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Posted: 8:50 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, 2012

Ohioans remember Armstrong as quiet presence in region

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Ohioans remember Armstrong as quiet presence in region photo
Chris Stewart
Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon and a native of Ohio, died Saturday, Aug. 25, at age 82.
Ohioans remember Armstrong as quiet presence in region photo
Alex Brandon
President Barack Obama talks with Apollo astronaut Neil Armstrong in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, July 20, 2009, on the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing. Armstrong died Saturday, Aug. 25, of complications after heart surgery.
Ohioans remember Armstrong as quiet presence in region photo
Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon and a native of Ohio, died Saturday, Aug. 25, at age 82.
Ohioans remember Armstrong as quiet presence in region photo
Sandy Fuston gets a scoop of ice cream for a customer at the Village Ice Cream Parlor Saturday, Aug. 25, in Lebanon. Fuston’s mother, Phyllis Hartsock, who owned the parlor while Neil Armstrong lived in Lebanon, served him many times. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, lived in Lebanon for years after the moon landing and ate many times at The Village Ice Cream Parlor on South Broadway Street.
Ohioans remember Armstrong as quiet presence in region photo
Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, lived for years in Lebanon and often patronized The Village Ice Cream Parlor on South Broadway Street.
Ohioans remember Armstrong as quiet presence in region photo
Chris Burton, executive director of the Armstrong Air & Space museum in Wapakoneta, recalled Neil Armstrong as a man who publicly spoke only when he thought it was necessary and was always involved with encouraging children’s interests in engineering and space.

By Tom Beyerlein

Staff Writer

“He used to come in for lunch and would sit at the counter. All of the businessmen would eat in the balcony, and I told him he should go eat with them and he said, ‘They never asked me to.’ He wasn’t very talkative, but a real gentleman and very nice.”

- Phyllis Hartsock, owner of the Village Ice Cream Parlor, on Neil Armstrong’s reserved demeanor

“He liked to call himself an aeronatutical engineer. When he wasn’t out flying spaceships he was doing a lot of aeronautical research.”

- Timothy R. Gaffney, a trustee with the United States Air and Trade Show and former aviation writer for the Dayton Daily News.

“It’s going to be hundreds of years before we do something as incredible as landing on the moon,” Lane said. “His will be a name that goes on forever when so so many others will be forgotten.”

- Amanda Wright Lane, the great grand niece of the Wright brothers and friend to Armstrong.

“He was an individual who never lost never lost his temper, never lost his composure. He was a guy that would describe himself as being the geeky engineer with white socks and the pocket protector. But he was a person who was absolutely never rattled by anything.”

- Tony Sculimbrene, executive director of the National Aviation Heritage Alliance, who worked with Armstrong on a number of events.

“I remember most my parents’ excitement and fear while they watched the landing on the black and white TV. School kids from all over this area come through the museum. They all look up to him.”

- Traci Richards, Celina, visiting Sunday at the Neil Armstrong Air and Space Museum off Interstate-75 in Wapakoneta.

“As long as there are history books, Neil Armstrong will be included in them, remembered for taking humankind’s first small step on a world beyond our own.”

- NASA chief Charles Bolden.

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