UPDATE


Whose inauguration crowd was bigger, Trump or Obama?

Published: Friday, January 20, 2017 @ 12:25 PM
Updated: Friday, January 20, 2017 @ 5:46 PM


            Highlights From President Donald Trump’s Inauguration Speech
Highlights From President Donald Trump’s Inauguration Speech

Photos circulating online claim to compare the crowd size at former president Barack Obama's 2009 inauguration and Donald Trump's inauguration Friday. 

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Side by side photos show a significant difference in the amount of people that attended the events each year. The comparison shows a packed space at the National Mall for the 2009 inauguration and a sparse crowd for this year's inauguration.

Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Posted by HOT 105 on Friday, January 20, 2017

According to the Associated Press, both photos were taken shortly before noon from the top of the Washington Monument.

An estimated 1.8 million people attended President Barack Obama's first inauguration.

Estimates ahead of Friday's inauguration, expected anywhere from 700,000 to 900,000 people -- about half the amount that turned out for Obama's first inauguration -- to attend the inauguration of the 45th president. 

But final counts of attendees still aren't in. Official photos from Getty and the Associated Press of the inauguration of Donald Trump Friday afternoon showed a crowded National Mall during at the time he was officially sworn in.

According to Washington's Metro system, 193,000 trips were taken as of 11 a.m. on Inauguration Day this year. The transit system said there were 513,000 trips taken on the day in 2009.


The swearing-in ceremony began around 11 a.m. 

This year and in 2009, thousands of people were delayed from entering the National Mall. This year, Trump supporters were slowed down by protesters. In 2009, Obama supporters were delayed due to "logistical hold-ups at security checkpoints," the AP reported. 

Charles Seife, a mathematician and professor of journalism at New York University, said estimating crowds is difficult.

"The best way is by aerial photography ... Take pictures and count heads, but even that is fraught," Seife said, according to Vox. "Pictures are taken at particular times, and (crowd) density may change over time. You're not going to see everybody. People will be popping in and out of buildings. There are people under trees. You can get a pretty sizable estimate, but it's not perfectly accurate."

And even then, he said, estimates can be skewed.

"Almost everyone who has tried to make a crowd estimate has a vested interest in what the outcome of the estimate is," Seife said in a in 2011 interview. "Whenever you see a crowd estimate, you have to wonder where it's coming from." 

For now, it's unclear just how many people attended the historic event this year.

Inspiration for 'Rosie the Riveter,' Naomi Parker Fraley, dies

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 1:31 PM

File - In this Oct. 31, 2007 file photo, a poster showing signatures of former Rosie the Riveter's is seen at the offices of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historic Park in Richmond, Calif. A woman identified by a scholar as the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, the iconic female World War II factory worker, has died in Washington state. The New York Times reports that Naomi Parker Fraley died Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Longview. She was 96. Multiple women have been identified over the years as possible models for Rosie, but a Seton Hall University professor in 2016 focused on Fraley as the true inspiration. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Eric Risberg/AP
File - In this Oct. 31, 2007 file photo, a poster showing signatures of former Rosie the Riveter's is seen at the offices of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historic Park in Richmond, Calif. A woman identified by a scholar as the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, the iconic female World War II factory worker, has died in Washington state. The New York Times reports that Naomi Parker Fraley died Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Longview. She was 96. Multiple women have been identified over the years as possible models for Rosie, but a Seton Hall University professor in 2016 focused on Fraley as the true inspiration. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)(Eric Risberg/AP)

The woman who many believe empowered housewives to leave their kitchens and enter the workplace left empty when men went to fight in World War II has died.

Naomi Parker Fraley was discovered in 2015 to have been the inspiration for the “Rosie the Riveter” poster tha decades earlier had become the symbol in which women realized “We Can Do It.”

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Fraley was a factory worker at Alameda Naval Station when a photographer asked to take her photo. With her hair in a bandana, just like the poster, Fraley is believed to be the starting point for the artist’s representation of women taking over what had been a men’s world, CNN reported.

Fraley was only 20 years old and was working with her 18-year-old sister at the time of the war, KATU reported.

She realized it was her photo that helped started the movement during a convention of women WWII factory workers. Her photo was labeled as the poster’s inspiration. Originally the photo was identified as that of Geraldine Hoff Doyle, but years of research confirmed in 2015 it was Fraley in the photo instead, CNN reported.

The man who made the identification, Dr. James Kimble, said of Fraley, “She didn't’ think she did anything special. A lot of women did what she did. She just wanted her picture corrected,” CNN reported.

Fraley died in Longview, Washington, Saturday, the BBC reported. She was 96.

Clotilda: Last-known slave ship uncovered after East Coast ‘Bomb Cyclone’

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 1:23 PM

Years of research and a particularly strong winter storm has led a reporter in Alabama to what is likely the remains of the last ship to carry slave cargo from Africa to the United States./Freeimages.com
Freeimages.com
Years of research and a particularly strong winter storm has led a reporter in Alabama to what is likely the remains of the last ship to carry slave cargo from Africa to the United States./Freeimages.com(Freeimages.com)

Years of research and a particularly strong winter storm has led a reporter in Alabama to what is likely the remains of the last ship to carry slave cargo from Africa to the United States.

Writer Ben Raines of al.com reported Tuesday that what is left of the slave ship Clotilda, “lies partially buried in mud alongside an island in the lower Mobile-Tensaw Delta, a few miles north of the city of Mobile. The hull is tipped to the port side, which appears almost completely buried in mud. The entire length of the starboard side, however, is almost fully exposed.”

The ship’s remains were discovered by Raines when the “Bomb Cyclone” winter system hit the eastern half of the country earlier this month. A confluence of strong systems created the storm that caused the tide in Mobile Bay to be especially low, Raines pointed out. The lower than normal tide better exposed what was left of the ship.

In the story, Raines says he documented the wreck with historical documents and photos – the remains rest in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, accessible only by boat – and took his findings to a team of archaeologists from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, Fla.

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The archaeologists agreed that Raines had probably found what was left of the Clotilda.

In the summer of 1860, the Clotilda brought 110 men, women and children from Africa to Alabama in violation of U.S. laws that banned international slave trade. The ship’s trans-Atlantic journey was the last recorded trip bringing human cargo from an African nation to the United States.

The expedition was financed by Timothy Meaher, a wealthy Mobile businessman who made a bet that he could sneak slaves into the country past forts on either side of the entrance to Mobile Bay, “under the officers’ noses.” 

Meaher was able to hire a ship and captain to bring the slaves to Mobile, but fearing that he would be caught and punished for the stunt, Meaher arranged for the ship to be burned after he had the slaves unloaded.

Those 110 slaves who were brought over on the Clotilda were freed five years later at the end of the Civil War. They asked Meaher to pay for their return to Africa. He refused, and the group went on to petition the U.S. government for the money. When the government refused, the group took up residence near Mobile, creating the community of Africatown.

The town, according to historian Sylvianne Diouf in her book “Dreams of Africa in Alabama,” was run under traditional African law and used African farming and education methods. The last survivor of the Clotilda trip, Cudjoe Kazoola Lewis , died in 1935, though descendants of the slaves brought over on the ship still live in the area.

The story of the Clotilda was recently resurrected in an episode of the PBS series “Finding Your Roots,” hosted by historian Henry Gates. In a December episode, Roots front man and drummer Questlove – whose given name is Ahmir Thompson – finds out that his great, great, great grandfather, Charles Lewis, was one of the slaves brought to America on the Clotilda’s trip.

Gates tells Questlove that Meaher chose the more than 100 slaves from a group of 4,000 to be brought to Alabama. Lewis was one of those chosen.

"Think about the odds, man," Gates said.

Click here to read Raines’ full story on finding the Clotilda. 

What Is A Bomb Cyclone?
 

6-year-old North Carolina girl dies three days after flu diagnosis

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 12:32 PM

Ohio has reported the third flu-related infant death this season.

A 6-year-old North Carolina girl is the latest person in the state to die from the flu.

Normally, information about her would not be released because of privacy laws, but her parents want people to know her story.

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Emily Muth was diagnosed with the flu last Tuesday. Her parents, Nathan Muth and Rhonda Muth, took her to an urgent care center in Cary, North Carolina, where a doctor prescribed Emily Tamiflu and sent her home.

Emily’s health briefly improved, then drastically worsened. She died Friday.

Emily Muth, 6, is one of the latest people in the county to die from the flu.

Emily had not gotten a flu shot. Her parents want to warn others to get the shot if they have not already.

“Cherish every single moment you have with your kids because it can be taken away in an instant,” Nathan Muth told WSOC. “This happened from Tuesday to Friday, so 3 ½ days. The flu is nothing to mess with.”

The Muths plan for their two sons to get their flu shots.

So far this season, 43 people have died from the flu in North Carolina. In South Carolina, that number is at 24, including nine last week.

At least 30 children have died this year from the flu nationwide.

5 missing after natural gas well catches fire in Oklahoma

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:24 AM
Updated: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:24 AM

VIDEO: 5 Missing After Oklahoma Natural Gas Well Catches Fire

Five workers remained missing Tuesday after a natural gas well exploded and caught fire in Oklahoma one day earlier, sending out a smoke plume that could be seen for miles.

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Officials said 16 other employees were able to get out of the area safely. One person was flown to a Tulsa hospital for treatment of unspecified injuries.

Emergency officials let the fire burn itself out and fought any flames that went beyond a perimeter they established. 

Pittsburg County officials said they moved the mission from rescue to recovery on Tuesday. When the scene cools, the medical examiner will check the scene.

The missing individuals were identified Friday, including:

  • Josh Ray, of Fort Worth, Texas
  • Matt Smith, of McAlester, Oklahoma
  • Cody Risk, of Wellington, Colorado
  • Parker Waldridge, of Crescent, Oklahoma
  • Roger Cunningham, of Seminole, Oklahoma

Ray, Smith and Risk worked for oil drilling company Patterson-UTI Energy Inc., which owns the well.

The company’s CEO, Andy Hendricks, said at a news conference that Patterson-UTI is supporting the families of the missing employees and working with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration as the agency investigates.

Workers will retain their jobs despite the loss of their job site, according to Patterson-UTI officials.

Authorities said the public was safe from contaminates and that there was no need for evacuations. 

Pittsburg County emergency managers and the county sheriff confirmed around 9 a.m. local time that an explosion and fire took place at a well in Quinton.

The well is owned by oil drilling company Patterson-UTI Energy Inc., employees confirmed. In a statement, company officials said they were unaware of what caused the fire.

“We have received reports that some of our employees and others are unaccounted for at this time,” the statement said. “Our top priority is the safety of our employees and any others who may be affected. We've activated our emergency response systems and are fully cooperating with first responders and authorities on the scene. We will provide more details as they are known.”

The company's president and CEO, Andy Hendricks, later released a separate statement:

All of us at Patterson-UTI are deeply saddened by the news of the incident in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, this morning. Our hearts go out to the families of the five missing individuals, three of whom are Patterson-UTI employees. We've reached out to their families and are providing support during this difficult time.

At this moment, no one knows with certainty what happened, and it would be unwise to speculate. Well control experts and emergency responders are on site and we will conduct a thorough investigation when the incident is fully contained. We will provide updates as more facts are known.

There is nothing more important to us than the safety of our employees and others we partner with in the field. Tonight, our thoughts and prayers go out to all those affected and their loved ones.

Red Mountain Energy was operating the well.

FOX23 storm chasers in the area spotted the smoke plume from the fire miles away.

Grief counselors and religious leaders were offering support to families and workers on Monday. The American Red Cross was also working to help first responders as they worked to contain the fire.

Fire crews also searched woods for anyone that may have run from the scene, but they didn’t find anyone. Searches are expected to resume once the area cools down.

The drilling company has reportedly notified the families of the five missing people.