Volcano under Yellowstone is way bigger than we thought

Published: Sunday, April 26, 2015 @ 8:23 AM
Updated: Sunday, April 26, 2015 @ 8:23 AM

Trending on Facebook

More popular and trending stories

Remember Yellowstone? It's the one with the bison, the geysers, the scenery and, oh yeah, the giant supervolcano. 

That last part isn't as well-known, but it's there: an enormous magma chamber stationed directly under the nation's oldest national park.

And here's the news: Scientists at the University of Utah have discovered another reservoir below the old one, and it's much, much bigger.

The new blob of magma measures about 30 miles long, 44 miles wide and at least 12 miles deep. Put together, it's enough magma to fill the Grand Canyon 11 times over. (Video via The World From Aboveand The Smithsonian

And for now, it's just sitting there, helping the upper chamber heat up the water that gives Yellowstone its hot springs and famous geysers like Old Faithful. (Video via National Parks Service)

The chamber also pushes on the ground above it, causing the ground of Yellowstone to rise or fall up to 3 inches a year — between 2004 and 2011, Yellowstone was pushed almost a foot higher. 

But the volcano is capable of much more — its last full eruption was 640,000 years ago, in an event that covered most of the American West and Midwest in feet of toxic volcanic ash. (Video via CBS)

The supervolcano's epic scale and potential for destruction has made it a popular subject of conspiracy theorists and "what if" movies — something that this newest discovery is unlikely to change. (Video viaNaked Science)

But the scientists stress the actual hazard is still the same and the upper chamber we already knew about would be responsible for an eruption. Researchers put the chance of a large eruption in any given year at just 1 in 700,000. 

This video includes an image from National Park Service / Ed Austin / Herb Jones.

Senate sends bill to Trump that toughens sanctions on Russia, Iran, North Korea

Published: Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 7:13 PM

In an overwhelming vote of 98-2, the U.S. Senate on Thursday sent President Donald Trump a bipartisan bill that places new economic sanctions on Russia, Iran and North Korea, as members of both parties joined to send a message not only to those three regimes, but also the the White House, on the subject of U.S.-Russian relations and the 2016 campaign.

“We will not tolerate attacks on our democracy. That’s what this bill is all about,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) declared on the Senate floor, as Senators in both parties directly linked Russian interference in last year’s elections to this legislative effort.

“This bill will prevent President Trump from relaxing sanctions on Russia without Congressional review,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH). “We’re all concerned about that.”

“Today’s legislation will help us more forcefully defend our interests and hold these destabilizing regimes accountable,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA).

“This measure makes clear that Iran, North Korea and Russia will always be held accountable for their malicious actions,” said Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK).

But because of the provisions that limit the President’s authority on sanctions against Russia, the White House has been reluctant to endorse the effort, as hours before the vote, officials were still refusing to say whether President Trump would veto this bill.

“We continue to support strong sanctions against those three countries. And we are going to wait and see what that final of legislation and make a decision at that point,” said spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

But the Senate vote of 98-2, and the House vote of 419-3, showed a Congress that was almost united in support of the plan, suggesting there would be more than enough votes to override a veto by Mr. Trump.

“President Trump should sign this bill as soon as it hits his desk,” said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA). “Otherwise, he risks encouraging Russia’s interference in future elections.”

From the outset, Mr. Trump has advocated a less confrontational approach with Russia, one that has been repeatedly rejected by members of both parties – and this bill was one more piece of evidence on that front.

“This bipartisan bill is about keeping America safe, and I urge the president to sign it into law,” said Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA), the Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Doctors want to set the record straight on ‘dry drowning'

Published: Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 7:10 PM

Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning Explained

You’ve probably seen articles about “dry drowning” in your Facebook feeds, but the local medical community wants to set the record straight.

>> Read more trending news

You can find hundreds of articles online about “dry drowning,” especially after an incident last month where doctors say a 4-year-old in Texas died.

WSB-TV met Dr. Andrea Keyes, an emergency physician with Northside Hospital Cherokee, who said there’s a misconception about "dry drowning."

“The appropriate term is drowning,” Keyes said.

Keyes told Lucie concerns about children showing no symptoms at first and dying days after swimming have little to do with drowning.

“More commonly, it is going to be something more common -- a viral illness, or some sort of bronchitis, something along those lines,” she explained. 

According to doctors, “dry drowning” is not even an accepted medical term. 

Doctors say always remember the important things when you’re at the pool:

  • Never take your eye off your child.
  • For the young ones, always stay close to them and if your child does have some sort of episode after going under, parents will know if they need to go to the ER. 

“If they’re having significant difficulty with breathing, confusion, color changes or obvious signs of distress,” Keyes said. 

But the thousands of stories on Facebook and Google about “dry drowning” have spread misinformation and confusion in the community. 

“Have you ever heard of dry drowning? I have. Do you know what it is? It is when a child has gone swimming and gets too much water in the lungs,” insists Kenia Bernard, a mother Lucie spoke with at the Garden Hills. 

Like many parents, the “dry drowning” articles have made her concerned, but Keyes says the symptoms she’s described are just known as drowning. 

“When water enters the airway, there is difficulty with breathing, the airway then swells, and this causes a lack of oxygen to the rest of the body, which then can cause increased fluid in the lungs and around the heart, cause seizures, and then cause death,” she explained. 

WSB-TV asked Keyes to clarify a secondary cause. 

“More commonly, it is going to be something more common -- a viral illness, or some sort of bronchitis, something along those lines,” she said. 

File photo of a swimming pool.
The bottom line is always keep an eye on your kids around bodies of water and make sure they’re wearing appropriate lifesaving devices.

Fire Ball rides closed in California after deadly Ohio State Fair accident

Published: Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 10:42 AM

Authorities stand near the Fire Ball amusement ride after the ride malfunctioned injuring several at the Ohio State Fair, Wednesday, July 26, 2017, in Columbus, Ohio. Some of the victims were thrown from the ride when it malfunctioned Wednesday night, said Columbus Fire Battalion Chief Steve Martin. (Jim Woods/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
Jim Woods/AP
Authorities stand near the Fire Ball amusement ride after the ride malfunctioned injuring several at the Ohio State Fair, Wednesday, July 26, 2017, in Columbus, Ohio. Some of the victims were thrown from the ride when it malfunctioned Wednesday night, said Columbus Fire Battalion Chief Steve Martin. (Jim Woods/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)(Jim Woods/AP)

Officials in California shut down Fire Ball rides at a trio of state fairs and attractions after a similar ride in Ohio malfunctioned Wednesday, killing one man and injuring several others.

>> Read more trending news

The swinging, spinning Fire Ball amusement park ride malfunctioned at the Ohio State Fair in Columbus on Wednesday, the opening day of the fair. Dramatic video captured by a bystander shows the ride swinging back and forth like a pendulum and spinning in the air when it crashes into something and part of the ride flies off, throwing riders to the ground.

The cause of the malfunction is under investigation.

The accident prompted officials to close similar rides at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, the California State Fair in Sacramento and the Orange County Fair in Costa Mesa, KSBW reported.

A spokesperson for the popular Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk told KRON that its Fire Ball ride was closed Wednesday in light of the accident. It was expected to reopen Thursday, after officials are able to thoroughly inspect the ride, KSBW reported.

“We inspect the rides daily,” Boardwalk community affairs director Kris Reyes told KSBW. “The Fire Ball was inspected Wednesday morning and passed.”

Barry Schailble, an inspector with the company hired by the California State Fair, told KCRA that officials “shut down the ride immediately, unloaded it and it’s closed right now.”

On its website, Amusements of America said that since its debut in 2002, the Fire Ball, which was manufactured by KMG, had become "one of the most popular thrill rides on the AOA Midway." The company's description of the ride said it swings riders 40 feet above the midway, while spinning them at 13 revolutions per minute.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Ohio State Fair Ride Accident Kills One, Injures Six

Beheading of 88-year-old man, killing of wife remain unsolved, haunts Georgia sheriff  

Published: Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 6:35 PM

The home where Russell and Shirley Dermond lived in the Great Waters subdivision in Eatonton, Ga., on Lake Oconee about 80 miles southeast of Atlanta. Russell Dermond was found beheaded in the garage in May of 2014. His head has never been found. Shirley Dermond’s body was found in the lake  10 days later. The case remains unsolved.
Christian Boone/Atlanta Journal-Constitution
The home where Russell and Shirley Dermond lived in the Great Waters subdivision in Eatonton, Ga., on Lake Oconee about 80 miles southeast of Atlanta. Russell Dermond was found beheaded in the garage in May of 2014. His head has never been found. Shirley Dermond’s body was found in the lake  10 days later. The case remains unsolved.(Christian Boone/Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Even the internet is baffled.

On Reddit, where there are typically 10 conspiracy theories floated for every fact, only questions surface in a discussion group devoted to the grisly murders of Russell and Shirley Dermond, the elderly Eatonton couple found dead more than three years ago.

>> Read more trending news

For every theory, there’s a contradiction that debunks it. The lead investigator in the case, longtime Putnam County Sheriff Howard Sills, admits the trail for the killers — he’s confident at least two people were involved — has run cold.

“We’ve eliminated many, many, many things,” said Sills, a gruff, plain-talking lawman entering his third decade as Putnam sheriff. “But as far as a suspect, we’re probably as far away as we were 3 1/2 years ago.”

Recently, Sills agreed to open up the case file to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, sharing autopsy photos, pieces of evidence and his personal reflections on why this has been “the absolute most confounding thing I’ve ever dealt with in my entire career.”

‘They had no enemies’

The call came in on Tuesday, May 6, 2014, from inside Reynolds Plantation, a gated community located on Lake Oconee, about 80 miles southeast of Atlanta.

>> Related: Eatonton couple ‘the unlikeliest of victims’ 

Neighbors of Russell and Shirley Dermond had gone to their home inside the Great Waters subdivision out of concern for their well-being. The couple, married for 62 years, hadn’t shown up at a Kentucky Derby party three days earlier. Phone calls went unanswered.

As their friends entered through the screened porch where Russell Dermond, 88, would watch the Braves on TV nothing seemed amiss. Shirley Dermond, 87, kept a meticulous home. Nothing was out of place. There was no sign of a struggle, let alone a homicide.

Then, inside the garage of the 3,200-square-foot home, one of the neighbors found Russell Dermond’s body, slumped behind one of the couple’s cars. Upon closer inspection, they discovered something beyond macabre — a detail that would escalate this case into the national spotlight.

>> Related: Evidence elusive in murder investigation

Dermond’s head was missing, and so was his wife.

Beheadings are rare. Rarer still was the fact the head was nowhere to be found.

Read more here.