New Mediterranean restaurant now open at Mall at Fairfield Commons

Published: Thursday, March 16, 2017 @ 12:59 PM

            This 2008 image of a gyro is a staff file photo by Teesha McClam
This 2008 image of a gyro is a staff file photo by Teesha McClam

A new Mediterranean restaurant specializing in gyros opened this week in the Mall at Fairfield Commons in Beavercreek.

Gyro King moved into food-court space that previously housed Designer Dogs, which shut down in September 2016 after nine months in business.

Gyro King owner M. Ghiath Al-Edlbi could not be reached this morning, March 16, but when the restaurant was under development in January, the eatery’s founder told this news outlet that he had been interested in opening a restaurant serving Mediterranean cuisine “for some time now.

“When I saw the available space in the food court, I quickly acted to not miss the opportunity.”

EARLIER: Another new restaurant coming to Mall at Fairfield Commons

The restaurant founder said Gyro King’s menu would include “beef gyro, chicken gyro (known as shawarma as well), falafel, traditional soups and salads, platters, and Gyro salad bowls, along with traditional sweets.”

Mall officials announced yesterday, March 15 that Sbarro would be returning to the mall’s food court after a three-year absence.

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Senate approves $1.3 trillion spending bill

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 12:55 AM
Updated: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 1:11 AM

Congress passed a $1.3 trillion spending bill early Friday morning.
Pool/Getty Images
Congress passed a $1.3 trillion spending bill early Friday morning.(Pool/Getty Images)

The Senate approved a $1.3 trillion spending measure early Friday morning, The New York Times reported.

>> Read more trending news

The Senate voted 65-32 in favor of the measure, which will keep the federal government open through September;

On Thursday, the House passed the bill by a 256-167 margin.

The measure, which was 2,232 pages in length, was passed less than 24 hours after it had been introduced, the Times reported.

The bill now goes to President Donald Trump for his approval.

The legislation will increase funding for the military and more domestic spending, CNN reported.

The spending package also includes money to fight the opioid epidemic and fund more than $21 billion in infrastructure projects, CNN reported.

The bill does not address the fate of young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as children and have been shielded from deportation by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the Times reported.

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Crews respond to a reported shooting in Trotwood

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 12:32 AM

Crews are responding to the 4700 block of Knollcroft Road in Trotwood on a reported shooting that occurred early Friday morning.

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Two suspected metal thieves caught red-handed at Hewitt Soap Factory

The incident was dispatched around 12:20 a.m., per initial reports.

We will continue to update this story with more details. 

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Police: 2 suspected metal thieves caught red-handed at Hewitt Soap Factory

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 11:17 PM

Jacob Schiessler, left, and Scott Schiessler
Jacob Schiessler, left, and Scott Schiessler(MONTGOMERY COUNTY JAIL)

>>PHOTOS: Fire at Hewitt Soap Factory

A Tipp City man told police he was nearly run over this evening after he tried to confront two suspected metal thieves.

The 56-year-old man dialed 911 to report a theft in progress around 5 p.m. at the old Hewitt Soap Factory, 300 Linden Ave.

He said he was on his way home from work when he saw a red pickup truck on the property. He walked up to the truck to get its license plate number when he spotted a man later identified as Jacob Schiessler come out of a vacant building, and saw another man, later identified as Scott Schiessler, load metal into the bed of the pickup, according to a Dayton police report.

How the wind affected firefighters' job at Hewitt Soap factory

>> Man tells officer: ‘I’ll bite your nose off and spit it in your face’ during arrest

The man said when he confronted the men about the theft, Jacob Schiessler threatened him and he backed away at the urging of the 911 operator.

Then, he said Jacob Schiessler got into the driver’s seat of the pickup, accelerated and tried to run him owner. The victim said he was able to run out of the way to avoid being struck, the report stated.

Police found the pickup at First Street Recycling, 1400 E. First St.

The victim identified Jacob and Scott Schiessler as the men involved in the incident at the Linden Avenue site, the report stated. 

Firefighters continues to douse the hot spots of the old Hewitt Soap Factory fire that erupted early Friday morning.

Both men were booked into the Montgomery County Jail on suspicion of felony breaking and entering, and Jacob Schiessler also faces a felonious assault charge. They are due to be arraigned Friday afternoon in Dayton Municipal Court, online jail records show.

The old Hewitt Soap Factory ceased operation in 2004. It had a massive fire Dec. 22, 2016, that destroyed a building at the facility constructed in 1897. A second large fire erupted Nov. 10, 2017, this time at a three-story building on the site’s northern side.

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Top AF leader: ‘You have to learn to say, that’s not good enough’

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 10:30 PM

Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson addressed more than 240 graduates of the Air Force Institute of Technology on Thursday evening at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. BARRIE BARBER /STAFF
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson addressed more than 240 graduates of the Air Force Institute of Technology on Thursday evening at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. BARRIE BARBER /STAFF

Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson told newly minted “technical leaders” of the Air Force Institute of Technology to never stop asking why and to be innovators who build strong and trusted relationships to solve the nation’s national security challenges.

Wilson, an Air Force Academy alumnae and former Rhodes scholar at Oxford, spoke Thursday night to more than 240 AFIT graduates among an audience of 1,200 at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

RELATED: Threats will drive BRAC strategy, Air Force leader says

Among three key points of advice, the top Air Force civilian leader told graduates to be critical thinkers who challenge assumptions about why.

“You will also now serve as technical leaders and as leaders in technology and science you have to learn four important words. You have to learn to say, ‘that’s not good enough.’”

The secretary cited recent hypoxia-like incidents among pilots experiencing oxygen loss in some of the most sophisticated aircraft, such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and more basic training aircraft such as the propeller-driven T-6 Texan, as an example to keep asking why and not be pressured to cut short the search for answers.

She told graduates they should not be afraid to say no, even to superiors, until a solution is known.

Wilson told them they must also be innovators.

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Air Force leader says total dominance not a ‘birthright’

“Innovation doesn’t come from requirement statements,” she said. “There was never a requirement statement for a silicon chip. There was never a requirement statement for Uber. There was probably wasn’t a requirement statement for GPS.

“If you’re not making mistakes as an engineer, you’re probably only proving that what you already know really does work,” she said. “That’s not innovation. We need you to push the bounds of what you know.”

The high-flying, record-breaking Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird spy plane with a needle-like sleek shape demanded overcoming a series of technical problems, from aviators in space suits ejecting at extreme speeds and altitudes to heat-resistant glass that wouldn’t distort surveillance cameras view.

“The result was an air-breathing monster faster than a speeding bullet,” she said. “What would your innovation be?”

Developing trusted relationships is the third key, Wilson said.

“The work that you are about matters, and the people matter more,” she said.

EXCLUSIVE: Top Air Force general says ‘all programs are at risk’

From her time at the Air Force Academy to serving on the national security council staff, the former New Mexico congresswoman said she could count “on one hand” people she could call on at any time.

“Those kinds of relationships are built over a long period of time are priceless in your life,” she said.

The Air Force’s top leaders listen and trust each other and see things from different perspectives to address national security issues, she said.

“You have everything to gain as young officers and civilians in the Air Force to see alternative perspectives, to find your partners in crime who are going to push you and make you better because steel sharpens steel,” she told AFIT graduates.

“The United States Air Force relies on the most advanced technology to defend our nation and project power in the air and space around the globe,” Wilson added. “We’re going to lean on you. We’re going to lean hard on you as the next generation of scientists and engineers in air and space.

“So choose to ask why, choose to be an innovator, and choose to build strong relationships throughout your professional lives,” she said. “Our nation needs you desperately and future generations are counting on you.”

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