19-year-old wins $500,000 in lottery, gives it to his parents

Published: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 6:20 PM

One teen struck gold while playing the lottery in Lansing, Michigan, but instead of using the money to buy lavish gifts for himself, he decided to give most of the winnings to his parents.

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The Lansing State Journal reported that the 19-year-old won $500,000 playing Michigan’s Golden Wild Time scratch-off game after buying the ticket at a Sunoco gas station. He immediately decided to help out his parents by giving them the money, according to Michigan State Lottery officials.

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The Michigan state lottery website said the winner wanted to remain anonymous. 

“I’m going to keep about $5,000 for myself to invest, and I’m going to give the rest to my parents,” said the teen. “My parents have done so much for my sister and me, helping them takes a big weight off of their shoulders and mine.”

He said he’s glad he can help alleviate some of his parents’ financial burdens.

“It’s just incredible,” he said. “I can’t get the smile off my face.”

Florida woman tells trooper: ‘I want to kiss you’

Published: Monday, April 24, 2017 @ 12:21 AM

Saryna Parker.
Miami-Dade County Jail

A former Florida middle school teacher who faces several charges after police say she drove drunk and caused a crash put on quite a performance for a state trooper.

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Saryna Parker, 43, is shown telling the trooper, “I want to kiss you,” in Florida Highway Patrol dashcam video obtained by WTVJ. “If you don’t stop looking at me like that, I’m going to kiss you.”

Parker, who troopers said was driving with her 10-year-old son in the car in the March 19 accident, at first said she wasn’t the driver and tried to leave to use a bathroom, according to the Miami Herald

As Parker goes through sobriety tests in the video, her speech seems slurred. Parker was arrested and after troopers put her in the patrol car, she kicked one of them in the groin, according to the arrest report.

Parker also can be heard complaining about the students she taught, WTVJ reported.

Miami-Dade Schools officials said Parker was on probation, has been fired and will never be allowed to apply to their schools, according to WTVJ.

Parker was released on bond the next day, WSVN reported. She faces charges of DUI, DUI with property damage, careless driving and battery on a police officer, which is a felony.

1876 documents that launched MLB headed for auction

Published: Monday, April 24, 2017 @ 12:03 AM

The original constitution setting out the rules for the National League in 1876 will go on the block next month.
SCP Auctions

It could be called the Ten Commandments of Major League Baseball, even though it’s 74 pages long. Or perhaps, since it has just been discovered, it could be baseball’s version of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

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Regardless, the 1876 “Founding Documents and Original Constitution of Major League Baseball” are a valuable piece of sports memorabilia. The documents will go on sale May 24 in online bidding sponsored by SCP AuctionsSports Collectors Daily reported.

The artifact is a handwritten document that officials from California-based SCP Auctions claim is of “unprecedented historical significance.” The contents became part of baseball’s early bylaws, but the location of the original documents had been a mystery. They had been in the possession of the family of a longtime National League executive and had been passed down through the generations, Sports Collectors Daily reported.

“This is a huge revelation,” SCP Auctions Vice President Dan Imler told USA Today. “This is not a document that has made the rounds publicly. It’s never been exhibited in a major institution. It’s never been sold previously in a prior auction. It has never appeared anywhere.”

Baseball became a professional sport in 1869 thanks to the barnstorming tour of the Cincinnati Red Stockings, and in 1871 the National Association was formed. But after the 1875 season, baseball owners realized that more rules and structure were needed to make baseball more successful and profitable. In a meeting held on Feb. 2, 1876, in New York, Chicago White Stockings owner William Hulbert proposed a blueprint for operating professional baseball.

The other owners hammered out a plan and a new association was formed, dubbed “The National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs.” The league’s inaugural franchises would be located in Chicago, Boston, Cincinnati, New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Hartford and Louisville.

Copies of the plan were given to each club but the one coming to SCP Auctions is the first original known to have survived, Sports Collectors Daily reported.

“Very few documents of this importance exist in tangible form,” Imler told USA Today.

“It's really remarkable to think that a document of such historical importance has never been unearthed until now," SCP Auctions spokesman Terry Melia said Sunday. "We're just excited to see what kind of reaction the original MLB constitution gets from the collecting community when our online bidding starts May 24.

“We expect it will be very strong." 

Authenticating the constitution took several months, as experts confirmed the age of the ink and the paper. The handwriting was analyzed and baseball historian John Thorn added his expertise as a consultant, USA Today reported. 

The baseball constitution continues a trend of originating documents that have come to auction. In 2016, SCP Auctions sold a set of 1857 documents representing the original rules of baseball for $3.26 million on auction, Sports Collectors Daily reported. James Naismith’s original 13-page “Rules of Basket Ball” sold for $4.34 million in 2010 by Sotheby’s to a consortium put together by Josh Swade, who chronicled his quest in his 2013 book, “The Holy Grail of Hoops One Fan’s Quest to Buy the Original Rules of Basketball,” and in an ESPN documentary.

The SCP auction for the baseball constitution documents will close on June 10.

Doritos sends dates to prom in helicopters

Published: Sunday, April 23, 2017 @ 11:30 PM

Doritos bags. (Photo: j_lai/flickr/Creative Commons) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

Four teens got the chauffeured experience of a lifetime when they were taken to their prom by helicopter.

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Shaedon Wedel asked his friend Carson Wittmann’s sister, Carli, who has Down syndrome, to prom. He wore a custom Doritos T-shirt and tweets of the video plea to his prospective prom date caught the attention of the chip maker last month.

So Doritos sent two red helicopters to pick up Wedel and Carli as well as Carson and his date Saturday. A Wisconsin couple sent Carli a fancy evening gown so she could complete her dream of being Cinderella.

“This is absolutely amazing, this is so cool,” Wedel told the Kansas City Star. “Such a cool experience. Especially to do it with her though: to be able to have her this happy, it’s all I wanted.”

Doritos also gave Carli a year supply of chips.

Protests, pride on display for Confederate Memorial Day

Published: Sunday, April 23, 2017 @ 9:33 PM

Confederate flags fly over the graves of Confederate soldiers buried in Magnolia Cemetery on July 14, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
John Moore/Getty Images

State offices will be closed Monday in Alabama and Mississippi -- the only two states that honor Confederate Memorial Day.

The day observes those who died fighting for the South during the Civil War after those states seceded from the U.S.

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Opponents are against it because they say it honors those who fought to maintain slavery. Supporters say the holiday recognizes the history and legacy of those who fought in the Civil War.

“I’m troubled that in a state made up of 40 percent people of color, our leadership continues to openly sanction the use of taxpayer funds to endorse a neo-Confederate agenda,” Lea Campbell, president of the Mississippi Rising Coalition, said in a release.

The group has a protest planned for Monday at the Harrison County Justice Court in Gulfport.

The Mississippi Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans says it is a historical group working to preserve history and the day honors the legacy of those who fought.

Alabama and Mississippi are not the only states that celebrate their Confederate past. 

Georgia removed the “Confederate” designation from its holiday in 2015 but state employees still have the day off. Now the last Monday in April is called “State Holiday.”

In South Carolina, Confederate Memorial Day is celebrated in May to mark when Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson died.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.