerns. (Photo: Food and Drug Administration)
Mann Packing recalled various vegetable products over Listeria concerns. (Photo: Food and Drug Administration)

Mann Packing is voluntarily recalling various vegetable products sold at Walmart, Trader Joe's and Target over concerns of Listeria monocytogenes, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

The company said “a single positive” test result in random sampling by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency sparked the decision to issue the recall notice. Listeria infection can cause fever, diarrhea, flu-like symptoms and even miscarriages.

"As an owner of this company and a mom, providing safe and healthy foods to our consumers and their families is always our top priority," Gina Nucci, director of corporate marketing, said in a release.

The recall includes Brussels sprouts, broccoli and vegetable medley products distributed throughout the United States and Canada with “best if used by” dates from Oct. 11 to 20.

Affected items include:

  • Walmart 12-oz. bags of broccoli cauliflower florets, broccoli florets and stir fry medley, 32-oz. bags of broccoli florets, 16-oz. bags of broccoli slaw, 10-ounce bags of cauliflower florets and super blend, 6/16-oz. bags of cauliflower and 2-lb. bags of vegetable medley.

  • Trader Joe's, 10-ounce bags of kohlrabi salad blend.

  • Archer Farms 12-oz. bags of broccoli slaw, broccoli cauliflower florets, broccoli medley and brussels sprouts, 9-oz. bags of shaved brussels sprouts and 10-oz. bags of cauliflower florets.

Aldi supermarkets also issued recall notices for Mann products.

Echoing Reagan, Trump pushes Congress to act swiftly on tax reform

Published: Sunday, October 22, 2017 @ 10:05 PM

Pushing the House to take another step this week on the road to major tax reforms, President Donald Trump used an op-ed in USA Today to argue that GOP tax plans will “ignite America’s middle class miracle once again,” as he channeled former President Ronald Reagan, saying with “tax reform, we can make it morning in America again.”

“Revising our tax code is not just a policy discussion — it is a moral one, because we are not talking about the government’s money – we are talking about your money, your hard work,” the President wrote.

Mr. Trump meanwhile used a conference call with House Republicans on Sunday to make much the same argument – that now is the time for action on tax reform.

Here is where things stand on Capitol Hill when it comes to GOP plans to move legislation on tax reform.

1. The budget comes first for the GOP. Before they can focus solely on tax reform, Republicans must approve a non-binding budget outline for 2018, which would authorize expedited action on a tax bill – without the threat of a Senate filibuster. The Senate approved their plan last Thursday, and now the House seems ready to accept that this week, though the budget details are sure to give some GOP fiscal hawks some heartburn, as the plan would not ensure a balanced budget within ten years. But GOP leaders are basically telling rank and file Republicans that now is the time for tax reform, and that there is no use in getting caught up in a battle over budget cuts. Look for the House to vote later this week.

2. But ‘what if’ the House refuses to go along? If enough Republicans refuse to vote for the Senate-passed budget, then there would have to be formal House-Senate negotiations, which could take some time to hash out a deal on the budget resolution for 2018. That would obviously delay work on tax reform, and make it that much more difficult to swiftly get a tax bill moving on Capitol Hill. It seems unlikely that will happen, as more conservative lawmakers have been assured they will get votes on measures dealing with budget savings. But it is safe to say that the ‘normal’ Republican focus on budget deficits has melted away now that the GOP is in charge of the White House and Congress. Here is the sales pitch being made by the Republican Study Group, which says Speaker Paul Ryan has promised votes on some budget-related bills.

3. Let’s assume the House approves the budget – then what? If the House heeds the advice of President Trump, and votes for the Senate-passed budget outline this week, then the focus will shift to the tax-writing committees of the House and Senate – the House Ways and Means Committee, and the Senate Finance Committee, as they produce an actual tax reform bill. Remember – we don’t have a bill as yet from the White House – just some bullet points. In 1985, President Reagan sent Congress an actual 489 page bill as a starting point. President Trump’s bullet points are just a small piece of a much larger bill that is expected to be released by Republicans, as the scrums of reporters grow each day for key lawmakers, like Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), the Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

4. What’s the possible timing on tax reform? Ask veterans of Capitol Hill what they think about a GOP tax plan, and they cannot imagine it getting done this year (or even at all). But the White House and GOP leaders in Congress keep talking about doing it fast, maybe having a vote in the House before a Thanksgiving break, and a Senate vote in December. If we go back and look at the tax reform timeline in the Reagan Administration, it took a lot longer. The House Ways and Means Committee started work on a draft bill in late September 1985 – it took two months to finish. The deal almost fell apart in December, as the House voted to approve that plan just before Christmas. In the Senate, it took six months to get the bill out of committee and to a vote, in June 1986. In other words, Republicans think they can move at legislative warp speed compared to thirty one years ago in the Congress.

5. Remember, there are a lot of details involved. If you are going to do just tax cuts, that’s pretty straightforward. But if you are going to try to do sweeping tax reform – for both the individual and corporate sides – that is very complicated. Just look back at 1986, and you can see that bill is filled with rifle-shot provisions intended to help just one company or group. Back then, there was no way to get this out to the voters. But with the internet and social media, these types of provisions will get a lot of attention and scrutiny.

6. One more thought on timing – from 1986. As I write this on October 22, it is 31 years to the day that President Reagan signed the Tax Reform Act into law. But I clearly remembered the final agreement being struck in August – and the vote taking place soon after Labor Day. My memory was correct. So, why did it take another month for the President to sign the bill into law? For one, there were a number of errors in the final agreement, which needed to be fixed. So, on September 25, 1986, the House passed H. Con. Res. 395, to make “technical and clerical” corrections in the final bill. The Senate took that up a few weeks later, and made some changes, which were sent back to the House. The House made a few more changes. But no final resolution was agreed to, as the Congress adjourned for the year on October 18, 1986. So, four days later, the President signed the bill into law anyway. Want to do some more reading about what happened in 1986? Here you go:

And by the way, that explanation of the 1986 Tax Reform Act runs almost 1,400 pages. Happy reading!