Summit Academy Community School - Dayton,

Ohio announces first set of medical marijuana growers

Published: Friday, November 03, 2017 @ 11:53 AM
Updated: Friday, November 03, 2017 @ 12:50 PM

What to know about the legalization of medical marijuana in Ohio

Operations in Dayton and Huber Heights were included among the 11 Level II medical marijuana licenses announced Friday by the state of Ohio, but there remains some uncertainty whether either site will be state-approved to grow pot.

Two companies submitted applications for multiple locations, but can choose only one under state rules. That means Ohio Clean Leaf LLC has 10 days to decide whether to pick from its proposed sites in Dayton and Carroll in Fairfield County.

The Huber Heights site also could get rejected, but for a different reason. The city has a ban on marijuana-grow operations.

RELATED: Ohio passes bill to legalize medical marijuana

Although Paragon Development Group, LLC, won a Level II license for an operation in Huber Heights, it will have to abide by all local zoning restrictions and laws, said Ohio Department of Commerce spokeswoman Stephanie Gostomski.

Jason Wilson, Paragon’s chief security officer, said the company is working to finalize a deal to shift the location to a city in Miami County.

“I’m ecstatic about it. I think it’s great,” he said of the news that Paragon was awarded one of the coveted licenses.

Friday’s announcement was anxiously awaited by the 76 applicants vying for up to 12 Level II licenses, which allow cultivation on up to 3,000 square feet.

Another 109 entities are seeking Level I licenses, which allow for cultivation up to 25,000 square feet.

Level I license awards will be announced in the coming weeks, though no target date has been set, Gostomski said.

Among the other area sites named in the Level II licenses were one in Monroe and one in Wilmington.

MAP: Where medical marijuana could be grown in Ohio

Here is the list:

  • Fire Rock Ltd., which will pick one of three locations identified — Columbus, Canton or Akron;
  • FN Group Holdings, LLC, Ravenna, Portage County;
  • Mother Grows Best, LLC, Canton, Stark County;
  • OhiGrow, LLC, Toledo, Lucas County;
  • Ancient Roots, LLC, Wilmington, Clinton County;
  • Ohio Clean Leaf, LLC, which will pick either Dayton or Carroll location;
  • Ascension BioMedical, LLC, Oberlin, Lorain County;
  • Agri-Med Ohio, LLC, Langsville, Meigs County;
  • Paragon Development Group, LLC, Huber Heights;
  • Hemma, LLC, Monroe, Butler County;
  • Galenas, LLC, Akron, Summit County.

Applicants were scored based on their business, operations, quality assurance, security and financial plans, according to state commerce department officials.

Brian Wright of the Ohio Cannabis Association called Friday’s announcement “very exciting.”

“There were clearly many strong applicants and these selections for the Level II licenses reflect the best of the best,” Wright wrote in a written statement. “We are looking forward to working with them, our state leadership and the hundreds of thousands of Ohioans who will be able to have safe access to the medical treatments they need.”

More about the organizations selected for Level II licenses on Friday:

Ohio Clean Leaf: Seven owners with backgrounds in farming, rental property, trucking, investments and legal marijuana cultivation formed Ohio Clean Leaf. The company is under contract to purchase an industrial warehouse at 2046 Valley Street in Dayton. But it also has the option to set up shop at 3560 Dolson Street in Carroll. The ownership includes multiple members of the Landis family, who have run a hog and crop farm as well as a trucking company.

Paragon: Five managers, including four from the Miami Valley, formed the company. Chief Executive Re’Shanda Grace-Bridges, who runs a home-based travel agency, is director of new student programs at University of Dayton. Melinda Warthman, the compliance officer, is an adjunct instructor at UD. The company expects to pay $12 an hour, plus benefits. Paragon is working with a management company with experience in another state with legal marijuana. It plans to produce four strains: Float, Calm, Motivate, and Happy. It expects to be able to begin cultivation within six months.

Hemma: Two Cincinnati women — Elizabeth Van Dulman and Megan Arata — together own nearly two-thirds of the company while 10 other owners hold minor stakes. Van Dulman is a real estate agent and entrepreneur while Arata is a yoga and pilates instructor who owns a multi-faceted wellness center. The company is under contract to purchase 100 Edison Drive in Monroe and plans to create at least 10 jobs that pay above minimum wage. Hemma also plans to apply for a medical marijuana processor’s license from the state.

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Dayton traffic from the WHIO Traffic Center

Published: Friday, March 02, 2018 @ 2:52 AM
Updated: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 1:14 AM

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • None to report.

Surface Street Incidents:

  • None to report.

>> RELATED: WHIO App-Winter

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 


  • Arlington Road between Pleasant Plain and Upper Lewisburg Salem Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE, March 5 - Sept. 30. All ramps for I-70 will remain open. 
  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • SR 48 between First Street and Riverdale Street, Lane closures March 19 - April 1. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west, RAMP CLOSURE, March 12 - Sept. 30. The official detour is: I-75 north to US 35 east to Jefferson/Main Street to Ludlow Street to US 35 west. 
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west and east, Lane width restriction until Apr. 1, 2018. One lane will remain open on the ramp with a width of 11 feet.


  • N. Market Street between Foss Way/Kirk Lane and Stonyridge Avenue, ROAD CLOSURE March 5 at 7 a.m. - Aug. 10 at 5 p.m. 


  • SR 47 between Fifth Avenue and Wilkinson Avenue, Lane closures Jan. 21 - Nov. 27. One lane will remain open in each direction at all times. 


  • SR 121 between Washington Street and Fairview Street, ROAD CLOSURE Mar. 12 - April 13. The official detour is: SR 722 to US 127 to SR 503. 
  • SR 121 between Arnold Street and Harter Road, ROAD CLOSURE Mar. 12 - April 13. The official detour is: SR 722 to US 127 to SR 503. 


  • I-70 east Ramp to I-675 north, RAMP CLOSURE March 15 - Aug. 15. The official detour is: I-70 east to I-675 south to SR 444 to I-675 north


  • US 68 between SR 508 and Township Road 310, ROAD CLOSURE April 23 - 27. The official detour is: US 68 to SR 296 to SR 29 to SR 235 to SR 47 to US 68. 

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Kettering residents can learn about neighborhood crime with a mouse click

Published: Monday, March 19, 2018 @ 11:23 PM

Lyn Grant has gotten comfortable during the nearly 40 years she has lived in Kettering.

But she's not naive enough to allow her comfort to lull her into unrealistic feelings of safety. 

"I've notice the neighborhood changing a little bit," Grant told News Center 7's Lauren Clark on Monday evening. "We had a car stolen once." 

To keep tabs on her neighborhood and its surroundings, Grant said she'll probably make use of a new online  crime-mapping tool the police department is offering in partnership with LexisNexis Risk Solutions "to be aware, to be on the lookout." 

The tool, Community Crime Map, makes information easily available for Grant and her neighbors who want to monitor crime. 

According to Kettering police officials, Grant and people like her inspired the department to partner with LexisNexis to create the crime-mapping tool. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Find out what happened to resident who shot an intruder

It's easy to use: 

 * Either enter your ZIP code or select OH-Kettering from the pull down list of communities 

 * You can also search by date range and event 

 * All incidents in the area you select will display on the map by type of crime 

 * The Data Grid tab displays crime information by incident type, date, location 

 * The Analytics tab displays graphs and charts of crimes by type, by day of the week and time of day 

 * In the top right corner of the page, you can sign up for daily, weekly or monthly crime alerts by incident type 

Residents also can sign up to receive crime alerts and neighborhood watch email reports of recent crimes from the police department. 

Miami Twp. recently contracted with LexisNexis to provide the service. Troy in Miami County and Bellbrook in Greene County are doing the same. 

If your community has partnered with LexisNexis, you too can find out crime data for where you live.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to

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Keyless ignitions may be contributing to deaths across the United States

Published: Monday, March 19, 2018 @ 11:34 PM

(Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)
(Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)

Constance Petot didn't think twice about the push button starter on her car until it almost killed her and her toddler last Valentine's Day.

>> Read more trending news

"He just went completely limp in my arms. It's the most terrifying moment in my entire life," said Petot.

The busy mom was ending her work day with a conference call as she was pulling into the garage of her parents' Florida home, where she was staying.

"As I came in I wanted the garage door to be closed when the conference call started so I went ahead and pushed the button to close the door," Petot said. "And I think in my head I just told myself I had pushed this button instead of that button."

The mistake sent carbon monoxide, an odorless, colorless gas, flooding through their home as she got 13-month-old Parker ready for bed.

The car was still on after Petot left the garage.

"My son woke up around 12:30 a.m. and was screaming," Petot recalls.

She got out of bed to pick him up.

Petot thinks her son, Parker, may have had a headache because she now knows the level of carbon monoxide at the time was high enough to have killed them within about 20 minutes.

"Once I got dizzy, I knew I needed to get out of there," Petot said. "And walked down the stairs, opened the garage door and saw that the taillight was on."

A WSB-TV investigation has tracked more than two dozen injuries and deaths around the country connected to cars with keyless ignitions being left on, with families left wondering how this could happen.

Cars with keyless ignition have no key and are designed to start with the push of a button. But it is also easier to forget to turn off the car.

The family of Bill Thomason and Eugenia (Woo) Thomason say the couple likely never realized their mistake. Their Toyota Avalon ran inside their closed garage for 32 hours as they slept.

"We know that they went to bed that night and didn't wake up the next morning," said Will Thomason, who now lives in Atlanta.

His brother Dave Thomason also lives in the metro area, and they both rushed to Greenville, South Carolina, to get to their parents, but it was too late.

"By the time they were found they were essentially brain dead," said Will Thomason. "You can't prepare for something like this."

The sons say the active retirees had just renewed their wedding vows after 50 years and adored their five grandchildren, who they won't get to see grow up.

"Oh, it's been just absolutely terrible," said Dave Thomason. "We all know that people can get killed in car accidents due to different things, but a car sitting alone, basically doing nothing but running?"

The brothers said their pain is worsened by the number of times they've now heard the same story, with reported deaths and injuries connected to running cars around the country.

The Thomason family has filed a lawsuit against Toyota, which has already settled with several of the other families.

"Hell yeah, that makes me angry. I mean, we've lost our parents," said Will Thomason.

"Nobody is in the car, it's been running for however long. The car should have an automatic cutoff. I mean, to me that's a very easy fix," said Dave Thomason.

Records show since 2011 the federal government has been studying the need for an external alert to be placed on cars that have button ignitions, but has yet to require car companies to do anything to include an external alert.

"There's probably 25 other things that car makers do ... for safety. Well, this is a life and death safety thing and it seems to me that this is an easy thing for them to address, and they aren't addressing it," Will Thomason said.

WSB-TV tested more than a dozen of the most popular cars to see what happens when you leave them running and walk away with the key fob.

Most of the cars had a dashboard display that notes that the key fob has left the vehicle. Some even emit a low interior sound, similar to the one that reminds drivers to fasten their seat belts. 

However, if a driver has left the vehicle, he or she wouldn't see that display or hear that warning. Very few of the cars made an exterior noise.

The loudest warning came from the Chevy Impala, which utilizes the car's horn.

Petot didn't hear the three low beeps her car made and she's lived with the guilt ever since.

"I absolutely take responsibility for what happened," she said. "And I think that it could happen to anybody."

But she said the price for being distracted or forgetful should not be death.

"We were incredibly lucky. We absolutely wouldn't be here," Petot said while watching Parker play in their new Marietta home. "He is definitely my little hero Valentine."

Petot said the day they moved in to their new home she purchased carbon monoxide detectors for each of the rooms.

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Red Ink Rising – National debt goes over $21 trillion

Published: Monday, March 19, 2018 @ 8:44 PM

A week after the feds announced the largest budget deficit in February in six years, the national debt edged over $21 trillion for the first time ever on Monday, as budget experts argue the U.S. is on a track that will likely again feature yearly deficits of $1 trillion, a level reached only during the Obama Administration.

“This is unsustainable,” said Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI).

The $21 trillion debt milestone was hit as lawmakers in Congress were trying to place the finishing touches on a giant Omnibus funding bill which will increase deficits by well over $100 billion in 2018, because of extra spending approved for both domestic and defense accounts.

Even before that, budget watchdogs were warning of a new tide of red ink in the Trump Administration.

“Thanks to the recent budget-busting tax cuts and spending deal, the national debt is skyrocketing and on an unsustainable course,” said Maya MacGuineas, head of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

The February budget numbers had two main reasons why the monthly deficit jumped to $215 billion – up from $192 billion in 2017 – less revenue coming in to Uncle Sam, and more spending.

Tax revenues were $155 billion in February, down from $171 billion a year ago.

While deficits are heading back up, there’s no hint of action in the Congress on any plan to restrain spending, though only a handful GOP lawmakers publicly grumbled about the situation, as they waited to see what exactly was in the Omnibus.

But the Omnibus has become almost a normal spending tool for Congress, unable to get through the dozen yearly spending bills on time.

For the current 2018 Fiscal Year, lawmakers were supposed to have finished 12 funding measures by October 1 of last year – but that spending work has only been completed on time in four of the last 43 years – one reason there are calls to overhaul the system.

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