Winter weather: How to shovel, remove snow safely

Published: Saturday, December 09, 2017 @ 10:00 AM

How To Safely Remove Snow

As snow falls, homeowners need to keep up on snow removal.

But simple snow shoveling could land some in the emergency room if they don’t follow some simple guidelines.

“Picking up a shovel and moving hundreds of pounds of snow, particularly after doing nothing physical for several months, can put a big strain on the heart,” Harvard Health executive editor Patrick Skerrett has written in the past.

Cold temperatures can also increase heart rate and blood pressure. Blood can clot easier and constrict arteries, decreasing blood supply, the National Safety Council reported

From 1990-2006, 1,647 people died from heart issues related to shoveling snow, the BBC reported. The average is about 100 people a year die from shoveling-related heart attacks.

FILE PHOTO: A man shovels snow in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)(Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

So how can you keep yourself safe while doing the winter chore?

The National Safety Council said:

  • Don’t shovel after eating.
  • Don’t smoke and shovel.
  • Shovel fresh, powdery snow.
  • Push the snow instead of lifting it.
  • If you must lift, use a small shovel or partially fill the shovel.
  • Lift with your legs, not your back.
  • Don’t work until you’re exhausted.

If you have history of heart disease, ask a doctor before attempting to shovel and if you feel tightness in the chest or dizziness while shoveling, stop.

If you opt for a snowblower instead of a shovel, the American Society for Surgery of the Hand and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons offer these snowblower safety tips:

  • If it jams, turn it off.
  • Keep hands away from moving parts.
  • Don’t drink alcohol.
  • Be aware of carbon monoxide risk in an enclosed space.
  • Refuel only when the blower is off, not while it’s running

Shutdown nixes Trump visit to Mar-a-Lago; party goes on with son Eric headlining

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 10:49 PM

Despite President Donald Trump deciding not to travel to Palm Beach on Saturday, January 20, 2018 due to the government shutdown, supporters and protesters stood near Mar-a-Lago. (Photo: Palm Beach Post)
Despite President Donald Trump deciding not to travel to Palm Beach on Saturday, January 20, 2018 due to the government shutdown, supporters and protesters stood near Mar-a-Lago. (Photo: Palm Beach Post)

The federal government shutdown led President Donald Trump to cancel plans to celebrate the anniversary of his first year in office at a $100,000-per-couple fundraiser at Mar-a-Lago on Saturday.

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As of Saturday evening, the fundraiser was still set to go on with presidential son Eric Trump and his wife, Lara Trump, and Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel as headliners. About 100 donors were expected Saturday night, with their contributions going to the RNC and Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign.

Eric and Lara Trump and McDaniel also spoke to about 100 local Republican activists in West Palm Beach on Saturday morning, urging them to work to preserve the GOP’s imperiled majorities in the House and Senate.

“We’re very, very lucky that we have majorities in the House and Senate. I mean, we’re very, very, very lucky. But let’s not take that for granted as a party because honestly, 2018 will be as important as ever,” Eric Trump told the Republican group at the West Palm Beach Marriott. “His great work is hugely, hugely impeded if we lose that and I’m going to fight every single day between now and those elections to make sure that those majorities are stronger than ever.”

President Trump had planned to visit Mar-a-Lago on Friday for the 12th time since taking office. But he remained in Washington as congressional Republicans and Democrats failed to reach a spending agreement to keep the government running past midnight.

After Friday’s cancellation, the White House left open the possibility of a Trump trip to Palm Beach on Saturday. The Federal Aviation Administration issued an advisory for an arrival after 2 p.m. Saturday, but rescinded it by mid-afternoon. The latest FAA notification indicated no presidential travel planned to Palm Beach County this weekend.

“No plans to go to Florida while there is a shutdown,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in an email Saturday morning.

Brian Ballard, the Tallahassee lobbyist who was Florida finance chairman for Trump’s 2016 campaign, came to Palm Beach for Saturday’s event and said he understood the president’s choice to remain in Washington.

“I think it was the right decision. I haven’t talked to anyone that’s down here for the event that doesn’t agree,” Ballard said. “We’ll celebrate the one-year anniversary sometime soon.”

Trump supporters, who regularly gather near Southern Boulevard and Flagler Drive to cheer the president’s motorcade as it passes, showed up in Trump’s absence, numbering about 25 at 1 p.m. Saturday.

“It’s the one-year anniversary of President Trump and the mainstream media is ignoring all of his accomplishments. All they want to talk about is the government shutdown over DACA and illegal immigration,” said Lamarre Notargiacomo of Vero Beach, who held an “Eliminate Sanctuary Cities” sign.

Most Senate Democrats voted against a spending bill to keep the government running for four weeks because the legislation did not address the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shields from deportation about 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the United States as minors by their parents.

Another group of Trump supporters gathered a few blocks away near the garishly decorated “Trumpmobile” and other vehicles adorned with pro-Trump messages. That group left for Palm Beach to drive by an anti-Trump demonstration that police said drew 600 to 700 protesters.

Staff writer Chelsea Todaro contributed to this story.

John Coleman, The Weather Channel founder, dead at 83

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 5:39 PM

CORRECTS THAT COLEMAN IS AT RIGHT, NOT LEFT - In this July 30, 1981 photo,  John Coleman, weather channel founder, right, and Frank Batten, publisher of the Norfolk, Va., Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star, and chairman and chief executive of Landmark Communications, Inc., are seen during a news conference in New York. John Coleman, the founder of The Weather Channel and longtime KUSI weatherman, died Saturdaty night, Jan. 20, 2018, at home in Las Vegas, said his wife Linda Coleman. He was 83.  (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File)
Marty Lederhandler/AP
CORRECTS THAT COLEMAN IS AT RIGHT, NOT LEFT - In this July 30, 1981 photo, John Coleman, weather channel founder, right, and Frank Batten, publisher of the Norfolk, Va., Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star, and chairman and chief executive of Landmark Communications, Inc., are seen during a news conference in New York. John Coleman, the founder of The Weather Channel and longtime KUSI weatherman, died Saturdaty night, Jan. 20, 2018, at home in Las Vegas, said his wife Linda Coleman. He was 83. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File)(Marty Lederhandler/AP)

John Coleman, who helped found and develop The Weather Channel, died Saturday at his home in Las Vegas. He was 83.

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Coleman, a longtime weatherman, innovated the position when he started at Good Morning America, according to the Washington Post. 

Coleman started The Weather Channel in 1981 with Joseph D’Aleo. Coleman left the network and continued forecasting on stations in New York and Chicago. He last worked in San Diego until he retired in 2014, according to the Washington Post

“Thirty five years ago John Coleman and others founded The Weather Channel to answer a demand for around-the-clock weather information,” the network said in a statement. “We will forever appreciate his vision that we continue to this day as the demand for severe weather coverage and hyper-local forecasting is at an all-time high.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Dogs save lost woman who had fallen in snow

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 10:29 AM

File photo.  (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Matt Cardy/Getty Images
File photo. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)(Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Adam and Eva were not acting normally. 

The labradoodles were pacing like they urgently needed to go out at 4:30  a.m.

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"(Adam) never tugged on my clothes before, so I was a cautious about letting them out because I didn't know if there was anything out there," Lonnie Chester told MLive.com.

In the snow and darkness, the dogs found a woman in her late 80s, wearing only a nightgown, who had fallen and was struggling in the frigid cold.

"She looked up at me and said, 'I'm so cold,'" Chester said. "I have no idea how long she had been out there. She must have been terrified."

When they found the woman on Jan. 13 it was 9 degrees that morning. They called 911, and personnel came to the scene and treated the woman. 

Family, who had been looking for the woman, came to the Chester’s house as rescue crews were there and asked if they had seen the woman.

"It could have been a tragic outcome had Adam and Eva not woken us," Susan Chester told MLive.com. "I don't know how they knew she was out there."

Police investigate man’s claim wife died during trip to Graceland

Published: Saturday, January 13, 2018 @ 11:09 PM

Man Claims Wife Died During Trip to Graceland, Police Trying to Find Her Body

Roberta Snider and her husband left their Ohio home to visit Graceland, but she never returned. 

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Her husband, Philip Snider, told police Roberta Snider, 69, died of natural causes in a hotel parking lot across the street from Elvis Presley’s estate the day they arrived, and then she was taken by an ambulance to a hospital.

However there is no record of her body in Tennessee, according to the Akron Beacon Journal.

“At first blush, what happened seemed reasonable,” Hartville Police Chief Larry Dordea told the Akron Beacon Journal

Now investigators are tasked with retracing their 725-mile route to find answers. 

“I think (Philip’s) recollection may be suspect,” Dordea said. “It’s a traumatic time for him, a lot of emotional pain. I’m not ready to clearly support any kind of thesis on this now. We have to painstakingly, methodically sift through the evidence.”

Philip Snider, 72, and Roberta Snider, known as Bobby, told their children they were going to the Memphis attraction one last time before she died. They left Jan. 4 and arrived two days later to the parking lot of a Days Inn hotel where Bobby had a medical emergency and died, Philip Snider said. 

He found an ambulance parked nearby and rescue workers told Philip they were taking his wife to a Memphis hospital. 

Philip did not know the name of the ambulance company or the hospital. He stayed the night then returned to Ohio. 

Authorities have searched their condo and investigators are tracking down surveillance video that could have captured footage of the couple during their drive, according to the Canton Repository.

“Whether this is a crime or not, we want to find Mrs. Snider and get her back to family so she can be laid to rest in proper manner,” Dordea said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.