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New Lock 27 brewery next to Dayton Dragons field now open

Published: Friday, August 25, 2017 @ 12:10 PM
Updated: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 @ 9:58 AM

New downtown Dayton brewery & restaurant sets opening date

Play beer! The Lock 27 brewery and restaurant in downtown Dayton is ready to throw out the first pitch.

>> PHOTOS: First look at the amazing transformation of Lock 27’s new downtown brewery 

The highly anticipated debut of the brewery and restaurant’s second — and much larger — location has finally arrived, Tuesday, Sept. 5, according to Lock 27 founder Steve Barnhart. 

How close is Lock 27 Brewing to the Dayton Dragons’ Fifth Third Field? About this close. MARK FISHER/STAFF(Staff Writer)

>> RELATED: LICKETY-SPLIT: That’s how fast Delco Lofts apartments are filling up

The brewery and restaurant on East Monument Avenue occupies about 12,000 square feet of the Delco Building’s basement and first floor. It will open with about 50 employees, Barnhart has said. The original Lock 27 location on Ohio 48 in south Centerville remains open.

>> Dayton’s craft beer: A guide to breweries

The highly anticipated opening of Lock 27 brewery and restaurant adjacent to Fifth Third Field in downtown Dayton will come on Labor Day, Monday Sept. 4, Lock 27 founder Steve Barnhart said today, Aug. 25. The pub will host some “soft-open” activities during the week leading up to the official opening, Barnhart said. MARK FISHER/STAFF(Staff Writer)

Lock 27 will be the third restaurant/beer pub to open in the space of about two months within a stone’s throw of the Dayton Dragon’s baseball stadium, joining Canal Street Arcade and Deli and Mudlick Tap House. But Lock 27 is a working brewery in addition to offering food service, and it shares a main plaza with Fifth Third Field, overlooking the Dayton Dragons’ stadium.

>> Lock 27 to build 2nd brewery, pub in downtown Dayton

The Lock 27 brewpub will seat about 120, and will serve lunch and dinner seven days a week, Barnhart has said.

>> Centerville brewery doubles its capacity to meet demand

Barnhart is a native of Chicago who moved to the Dayton area in 1984. He spent 15 years working in corporate development at NCR. An avid home-brewer since 1997, Barnhart opened Lock 27 in Centerville in June 2013.

>> Sneak peek at Centerville’s new brewpub

>> ICYMI: New taco restaurant coming to The Greene

The highly anticipated opening of Lock 27 brewery and restaurant adjacent to Fifth Third Field in downtown Dayton will come on Labor Day, Monday Sept. 4, Lock 27 founder Steve Barnhart said today, Aug. 25. The pub will host some "soft-open" activities during the week leading up to the official opening, Barnhart said. MARK FISHER/STAFF(Mark Fisher)

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: What we know now

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 10:26 AM

Local businesses feeling pressure from government shutdown

U.S. lawmakers are in session today but no deal is in sight to prevent an extended government shutdown.

The Wright-Patterson Air Force Museum closed Saturday and other local governmental institutions will be closed Monday as Republicans and Democrats have failed to reach a deal to fund governmental operations.

Both sides are dug in at the moment, with Republicans pushing for a larger defense budget and the Democrats wanting more non-defense spending as well as an agreement on the immigration bill — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Cox Media Group D.C. Correspondent Jamie Dupree reports.

Students at the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine practice hazardous materials scenarios in the apprentice program. In this Dayton Daily News file photo, Airman 1st Class Jane Vierzen wore full hazmat suits with a respirator to complete her site reconnaissance health risk assessment training. TY GREENLEES/STAFF(Staff Writer)

RELATED >>> Wright-Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown still in place

U.S. Senate members return at 1 p.m. today and the U.S. House of Representatives meet at 2 p.m. but no action is expected this afternoon. The U.S. Senate has a procedural vote set for early Monday morning on the GOP’s plan to fund the government through Feb. 8.

5 WAYS SHUTDOWN IS AFFECTING GOVERNMENT

1.  U.S. troops will continue to report for duty and U.S. Mail will be delivered, but around one million civilian federal workers will not be at work if the shutdown extends into Monday, according to the Associated Press.

2. Nearly 45,500 IRS employees will be furloughed, which could delay the implementation of lower income tax withholdings set to go into effect nationwide next month, according to the AP.

3. Medicare and Medicaid will continue to operate, the former continuing to provide insurance coverage for nearly 59 million seniors and disabled citizens and the ladder continuing to provide coverage for low-income and disabled people, according to the AP.

4. Most of the federal employees under the U.S. Department of Justice will continue working during the shutdown, including members of the national security division, the FBI, DEA, ATF and the U.S. Marshals Service, according to the AP.

5. Some U.S. Lawmakers have announced they will donate their pay during the shutdown. U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) announced Saturday he will donate to an Ohio diaper bank that supports struggling families and Sen. Todd Young (R-IND) announced he will donate his pay to charity.

The Statue of Liberty is pictured from Liberty State Park on January 21, 2018 in Jersey City, New Jersey. The iconic landmark was closed yesterday as part of the US government shutdown now entering its second full day after coming into effect at midnight on Friday after senators failed to pass a new federal spending bill. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

RELATED: Air Force Museum closes; Wright-Patt workers face furlough

RELATED: Wright Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown still in place

RELATED: Government shutdown now official; Political parties blame each other

RELATED: Government shutdown: How will you be impacted

RELATED: How it affects key government offices

 

 

In other words, nothing has changed – for weeks.

2 rape trials scheduled to start in Greene County on Monday

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 7:02 AM

Two separate rape trials are set to begin Monday in Judge Stephen Wolaver’s courtroom in Greene County Common Pleas Court.

Myron Marquice Walker, 20, is charged with rape and gross sexual imposition and has been held in the Greene County Jail since his arrest in October.

A grand jury indicted Walker on the charges on Oct. 20, and Walker pleaded not guilty to the charges on Oct. 27.

STAY CONNECTED: Greene County News on Facebook

The alleged incident came to light the early evening of Jan. 22, when Greene County deputies responded to Greene Memorial Hospital on a possible sex offense, according to the sheriff’s office report. 

A 19-year-old woman reported she had been raped that afternoon at a home on Eavey Street in Xenia Twp., and she underwent a sexual assault examination at the hospital, according to the report. 

The sheriff’s office did not release further details, citing an ongoing investigation. 

Walker’s attorney Travis Kane said this is a case in which two college students engaged in consensual sex.

“My client has maintained his innocence from the very beginning. He’s been cooperative with law enforcement, and he’s eager to prove his innocence in court,” Kane said.

This is not the first trial for Walker on the same charges in a different case. On Jan. 12, 2017, a jury found him not guilty of rape and did not reach a verdict on a charge of gross sexual imposition. 

Myron Marquice Walker

The case stemmed from an incident that allegedly happened in November 2015 in a Hawthorn Hall dormitory at Wright State University, according to Greene County court records.

RELATED >>> Jury acquits ex-WSU student in rape case

Jury selection on Walker’s new case is scheduled to start first thing Monday morning, according to Wolaver’s office.

If Walker’s case is delayed, the jury trial of David P. Coleman, 34, who has been held at the Greene County Jail since his arrest in April 2017, is scheduled to begin with jury selection, according to Wolaver’s office.

David P. Coleman

On April 28, 2017, a grand jury indicted Coleman on charges of rape, felonious assault and abduction, according to Greene County court records. On May 5, 2017, Coleman pleaded not guilty to the charges, according to the court records.

SEE WHO’S IN JAIL: Greene County Jail inmates

Coleman’s attorney, William Cass, could not be reached for comment.

Coleman’s trial will have to be rescheduled, if Walker’s case gets started as planned, according to Wolaver’s office.

Arizona mother who gave toddler fatal meth dose receives 20-year prison sentence

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 2:44 PM

Mother Gave Toddler Fatal Meth Dose, Receives 20-Year Prison Sentence

An Arizona woman who gave her toddler a fatal dose of methamphetamine in 2016 was sentenced Friday to 20 years in prison.

>> Read more trending news 

Natalie Russell, 30, pleaded guilty last month to second-degree murder and child abuse, azcentral.com reported. Russell claimed she gave her 22-month-old daughter meth to counteract the effects of methadone. The child had accidentally ingested methadone that was left in an open container, Russell allegedly told police. Officials said Russell failed to get her daughter medical assistance.

Several friends and family members attended Russell's sentencing at the Maricopa County Superior Court, azcenteral.com reported. Russell's supporters said they forgave her for her actions. Russell maintains that she never meant to harm her daughter, and her actions were driven by her drug addiction.

Related

Girl, 9, unknowingly hands out THC-laced candy to classmates, school says

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 8:35 PM

9-Year-Old Girl Unknowingly Gave THC-Laced Candy to Classmates, School Says

A 9-year-old girl unwittingly ate, and handed out to other classmates, THC-laced candy, school officials said. 

>> Read more trending news

The girl brought the candies to school last Thursday and said she could not see; another girl ate them and started to feel dizzy, Albuquerque School of Excellence Dean of Elementary School Students Kristy Del Curto told KRQE

“We noticed the student who initially brought the edible to our school was acting strange. She started saying she couldn’t see,” Del Curto said.

Three students shared one gummy and the student who handed it out had three or four pieces, Del Curto said. 

Paramedics were called and monitored the students, who eventually recovered. 

The student who brought them to school did not know they were medicinal, THC-laced gummies, Del Curto said.

“As marijuana becomes legal in each state, it’s going to become more and more of an issue, I believe,” Del Curto said.